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Open repositories: case studies and check lists Iryna Kuchma, eIFL Open Access Program Manager, eIFL.net Presented at Using Open Access Models for Science.

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Presentation on theme: "Open repositories: case studies and check lists Iryna Kuchma, eIFL Open Access Program Manager, eIFL.net Presented at Using Open Access Models for Science."— Presentation transcript:

1 Open repositories: case studies and check lists Iryna Kuchma, eIFL Open Access Program Manager, eIFL.net Presented at Using Open Access Models for Science Dissemination, the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Trieste, 11 July 2008

2 What? A digital repository is defined as: 1. Containing research results 2. Institutional and/or thematic, and 3. OAI-PMH compliant (From The European Repository Landscape Inventory Study into the Present Type and Level of OAI-Compliant Digital Repository Activities in the EU by Maurits van der Graaf and Kwame van Eijndhoven)

3 Why? The Cornell Libraries Exhibit Sticker Shock 2 (2007) updates the original 2001 Sticker Shock display. Tyler Corson-Rikert produced this exhibit under the guidance of Jill Powell and John Saylor. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 United States License. courtesy of Resonance Research Corporation

4 Why? Materials Science and Engineering Journal A, B, C, & R - $17,986 = Honda Civic Coupe Price increased - 60% since 2002! http://automobiles.honda.com/

5 Why? The Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering Journal is $9,069. Price increased - 34% since 2002 Picture: Solahart / ESTIF

6 Why? The Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering Journal is $9,069. Price increased - 34% since 2002 Picture: Solahart / ESTIF

7 Why? the Journal of Membrane Science - $7506 New Yamaha VX Sport Jet Ski Price increased - 23% since 2002 http://www.yamaha-motor.com

8 Why? 50% of articles published by the staff of Vilnius University, Lithuania, are not accessible in Vilnius University

9 Directory of Open Access Repositories

10 Types of the repositories: – Disciplinary – 150 – Governmental - 20 – Institutional - 906 – Aggregating – 54

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17 eIFL demonstrator

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20 Case studies Open Access repositories are run by -IT departments -university libraries -academic communities

21 Case studies academic community in the Centre for the Humanities of Lviv National University runs one of the repositories. outsource hosting and IT support from Ukrainian Catholic University, and have – 6 local staff and 2 freelancers.

22 Case studies 4 students and department managers were trained to fill in the repository for those researchers who are not able to self-archive at the moment. Populating the repository is also a part of compulsory museum-archival practice for the students from the philological department of Lviv National University.

23 Case studies The repository team is working with learning societies in the humanities to provide them with a platform for disseminating and archiving their research results. 1000 records for less than 10,000 USD

24 Sample set of Open Access Principles 1.0 We support the principle of open access to knowledge. 1.1 Open access facilitates the wide dissemination of knowledge including, but not limited to, original research results, scholarly articles, raw data and metadata, source materials, digital representations of pictorial and graphic materials, and scholarly multimedia materials. (from A Guide to Developing Open Access Through Your Digital Repository by Kylie Pappalardo and Dr Anne Fitzgerald, Open Access to Knowledge Law Project)

25 Sample set of Open Access Principles 1.2 Open access to knowledge is important for the following reasons: 1.2.1 Research is an interdependent process whereby later work is informed by the earlier works of others.Easy and open access to scholarly and research output allows for the production of more accurate and progressive research results, providing for scholarly and intellectual advancement; (from A Guide to Developing Open Access Through Your Digital Repository by Kylie Pappalardo and Dr Anne Fitzgerald, Open Access to Knowledge Law Project)

26 Sample set of Open Access Principles 1.2.2 Broader access to information aids more rapid scientific development, which benefits the community at large, particularly in the area of medicine; 1.2.3 The global sharing of knowledge and learning encourages social unity and cultural advancement; and 1.2.4 The principle that all people, whether rich or poor, should have free and equal access to information. (from A Guide to Developing Open Access Through Your Digital Repository by Kylie Pappalardo and Dr Anne Fitzgerald, Open Access to Knowledge Law Project)

27 Sample set of Open Access Principles 1.3 We believe that the traditional methods of sharing information, primarily through conventional print publishing, while still relevant, are no longer suitably adapted to the wider dissemination of knowledge that new technology allows.Electronic publishing and the internet offer the opportunity to exchange information globally, immediately and effectively. We commit to embracing these new technologies and their role in removing traditional barriers to access. – (from A Guide to Developing Open Access Through Your Digital Repository by Kylie Pappalardo and Dr Anne Fitzgerald, Open Access to Knowledge Law Project)

28 Sample set of Open Access Principles 1.4 We adopt this policy on the basis that where researchers and scholars are willing to share their work, without payment, for the sake of inquiry, knowledge and public benefit, they should not be prevented by restrictive laws, practices or publishing contracts. ( from A Guide to Developing Open Access Through Your Digital Repository by Kylie Pappalardo and Dr Anne Fitzgerald, Open Access to Knowledge Law Project)

29 Sample set of Open Access Principles 1.5 We assert the importance of open access to the results of publicly funded research in particular. This research, as well as being funded by the community, is undertaken to benefit the physical, social and cultural health of the community. Therefore, ideas and knowledge derived from publicly funded research should be made accessible to the community as rapidly and effectively as possible. (from A Guide to Developing Open Access Through Your Digital Repository by Kylie Pappalardo and Dr Anne Fitzgerald, Open Access to Knowledge Law Project)

30 Sample set of Open Access Principles 1.5.1 We support any moves by research funders to promote open access to the published output of research that they fund, including requiring researchers to publish in open access journals or to deposit their output in digital repositories. (from A Guide to Developing Open Access Through Your Digital Repository by Kylie Pappalardo and Dr Anne Fitzgerald, Open Access to Knowledge Law Project)

31 Sample set of Open Access Principles 1.6 We acknowledge the important role played by digital repositories in providing open access to knowledge. We have established an institutional/faculty/disciplinary repository for the deposit of faculty and research output. This repository conforms to OAI (Open Archives Initiative) standards so that it is interoperable with search engines and other archives. (from A Guide to Developing Open Access Through Your Digital Repository by Kylie Pappalardo and Dr Anne Fitzgerald, Open Access to Knowledge Law Project)

32 Sample set of Open Access Principles 1.6.1 We strongly encourage, and where possible mandate, researchers, authors and scholars to deposit a complete version of papers accepted for publication and other appropriate material into our digital repository. Material should be deposited as soon as possible after publication, or where otherwise complete, and at most within six months of publication. (from A Guide to Developing Open Access Through Your Digital Repository by Kylie Pappalardo and Dr Anne Fitzgerald, Open Access to Knowledge Law Project)

33 Sample set of Open Access Principles 1.7 We encourage authors to retain copyright in their work where possible (by not assigning copyright to the publisher), and where the publisher insists on a transfer of copyright, to assert their right to deposit their work in an institutional repository. We support publishing and copyright agreements that allow authors to retain copyright (by only taking a licence to publish) or that allow authors to self-archive. (from A Guide to Developing Open Access Through Your Digital Repository by Kylie Pappalardo and Dr Anne Fitzgerald, Open Access to Knowledge Law Project)

34 Sample set of Open Access Principles 1.8 We commit to educating colleagues, researchers and the public about the importance of open access. We will undertake campus advocacy to increase awareness about our digital repository and its corresponding open access policy. (from A Guide to Developing Open Access Through Your Digital Repository by Kylie Pappalardo and Dr Anne Fitzgerald, Open Access to Knowledge Law Project)

35 SHERPA/RoMEO http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo.php Database of publishers copyright policies – Self-archiving by authors - pre-prints & post-prints – Paid Open Access options – Compliance with research funders mandates Purpose – To help determine archiving rights Sources – Publishers information & correspondence – Users suggestions

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37 SHERPA/RoMEO Sample Record

38 SHERPA/RoMEO Colours

39 Archiving Permissions by Publisher ~66% of publishers allow some form of self- archiving. 90 - 95% of journals

40 Content Academic: the object must be linked with / aimed at academic research or teaching; so teaching materials are relevant, too The object is made, submitted and/or sponsored by a member of faculty or student In principle ready for publication via de IR website (of refereeable quality, not necessarily refereed in the traditional sense) With permission from the author / copyright owner to publish via the IR website (and, if applicable, for long-term preservation) Published, unpublished and grey literature all qualify in principle.

41 Content SPARC: …Materials that satisfy the above requirements might include: working papers conference presentations monographs course materials annotated series of images audio and video clips published (or pre-published) peer-reviewed research papers supporting material for published or unpublished papers (for example, datasets, models, and simulations)….

42 Content gray literature: – Preprints / working papers / theses and dissertations / research and technical reports / conference proceedings / departmental and research center newsletters and bulletins / papers in support of grant applications / status reports to funding agencies / committee reports and memoranda / statistical reports / technical documentation / surveys – SPARC

43 Directory of Open Access Repositories

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49 Guidelines for stimulating the population of repositories (Guidelines) Target advocacy activities a. to senior management with the view to i. obtain high-level support ii. implement mandates to deposit full text where possible referring to those organisations already with mandates in place –From Proudman, V. (2007) The population of repositories. In Eds. K. Weenink, L.Waaijers and K. van Godtsenhoven, A DRIVER's Guide to European Repositories (pp.49 - 101) Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press.

50 Guidelines iii. implement financial incentives to deposit where possible referring to those organisations already with them in place iv. if mandates aren t possible immediately, then implement incentives for deposit such as services to win hearts and minds v. develop policy or services in order to fill gaps in repository stocks –From Proudman, V. (2007) The population of repositories. In Eds. K. Weenink, L.Waaijers and K. van Godtsenhoven, A DRIVER's Guide to European Repositories (pp.49 - 101) Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press.

51 Guidelines vi. strive to become a research management information tool or CRIS giving the repository a dual function; i.e. one-time registration of the recent academic record for internal evaluation and storing and disseminating that content via the repository vii. use them as a sounding board for policy and repository development in the future. viii. If national funding bodies mandate deposit use this argument when presenting the case for deposit to your authors. –From Proudman, V. (2007) The population of repositories. In Eds. K. Weenink, L.Waaijers and K. van Godtsenhoven, A DRIVER's Guide to European Repositories (pp.49 - 101)

52 Guidelines to project or service contributors to support the network in realising ambitious goals d. and develop a communication plan to identify your target groups, challenges in communicating with them, and specify communication tools to resolve those issues within a set time-frame –From Proudman, V. (2007) The population of repositories. In Eds. K. Weenink, L.Waaijers and K. van Godtsenhoven, A DRIVER's Guide to European Repositories (pp.49 - 101)

53 Guidelines e. carefully consider the best means of acquiring missing content before investing in advocacy. Advocacy efforts can be limited if other means are used to acquire missing material from outside –From Proudman, V. (2007) The population of repositories. In Eds. K. Weenink, L.Waaijers and K. van Godtsenhoven, A DRIVER's Guide to European Repositories (pp.49 - 101)

54 Guidelines Be clear about what open access stands for and the benefits that the repository has to the depositer a. Clearly inform on the history and practice of open access in various communities. Quote examples which researchers can identify with, e.g.colleagues, well-known figures, competitive institutions and others who deposit b. Ensure that your repository and its services address real researcher needs or problems, and review these issues at regular intervals. –From Proudman, V. (2007) The population of repositories. In Eds. K. Weenink, L.Waaijers and K. van Godtsenhoven, A DRIVER's Guide to European Repositories (pp.49 - 101)

55 Guidelines c. Be clear as to the relation between your repository or service to others utilised by your researchers. E.g. a disciplinary repository or CRIS. Aim to make links to these for maximum efficiency. –From Proudman, V. (2007) The population of repositories. In Eds. K. Weenink, L.Waaijers and K. van Godtsenhoven, A DRIVER's Guide to European Repositories (pp.49 - 101)

56 Guidelines Make collection development choices which reflect the academic output of your disciplines. Home in on the challenges in unlocking that material as selfarchiving traditions and possibilities differ widely across disciplines. –From Proudman, V. (2007) The population of repositories. In Eds. K. Weenink, L.Waaijers and K. van Godtsenhoven, A DRIVER's Guide to European Repositories (pp.49 - 101)

57 Guidelines Provide added value services which are flexible and adaptable to save the researcher time on non-research activities a. Strive to ensure that as little time and effort is needed to deposit material b. Demonstrate repository services or systems in the ideal case c. Feed back data on the use of that data to the depositing individual –From Proudman, V. (2007) The population of repositories. In Eds. K. Weenink, L.Waaijers and K. van Godtsenhoven, A DRIVER's Guide to European Repositories (pp.49 - 101)

58 Guidelines d. Examples of services are: o CVs or automised publication lists o Search and browse facilities to allow as much cross-interrogation as possible, with the possibility to discover not only new research, but networks be they institutional or people o Push out information from your repository to disciplinary services on behalf of your researchers –From Proudman, V. (2007) The population of repositories. In Eds. K. Weenink, L.Waaijers and K. van Godtsenhoven, A DRIVER's Guide to European Repositories (pp.49 - 101)

59 Guidelines o Use RSS feeds to feed back new material that enters the system to various disciplinary groups o Retro-digitise older material o Seek to preserve the academic record, convert formats, and seek to implement long-term programmes in collaboration with others e. Monitor the use of these services for reasons of cost-effectiveness –From Proudman, V. (2007) The population of repositories. In Eds. K. Weenink, L.Waaijers and K. van Godtsenhoven, A DRIVER's Guide to European Repositories (pp.49 - 101)

60 Guidelines Showcase your efforts and achievements a. Market your research results by publicizing recent additions, usage statistics feeding them back to authors and/ or research department b. Provide results to departments, and encourage dissemination via departmental websites, individual web pages, etc. c. Highlight the most recent additions to your repository by research area / department –From Proudman, V. (2007) The population of repositories. In Eds. K. Weenink, L.Waaijers and K. van Godtsenhoven, A DRIVER's Guide to European Repositories (pp.49 - 101)

61 Guidelines d. Install log analysers of download and upload statistics to help market your repository e. Celebrate milestone moments in the development of your repository by organising expert meetings, discussion fora, sharing your progress and challenges with the research and information professional community –From Proudman, V. (2007) The population of repositories. In Eds. K. Weenink, L.Waaijers and K. van Godtsenhoven, A DRIVER's Guide to European Repositories (pp.49 - 101)

62 Guidelines Be innovative as to how you acquire your content. If at first you don t succeed, try try again: a. If your researchers deposit elsewhere i. Identify which archives are places of deposit for the researcher of a particular discipline ii. Make agreements with selected sources to either harvest metadata or full text depending on the mission of your repository iii. Monitor that data –From Proudman, V. (2007) The population of repositories. In Eds. K. Weenink, L.Waaijers and K. van Godtsenhoven, A DRIVER's Guide to European Repositories (pp.49 - 101)

63 Guidelines Provide Intellectual Property Rights support – details later

64 Guidelines Take on an active role in improving on information retrieval and discovery by a. Contributing your content to services with a regional or international significance and feeding back results to your researchers b. Targeting information services of significance such as Google, Google Scholar, as well as disciplinary ones c. Aiming to optimise the positioning of your material in the result sets of these information services by taking this up with the service providers –From Proudman, V. (2007) The population of repositories…

65 Guidelines Push out your content to the world research community to show your commitment to increasing the impact of your researcher s work a. Liaise with your researchers to identify which sources are of significance b. Make efforts to get your repository indexed or harvested by these information services c. Try to optimize the positioning of your material in these sources –From Proudman, V. (2007) The population of repositories. In Eds. K. Weenink, L.Waaijers and K. van Godtsenhoven, A DRIVER's Guide to European Repositories (pp.49 - 101)

66 Guidelines When organising your repository a. consider the distributed organisation of academic output within the institution when planning population b. thereby strongly considering the research organisational structure of your organisation striving to adapt to that –From Proudman, V. (2007) The population of repositories. In Eds. K. Weenink, L.Waaijers and K. van Godtsenhoven, A DRIVER's Guide to European Repositories (pp.49 - 101)

67 Guidelines c. Strive to give some autonomy to the research community in giving them the responsibility to maintain their output with library support, encouraging them to feel like the owners of their output and providing a departmental interface look and feel –From Proudman, V. (2007) The population of repositories. In Eds. K. Weenink, L.Waaijers and K. van Godtsenhoven, A DRIVER's Guide to European Repositories (pp.49 - 101)

68 Guidelines If you seek to develop a regional or disciplinary service to help populate your repository a. choose a prominent partner with influence, preferably well-recognised by the library or research community b. as co-ordinator aim to provide support on an operational level –From Proudman, V. (2007) The population of repositories. In Eds. K. Weenink, L.Waaijers and K. van Godtsenhoven, A DRIVER's Guide to European Repositories (pp.49 - 101)

69 Guidelines Ensure that the infrastructure is in place to deliver a. Ensure that the staff is available to provide the necessary support b. Ensure that services can be developed to support the researcher –From Proudman, V. (2007) The population of repositories. In Eds. K. Weenink, L.Waaijers and K. van Godtsenhoven, A DRIVER's Guide to European Repositories (pp.49 - 101)

70 Guidelines Strive for cost-effectiveness by a. Analysing work processes and striving for synergies with the CRIS or research management information department or with funding agencies who mandate repository deposit b. Striving for departmental / researcher deposit and not library deposit for long-term sustainability. However, do consider repository investment in acquiring content and investing time to provide a good demonstrator to encourage self-deposit in the future. –From Proudman, V. (2007) The population of repositories…

71 Guidelines c. Share experiences with colleagues of a similar position, be they repository managers, policy makers, technical developers or communicators d. Harvest content from outside your repository to further acquire missing content. –From Proudman, V. (2007) The population of repositories. In Eds. K. Weenink, L.Waaijers and K. van Godtsenhoven, A DRIVER's Guide to European Repositories (pp.49 - 101)

72 Guidelines Challenge yourself a. Just do it and don t spend too long thinking about it b. Be willing to risk a new idea –From Proudman, V. (2007) The population of repositories. In Eds. K. Weenink, L.Waaijers and K. van Godtsenhoven, A DRIVER's Guide to European Repositories (pp.49 - 101)

73 Efficient solutions Shared technical infrastructure and distributed management team National/Regional projects

74 Thank you! Questions? Iryna Kuchma iryna.kuchma [at] eifl.net www.eifl.net


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