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I Know Johnny Cant Read, But What Can I Do?! Presented by Martha Lamb NWRESA October 29, 2010.

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Presentation on theme: "I Know Johnny Cant Read, But What Can I Do?! Presented by Martha Lamb NWRESA October 29, 2010."— Presentation transcript:

1 I Know Johnny Cant Read, But What Can I Do?! Presented by Martha Lamb NWRESA October 29, 2010

2 Todays Schedule 9:00 – 11:45 Review of Research & Assessment Building Fluency Teaching Comprehension Strategies 11:45 – 1:00 Lunch 1:00 – 3:00 Scaffolding the reading process with before-, during-, and after-reading activities

3 Objectives Each participant will be able to: understand the research base that underlies effective reading instruction for adolescents utilize research-validated methods for increasing reading fluency model reading comprehension strategies through think- alouds select and use effective tools to support dependent readers in the language arts classroom

4 What causes students to get behind in reading? Kagan Strategy: Round Robin/Everyone Writes

5 Vision or hearing difficulties Inadequate stimulation during developmental period Multiple childhood illnesses, especially middle ear infections Started school when first eligible and birthday is in July, August, September, or October Struggling Reader Avoids reading Absence of reading role models in home Lack of print material and/or Internet connectivity in home English is a second language Inadequate reading instruction in primary grades Student falls further behind in reading skills Is expected or required to read less in class Factors Contributing To Poor Reading Ability Possible Outcomes Drops out of high schoolInsufficient consumer/adult literacy skills Post-secondary remedial reading classesLimited access to jobs/career Social StigmaReliance upon welfare/social programs Inadequate stimulation during developmental period Multiple childhood illnesses, especially middle ear infections Lack of print material and/or Internet connectivity in home

6 National Reading Panel Report Instruction in: Phonics –Greatest benefit to K-6 students –Helps older students call words and spell but data did not show improved comprehension Fluency –Guided repeated oral reading – significant benefits –Independent silent reading - benefit not yet quantified but is correlated with increased fluency

7 National Reading Panel Report Instruction in Text Comprehension Definition: intentional thinking during which meaning is constructed through interactions between text and reader is enhanced when readers actively relate the ideas represented in print to their own knowledge and experiences and construct mental representations in memory

8 National Reading Panel Report reading comprehension... is enhanced when readers actively relate the ideas represented in print to their own knowledge and experiences and construct mental representations in memory Table Talk: How do each of the following relate to this definition of comprehension? accessing prior knowledge, predicting, visualizing, summarizing, connecting

9 National Reading Panel Report: Implications Phonics – Research-based programs for K-6 & adolescents with serious reading deficits Fluency training – all struggling readers –Guided oral reading –Independent silent reading Text Comprehension Instruction - for students at all levels

10 National Reading Panel Report s/nrp/smallbook.cfm

11 So… where do I start? Get to know your students as readers –Survey (handouts page 1) Gather diagnostic information –ASU Word Recognition Test (handouts pages 2a – 6)ASU Word Recognition Test Create a culture for literacy in your classroom: –Print-rich environment –Pervasive belief that all students can read and improve their reading –Share your reading life

12 Building Fluency Guided oral reading –With teacher –With peer partner: repeated, timed one minute reads Quickread Fluency Practice: handout pages 7 thru 9 Independent Silent Reading –Self-selected books (may need assistance) handout page 10 –Uninterrupted –Supported by authentic sharing, book talks, reading record, etc. (see handout pages 11 – 16) –Should not include an assignment Read-Alouds & Recorded Books

13 Text Comprehension Instruction Should not be confused with measuring comprehension Strategies must be taught directly & explicitly Use gradual release of responsibility

14 Activity Read the text on handout page 17. As you read, be aware of the mental processes you use to make sense of the text. Jot notes about what you did (mentally) as you read to increase your comprehension. Kagan strategies: 1. Pair up to music/Rally partner 2. Team Stand & Share

15 Skilled vs. Dependent Readers Skilled Readers:Dependent Readers: Preview the text and set a purpose for reading Just read... are unaware of their mental processes as they read... do not realize what they can do to improve their comprehension... are not connected to the reading- comprehension process Make predictions and read further to verify their predictions Ask themselves questions as they read & read to find answers Realize when they arent comprehending & use fix-up strategies: re-read, adjust rate, read further & look for clues Create mental images as they read (visualize) Make connections to the text Determine importance of information in the text Make inferences

16 Fix-Up Strategies Re-read Continue reading & look for clues to meaning Adjust reading rate

17 Teaching Comprehension Strategies –Model, model, model: (use think-aloud) (use think-aloud) what good readers do fix-up strategies –Guided Practice –Collaborative Practice –Push for transfer

18 Activity Choose one of the four texts on page 18 of your handouts. Read it silently, a couple of times, noting what goes on inside your head. Jot notes for your think-aloud. Model a think-aloud for your table group. Give feedback to your table partners on their think-aloud: Did each person... –Model more than one comprehension strategy? –Name the strategies he/she was modeling before and during the reading? –Ask the group to listen for the ways he/she would use the strategy to make sense of the text? –Make his/her invisible processes visible?

19 Lunch Please be back & ready to work at 1:00.

20 Before-Reading Activities: Purpose –Activate prior knowledge –Access schema –Predict –Set purpose –Motivate

21 During-Reading Activities: Purpose –Scaffold the reading process –Focus attention on most important information –Monitor comprehension –Apply fix-up strategies

22 After-Reading Strategies: Purpose –Connect new learning to existing knowledge –Process information –Summarize, synthesize, apply

23 Activities to Support Reading Tea Party: b/a Probable Passage: b/a Anticipation-Reaction Guide: b/a Re-Reading: d/a Reading Quads: d

24 Tea Party Mix & mingle with people in your class, comparing the words or phrases on your cards. Notice ways that your word or phrase is related to the others. Start thinking about what the text may be about. Return to your group and write a statement predicting the content of the text; i.e., We think the text will be about _________________ Contribute to class list of predictions Read the text; check predictions

25 Tea Party Words & Phrases (he) did not read the newspapers trouble was brewing men... had found a yellow metal the dogs they wanted were heavy dogs (he) lived in a big house an endless and orderly array of outhouses (he) ruled He plunged into the swimming tank he escorted Mollie and Alice he was the king He was not so large he had lived the life of a sated aristocrat Hunting... had kept down the fat and hardened his muscles the love of water had been a tonic the fountain in the stable yard the roaring library fire he carried the Judges grandsons on his back How accurate were your predictions? Look back at the text and find words or phrases that would have made it easier to predict the content.

26 Comprehension Activity: Probable Passage Arrange word cards into the following groups: Characters Setting Problem Outcomes Unknown Words Write a gist statement stating what you think the selection will most likely be about. List questions you have or things you hope to discover by reading the passage. Read the passage & discuss accuracy of predictions.

27 Comprehension Activity: Anticipation-Reaction Guide Read each of the statements on the anticipation-reaction guide, and on the left side, write A or D to indicate whether you agree or disagree. (handouts page 21) Participate in discussion. Read the text. Revisit the anticipation-reaction guide, and reconsider whether you agree or disagree with each of the statements. Mark A or D in the right (after) column. Find passages in the text that support your position on each of the statements.

28 Comprehension Activity: Re-Reading You are going to read and re-read an article, The Nixon Presidency, in order to increase your comprehension of the text. After each reading, rate your comprehension on a scale of 1 – 10. (handouts pages 23 – 24) Directions: Read The Nixon Presidency the first time to get the gist of the article. Write down any questions or responses you have after this first reading. Read the article a second time, and as you read, take note of things that made Nixon popular or unpopular. Read the article once more, this time looking for Nixons most significant accomplishments. -Table Talk-

29 During-Reading Support Reading Quads Paired-Partner Reading

30 Objectives Each participant will be able to: understand the research base that underlies effective reading instruction for adolescents utilize research-validated methods for increasing reading fluency model reading comprehension strategies through think- alouds select and use effective tools to support dependent readers in the language arts classroom

31 Thank You! Martha: OR Phone: Visit my website:

32 ASU Word Recognition Test Can be used to find students instructional reading level Performance on flash test is highly correlated with reading comprehension


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