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Union Members in 2009 Jim Walker Economist Bureau of Labor Statistics January 29, 2010.

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Presentation on theme: "Union Members in 2009 Jim Walker Economist Bureau of Labor Statistics January 29, 2010."— Presentation transcript:

1 Union Members in 2009 Jim Walker Economist Bureau of Labor Statistics January 29, 2010

2 About union membership data Data on union membership are collected as part of the Current Population Survey (CPS). The CPS is a monthly survey of about 60,000 households that obtains information on employment and unemployment among the nations civilian noninstitutional population age 16 and over. Only employed wage and salary workers are included in the union membership data. Excluded are the self-employed, unpaid family workers, unemployed persons, and individuals out of the labor force (such as those who are retired). Union members who are temporarily absent from work because of strikes are included in the data. Dues-paying union members who are unemployed or out of the labor force (such as those who are retired) are excluded from the CPS union statistics. The union membership rate is the proportion of wage and salary workers who are members of a union or an employee association similar to a union.

3 Union questions in the CPS On this job, (are/is) (name/you) a member of a labor union or of an employee association similar to a union? 1 Yes 2 No On this job, (are/is) (name/you) covered by a union or employee association contract? 1 Yes 2 No 3

4 Chart 1. The union membership rate 1983 through Note: The union membership rate is the proportion of wage and salary workers that are members of a union or an employee association similar to a union. Self-employed and unpaid family workers are not included. Source: Current Population Survey (CPS), annual averages. Union membership rate 20.1 percent 12.3 percent 12.0 percent in 2006

5 Chart 2. The private sector has a lower union membership rate than the public sector. Note: Prior to 2000, private sector data refer to the nonagricultural private sector. Source: Current Population Survey (CPS), annual averages. Union membership rate Private-sector union membership rate Public-sector union membership rate 7.2 percent 37.4 percent 36.7 percent 16.8 percent

6 Chart 3. In 2009, there were more public sector union members than private sector union members. Note: Prior to 2000, private sector data refer to the nonagricultural private sector. Source: Current Population Survey (CPS), annual averages. Number of union members Private-sector union members Public-sector union members 7.9 million public 7.4 million private

7 Chart 4. Union membership rates vary by industry. Union membership rate Note: Education and health services includes private education. Public education is included in the public sector. Source: Current Population Survey (CPS), 2009 annual averages. Private Sector Public Sector

8 Chart 5. Union membership rates differ by occupation. Union membership rate Source: Current Population Survey (CPS), 2009 annual averages.

9 Chart 6. Wage and salary workers age 55 to 64 years had the highest union membership rate in Union membership rate Source: Current Population Survey (CPS), 2009 annual averages.

10 Chart 7. The union membership rate for men is higher than for women, but the gap has been narrowing. Source: Current Population Survey (CPS), annual averages. Union membership rate Women Men 13.3 percent 11.3 percent 24.7 percent 14.6 percent

11 Chart 8. The decline in the union membership rate varies by race and Hispanic ethnicity. Union membership rate Note: The union membership rate of Asians is only available since 2003; the rate was 11.4 percent in Persons of Hispanic ethnicity can be of any race. Source: Current Population Survey (CPS), 1983 and 2009 annual averages.

12 Chart 9. Only four states had union membership rates above 20 percent in (U.S. rate = 12.3 percent) Source: Current Population Survey (CPS), 2009 annual averages.

13 Chart 10. Among full-time workers, union members have higher weekly earnings than nonunion workers. Note: Earnings are median usual weekly earnings of full-time wage and salary workers and have been converted to constant dollars using the Consumer Price Index research series (CPI-U-RS). Source: Current Population Survey (CPS), annual averages. Nonunion workers Union members Constant 2009 dollars $908 $710 $793 $589

14 Chart 11. Among full-time employees, both men and women who were union members had higher weekly earnings than their nonunion counterparts in Note: Earnings are median usual weekly earnings of full-time wage and salary workers. Source: Current Population Survey (CPS), 2009 annual averages. Men, union Men, nonunion Women, union Women, nonunion

15 Chart 12. Among full-time employees of the same race or ethnicity, most union members earned more than their nonunion counterparts in Note: Hispanics can be of any race. Earnings are median usual weekly earnings of full-time wage and salary workers. Source: Current Population Survey (CPS), 2009 annual averages.

16 Contact Information Jim Walker Economist Division of Labor Force Statistics


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