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According to TIME Magazine Submitted by Lori McAlpin, Iowa State University Amazing Inventions of 2009.

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Presentation on theme: "According to TIME Magazine Submitted by Lori McAlpin, Iowa State University Amazing Inventions of 2009."— Presentation transcript:

1 According to TIME Magazine Submitted by Lori McAlpin, Iowa State University Amazing Inventions of 2009

2 1.NASAs Ares Rocket: Metal has no DNA; machines have no genes. But that doesn't mean they don't have pedigrees ancestral lines every bit as elaborate as our own. That's surely the case with the Ares 1 rocket. The best and smartest and coolest thing built in 2009 a machine that can launch human beings to cosmic destinations we'd never considered before is the fruit of a very old family tree, one with branches grand, historic and even wicked. There are a lot of reasons astronauts haven't moved beyond the harbor lights of low-Earth orbit in nearly 40 years, but one of them is that we haven't had the machines to take us anywhere else. The space shuttle is a flying truck: fine for the lunch-bucket work of hauling cargo a couple of hundred miles into space, but nothing more. In 2004, however, the U.S. committed itself to sending astronauts back to the moon and later to Mars, and for that, you need something new and nifty for them to fly. The answer is the Ares 1, which had its first unmanned flight on Oct. 28 and dazzled even the skeptics.

3 2. The Tank – Bred Tuna: At 8:47 a.m. on March 12, fish history happened in Port Lincoln, Australia. A tankful of southern bluefin tuna-regal, predatory fish prized for their buttery sashimi meat began to spawn, and they didn't stop for more than a month. 3.The $10 Million Lightbulb: With the flick of a switch, Philips Electronics may have just dramatically lowered America's electric bill. The U.S. could save enough electricity per year to light 17.4 million households. 4.The Smart Thermostat: A couple of years ago, Seth Frader-Thompson was driving a Prius. Priuses have little screens on the dashboard that tell you what gas mileage you're getting, in real time, as you drive. It crossed Frader-Thompson's mind that houses should have something similar. So he built the EnergyHub Dashboard, a little device, with a screen, that can talk wirelessly to your furnace and your various appliances and let you know exactly how much electricity (or gas) each one is using and how much it's costing you. It can also turn appliances on and off and raise or lower the temperature in your house so you can rein in the real power hogs. EnergyHub is currently partnering with utilities for trials and will be available direct to consumers in early 2010.

4 5.Controller-Free Gaming: This year Microsoft demonstrated a technology, code-named Project Natal, that enables players to control games using only body movements and voice commands, no controller required the gamer's body becomes the controller. 6.Teleportation: Inching our reality ever closer to Star Trek's, scientists at the University of Maryland's Joint Quantum Institute successfully teleported data from one atom to another in a container a meter away. A landmark in the brain-bending field known as quantum information processing, the experiment doesn't quite have the cool factor of body transportation; one atom merely transforms the other so it acts just like the original. Still, atom-to-atom teleportation has major implications for creating super- secure, ultra-fast computers. 7. The Telescope for Invisible Stars: It's no secret that space is cold. But in some places, it's so frigid that light can't radiate in the visible spectrum, which makes celestial bodies invisible. Now the Herschel Space Observatory is exposing them. Launched in May by the European Space Agency, Herschel scans the skies in the infrared spectrum. In order to avoid infrared interference and temperature fluctuations from Earth, it hovers in space at the second Lagrange point, about 930,000 miles (1.5 million km) away, where the gravity of the Earth and sun balance out. Herschel will operate for at least three years, during which it will watch stars and planets being born, revealing more about how the universe came to be.

5 8.The AIDS Vaccine: More than 20 years after the AIDS virus was identified, researchers have devised the first immunization to protect people against HIV infection. 9.Tweeting by Thinking: Plenty of people's Twitter feeds appear to be connected directly to their egos, but one scientist's is actually wired to his brain. In April, University of Wisconsin doctoral student Adam Wilson working with adviser Justin Williams, above tweeted 23 characters just by thinking. He focused his attention on one flashing letter after another on a computer screen while wearing a cap outfitted with electrodes that monitored changes in his brain activity to figure out which character he wanted. His efforts spelled out "USING EEG TO SEND TWEET," among other messages. The feat marks a major step forward in establishing communication for people with "locked in" syndrome, which paralyzes the body, except for the eyes, but leaves the mind alert. For now, though, it's slow going: with the speediest brain tweeters reportedly managing just eight characters a minute, it's a good thing they're limited to The Electric Eye: MIT researchers are developing a microchip that could help blind people regain partial eyesight. Though it won't completely restore normal vision, it will enable a blind person to recognize faces and navigate a room without assistance.


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