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1 United States Policy on Taiwan Office of Taiwan Coordination U.S. Department of State Foreign Service Institute, March 17, 2009 Add photo depicting the.

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Presentation on theme: "1 United States Policy on Taiwan Office of Taiwan Coordination U.S. Department of State Foreign Service Institute, March 17, 2009 Add photo depicting the."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 United States Policy on Taiwan Office of Taiwan Coordination U.S. Department of State Foreign Service Institute, March 17, 2009 Add photo depicting the environment or traditional Pacific Island culture

2 U.S. Interests Maintaining strong, unofficial relations with Taiwan, while maintaining diplomatic relations with the PRC Stability in the Asia-Pacific Region, and in the Taiwan Strait in particular Cultural and Commercial Ties 10 th largest trading partner Vibrant Democracy Rule of law Support free trade and open international markets 2

3 Things are Different with Taiwan Except in those countries with which Taiwan has diplomatic relations, Taiwan is represented overseas by Taipei Economic and Cultural Representative Offices (TECRO) or other bodies, not by embassies. Those who staff these offices are representatives or authorities, not officials. The U.S. is represented on Taiwan by the American Institute in Taiwan (AIT), a nominally non-governmental entity that performs many of the same functions as U.S. embassies do. AIT has a branch in Taipei and a smaller one in Kaohsiung, both of which report to a headquarters in Rosslyn, Virginia. The U.S. does not negotiate treaties with Taiwan, but we have more than 100 AIT-TECRO agreements, which provide frameworks through which USG and Taiwan agencies can interact. 3

4 Things are Different with Taiwan Refer to Taiwan or Chinese Taipei as appropriate, but not to the Republic of China. Refer to Taiwan as an area, entity, or economy, not as a country, state or government. Do not take a definitive position on nomenclature by which to refer to Taiwan, if such nomenclature has not previously been agreed. Refer to individuals representing Taiwan as representatives or authorities, not officials. 4

5 Things are Different with Taiwan When corresponding with Taiwan authorities or their representatives, use plain white stationery, and sign with a personal name only, not a government title. If the letter is from a U.S. official acting in a USG (as opposed to IO capacity), convey the letter to AIT/Washington for transmittal to Taiwan. When traveling to Taiwan, use a blue tourist passport, not an official or diplomatic passport. 5

6 What is U.S. Policy? The United States one China policy is based on the three U.S.-PRC Joint Communiqués and the Taiwan Relations Act (TRA). According to our one China policy, we have recognized the PRC as the sole legal government of "China," including for purposes of membership in international organizations, since We "acknowledge the Chinese view" that Taiwan is a part of China, but we neither accept nor reject that view. 6

7 What is U.S. Policy? We do not support independence for Taiwan, but have never stated that we "oppose" independence, nor have we offered assurances to Beijing that we support unification. We do not support unilateral moves that would change the status quo as we define it. We have assured Taipei we will not pressure it to negotiate sovereignty with Beijing. (1982 Six Assurances) 7

8 What is U.S. Policy? Our long-standing position is that the Taiwan question is a matter to be resolved peacefully by the people on the two sides of the Taiwan Strait. Beyond this, we are silent on Taiwan's political status. This policy, which has been followed by successive U.S. administrations, has been successful in maintaining peace and stability in the Taiwan Strait, even against the backdrop of major political and economic changes in Taiwan and the PRC. 8

9 Taiwan Relations Act (1979) In furtherance of the policy set forth in section 3301 of this title, the United States will make available to Taiwan such defense articles and defense services in such quantity as may be necessary to enable Taiwan to maintain a sufficient self-defense capability. The President and the Congress shall determine the nature and quantity of such defense articles and services based solely upon their judgment of the needs of Taiwan, in accordance with procedures established by law. Taiwan Arms Sales

10 Taiwan Arms Sales (Continued) 1982 U.S.-China Joint Communique: … the United States Government states that it does not seek to carry out a long-term policy of arms sales to Taiwan, that its arms sales to Taiwan will not exceed, either in qualitative or in quantitative terms, the level of those supplied in recent years since the establishment of diplomatic relations between the United States and China, and that it intends to reduce gradually its sales of arms to Taiwan, leading over a period of time to a final resolution.


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