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Russ Housley IETF Chair LACNOG 4 October 2011 Successful Internet Protocol Development.

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Presentation on theme: "Russ Housley IETF Chair LACNOG 4 October 2011 Successful Internet Protocol Development."— Presentation transcript:

1 Russ Housley IETF Chair LACNOG 4 October 2011 Successful Internet Protocol Development

2 Internet Engineering Task Force We make the net work The mission of the IETF is to produce high quality, relevant technical and engineering documents that influence the way people design, use, and manage the Internet in such a way as to make the Internet work better. These documents include protocol standards, best current practices, and informational documents of various kinds. [RFC 3935]

3 IETF Open Standards While the mission of the IETF is to make the Internet work better, no one is in charge of the Internet. Instead, many people cooperate to make it work. Each person brings a unique perspective of the Internet, and this diversity sometimes makes it difficult to reach consensus. Yet, when consensus is achieved, the outcome is better, clearer, and more strongly supported than the initial position of any participant.

4 Successful protocols Consider the following successful protocols: Inter-domain: IPv4, TCP, UDP, HTTP, SMTP, DNS, … Intra-domain: ARP, PPP, DHCP, OSPF, … Successful: a protocol that is used in the way it was originally envisioned Wildly Successful: a successful protocol that is deployed on a scale much greater than originally envisioned or used in ways beyond its original design

5 Potential success factors 1. Meets a real need 2. Incremental deployment 3. Open code availability 4. Freedom from usage restrictions 5. Open specification availability 6. Open development and maintenance processes 7. Good technical design Additional wild success factors: 8. Extensible 9. No hard scalability limitations 10. Security threats sufficiently mitigated

6 Success factor importance 1. Meets a real need 2. Incremental deployment 3. Open code availability 4. Freedom from usage restrictions 5. Open specification availability 6. Open development and maintenance processes 7. Good technical design Additional wild success factors: 8. Extensible 9. No hard scalability limitations 10. Security threats sufficiently mitigated

7 IETF and Existing Protocols Many successful IETF protocols have origins outside the IETF Technical quality not a primary factor in success IETF had a role in improving many of these protocols, often after success of version 1 Much easier when version 1 included a mechanism for extensibility At least a protocol version number

8 Ethos of the IETF IETF uses an open standards process All interested people are invited to participate Even if unable to attend the face-to-face meetings, join mail list discussions All documents are online, available to everyone One Internet Open standards for a global Internet Maximum interoperability and scalability Avoid specialized protocols in different places Contributions are judged on merits: rough consensus and running code

9 IETF takes on work when … The problem needs to be solved The scope is well defined and understood Agreement that the specific deliverables Reasonable probability of timely completion People willing to do the work

10 IETF is right place when … The problem fits one of the IETF Areas Applications Internet Operations and Management Real-time Applications and Infrastructure Routing Security Transport Working to get better at problems that span Areas Working on problems that span Standards Development Organizations (SDOs) take significantly more effort to be successful

11 IETF is successful when … Participants care about solving the problem Participants represent all stakeholders Successful Internet protocols have come from top-down and bottom-up approaches Bottom-up is more common today Most things are incremental improvements

12 Internet challenges Different technologies are pulling the Internet in many different directions Power Bandwidth Mobility New applications Smart objects Infrastructure

13 Power Routers Consume lots of power and generate lots of heat Demands for even greater throughput Small and Mobile Devices Act as always connected Many very small devices are servers Demands for longer battery life

14 Bandwidth Big pipes Greater bandwidth than ever before, and not just between large data centers Availability Competing technologies benefit consumers About one-third of the world's population has access to the Internet, and it is growing steadily Must transition to IPv6 to scale to the whole world

15 Mobility Mobile Devices More and more capabilities: voice, video, , instant messaging, web browsing, geo-location Mobile Networks Ships, trains, planes, and soon automobiles Critical system using Internet protocols Connect passengers mobile and portable devices

16 New Applications Many new applications Voice, video, and entertainment Soon all integrated in the web browser Social networking Peer-to-peer (p2p) Presence and geo-location Synchronization among devices Changing perception of the Internet Critical Demand for privacy and security

17 Smart Objects Emerging uses Smart Grid Sensor networks and medical monitors Many, many, many tiny Internet servers Huge number of addresses – requires IPv6 Large sleep cycles to reduce power needs Special security requirements Requires small code footprint Authentication for firmware updates Routing over intermittent links

18 Infrastructure IPv4 Address Exhaustion Feb. 2010: IANA unused IPv4 address pool empty IPv6 offers much greater address space IPv4 to IPv6 transition mechanisms available Infrastructure Security DNS Security: authentication and integrity DANE WG is expanding to include certificates Routing Security RPKI provides authorization for IP address blocks Authentication mechanisms under development

19 IETF Summary – IETF Movie

20 Internet Challenge Summary Different technologies are pulling the Internet in many different directions: More demanding applications transferring much more data from many more locations to many more locations being used by many more users on vastly more devices Your experience is needed to meet these challenges.

21 Thank You Russ Housley Phone:

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