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3 Week Intervention Plan Julie Scott Grade Level: 2nd Grade Goals/Objectives: 2nd Grade Science Standard & Behavioral Modification.

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Presentation on theme: "3 Week Intervention Plan Julie Scott Grade Level: 2nd Grade Goals/Objectives: 2nd Grade Science Standard & Behavioral Modification."— Presentation transcript:

1 3 Week Intervention Plan Julie Scott Grade Level: 2nd Grade Goals/Objectives: 2nd Grade Science Standard & Behavioral Modification

2 I. Case History Summary Diagnostic Evaluation According to the last diagnostic evaluation in 1996 HB is a 14 year 10 month old student (DOB 6/22/88) who has a profound sensori-neural hearing impairment bilaterally according to audiological results obtained on 5/30/97. Etiology is unknown, although it was suspected at 9 months and diagnosed at 10 months. Subsequently, she was aided at 11 months. Aided results obtained on 2/26/96 indicated threshold recovery to the severe to profound hearing loss range. She receives minimal benefit from amplification and therefore doesnt wear aids. She passed a vision screening with her glasses on 10/13/97 indicating adequate visual skills for learning. However, currently she doesnt wear her glasses because she claims they make her look ugly. Intellectual results indicate that HB is currently functioning within the mildly intellectually disabled range of intelligence on nonverbal performance items appropriate for a hearing impaired student with adaptive scores comparable. HB is in the mild range (55 to 69). Given her age, she is functioning and has interests of a child 8 to 10 years old (IQ 55= MA/14 or 7.7; IQ69 = MA/14 or 9.66). She worked at a slow motor pace and often appeared to be slow in processing through new tasks. Jane tended to rely on trial and error problem solving strategies and often appeared to work best in rote patterns. Adaptive strengths include self-help skills and willingness to initiate social interaction with others. Interpersonal skills can also be a problem area for Jane, however, since she sometimes attempts to control others through inappropriate means such as threats and physical aggression. Also, she sometimes exhibited behaviors that were somewhat exaggerated and/or immature such as clapping and cheering for herself when she was successful with a task. As of late, she is still very emotionally and behaviorally immature. She becomes very upset when things do not go her way or she is not in control. She often has to sit alone outside of the supervisors office in order to cool off.

3 It was noted that during the evaluation, the evaluators used a combination of speech, sign language, points, gestures and pantomime to communicate with Jane throughout the evaluation. Her signs, although somewhat jerky at times, were intelligible. Her vocalizations were unintelligible and often distracting. Janes receptive single sign vocabulary was in the average range when compared to her hearing impaired peers; however, she demonstrated understanding of only two critical elements in a highly structured message that contained familiar vocabulary. Previous testing (RITLS 9/97) also indicated limited understanding of simple sentence structures Janes academic skills are much delayed and generally at a readiness level. She is currently essentially a nonreader. Although she can experience some success over the short term, she appears to have difficulty remembering how words look over the long term. Jane also demonstrates motor and visual-perceptual difficulties. Therefore, I found it important to explore how deaf-blind children are educated. Her writing is immaturely formed, legible, print with some spacing problems. This evaluation found Jane to be a hearing impaired student with multiple disabilities that are impacting on her learning progress. It is important that subsequent content learning be presented in an organized manner and in small incremental steps

4 Recommendations: 1. It appears that Jane is a child who often simply processes information at a rate of speed that is slower than average. It is suggested that when working with Jane, it is necessary to repeat items frequently as well as simply stopping when needed to giver her a few extra seconds of uninterrupted wait time to process through a task. 2. Jane appears to be a student who uses a rote patterned process when completing activities. Therefore, caution is in order when working with her, however, to ensure that one is not deceived into assuming that she has a complete and integrated understanding of something when actually she is only working from a rote pattern and understands only individual parts of it. 3. Be aware of the number of critical elements in a message when presenting information to Jane. In the evaluation in 1996, HB demonstrated understanding of only two critical elements in a highly structured environment that contained familiar vocabulary. 4. Question Jane to verify understanding and comprehension. She seems to be functioning at the Level I – Low Order Convergent. 5 Due to her hearing impairment and the resultant limited language level and academic skills, her functioning level and difficulties in the visual-perceptual and visual-motor areas, it is recommended that Janes education program be combined into a cohesive series of unit teaching. This can be most easily be done through the Language Experience type of approach. The more integrated the approach, the more likelihood of succeeding in all areas. A pragmatically oriented, community-based, instructional setting will be most beneficial to HB. She is currently in a Rotation of Modified QCC classes with 4 teachers, but will be put in a functional contained classroom next school year.

5 IEP Janes Individual Education Plan for the current year indicates that she also has Cerebral Palsy, a lazy left eye, and ADHD. After speaking with the school psychologist, I found out that she was not diagnosed with any of the above at AASD. Instead, her parents took her to an outside specialist. Due to Janes deafness and other learning difficulties, she requires a learning environment that is communicatively and visually accessible, provides repetition and rephrasing, as necessary, and offers frequent opportunities for hands-on experiences in a small setting. Pace of instruction and instructional materials should match Janes instructional level. Janes involvement and progress in the general education curriculum is moderately limited. HBs primary mode of communication is sign language. HB generally understands discussions and directions within the classroom. She has improved in her ability to read simple written directions before she begins written work. HB effectively uses sign language to express information, tell stories, and ask questions. Her vocabulary deficit hinders her ability to write to the same extent in which she can sign the same information. HB has difficulty reading for information and pleasure. She needs assistance with unknown vocabulary. She has difficulty remembering the meaning and the signs to vocabulary words that she learns. Independently, HB reads on approximately a kindergarten-to-first grade reading level. Test directions will be signed to her. She is in a 7 th Grade modified QCC but is currently working with 2nd Grade Science materials.

6 II. Identification of learning problem and objectives including thinking skill objective.. HBs 4 additional disorders: 1. ADHD: a neurobiological disorder that is characterized by developmentally inappropriate impulsivity, attention, and in some cases, hyperactivity. Hyperactivity is sometimes outgrown in the teen years; however, the other symptoms can continue into adulthood and occur at 67% likelihood. Left untreated, can have serious consequences: school failure, depression, problems with relationships, conduct disorder, substance abuse, and job failure. Young children with ADHD often experience two-to-four- year developmental delay. Psychostimulants are the most widely used class of medication for the management of ADHD symptoms and 70-80% of children with ADHD respond positively to them. These drugs increase attention, concentration, compliance, effort on tasks, amount of schoolwork produced, and accuracy of schoolwork produced. They also have been shown to decrease activity levels, impulsivity, negative behaviors in social interaction, and physical and verbal hostility. Behavioral interventions are a major component of treatment. Consistent and positive reinforcement, and teaching problem-solving, communication and self-advocacy skills. Also: a special diet, childs input, furniture + body fit, sit in front of the teacher, secret signal, be predictable, minimal rules, minimal choices, give them one direction at a time, provide the student with low-distraction work areas, prepare the student for transitions, alter presentation of lessons and accommodate assignments, break the assignments into short, sequential steps, alter testing and evaluation procedures, alter the design of materials (simple is better). No two students are alike

7 2. Cerebral Palsy: a condition that is caused by damage to the bran and is characterized by an inability to fully control motor function May also experience other condition such as: abnormal sensation and perception, impairment of sight, hearing, or speech, seizures, mental retardation, difficulties in feeding, bladder and bowel control, and breathing, skin disorders, learning difficulties 3 types: spastic: stiff and difficult movement; athetoid: involuntary and uncontrolled movement; ataxic: disturbed sense of balance, position in space and general uncoordinated movement Vision issues: 40-75% of children with CP have a form of visual impairment; glasses greatly improves incidental learning HL or Language Problems: 20% display either or both HL or Language Problems. If hearing and vision losses are both present, an education approach of deafblidness should be used 3. Mental Retardation: defined by three criteria: 1. intellectual functioning level (IQ) is below significant limitations exist in tow or more adaptive skill areas 3. and the condition is present from childhood (18 years or less) Must be able to teach at their interest level age level and break things down into smaller chunks of information. Also, must repeat instructional information over many days or weeks.

8 4. Lazy Left Eye researched Deaf-blindness: defined as a condition in which the combination of hearing and visual losses in children cause such severe communication and other developmental and educational needs that they cannot be accommodated in special education programs solely for children with deafness or children with blindness (34 CRF © (2), 1999) Although HB is not labeled deaf-blind it was suggested that some of her education be presented in a manner that would benefit her sight issues in particular, her lazy left eye. Students who have visual impairments with other disabilities may learn differently from their counterparts without disabilities. The influence of vision loss and of auditory, behavioral, cognitive, physical, or linguistic challenges certainly has an impact on the way in which students learn. Generalization of skills: Many students with visual impairments may exhibit difficulty transferring skills acquired in context to another. It is especially important that instruction take place in natural contexts and at appropriate times so that the student internalizes meaning to the task. Concrete versus abstract learning: Understanding of abstract ideas or concepts is acquired by visual cues and incidental learning activities. But because these children may have problem with visual cues and learning incidentally, you must explain every aspect of an object or thing before they can learn to think abstractly about the object or thing. Some students with visual impairments may require hands-on learning experiences throughout their educational program in order to make sense of concepts and strategies for instruction that are more abstract. Often the only way a student can learn to acquire a new skill is through repetitive learning. Also, it is important to not change or modify the situation until it is it learned and you are working on generalization. Attention span and distractibility: Teacher must determine how long a student can attend to a specific task with and without supervision. The learning environment can influence this ability. Many students with visual impairments are distracted by loud noises, a visually cluttered classroom, and commotion by other students. These students require organization and structure to maintain control over their learning environments. They require auditory, tactile, or visual cues to anticipate the transition from activity to the next; however, an overload of visual, tactile, or auditory information can cause students to shut down and refuse to work. Auditory versus visual learning: Many students who have visual impairments with other disabilities have auditory perceptual disabilities and are therefore not all auditory learners. However, some students have enough vision to process information visually and are able to interpret concepts into visual images in their minds. Tactile defensiveness verses tactile exploration: Many of these students must gain trust and awareness of individuals in their environment before any physical contact can occur. These students may require order and structure in their daily routines in order to anticipate people and activities. Passive learning vs. active learning: Students who have visual impairments with other disabilities can be susceptive to learned helplessness. If an individual is not given opportunities to gain control or to experience a range of activities independently, then he or she is more likely to yield to the support of others, exhibiting passive or helpless behavior. Others may reinforce this phenomenon by having lover expectations for the student performance. Also, if they do too much for the student and not allow the student to make choices or complete tasks

9 What does this mean? ADHD CP MR Deaf-Blind/Lazy Eye Impulsivity & attention problems Motor function delayed IQ between 55-69Have trouble generalizing skills 2-4 year developmental delay 40-70% also have vision impairment Mental Age is 8-10; functions and has interests of a child this age (IQ 55=MA/14 or 7.7 IQ69 = MA/14 or 9.66 Need hands-on experiences Need Behavior intervention If both hearing and language are involved with CP see Deaf-blind Need to break things down in smaller chunks Easily distracted; need visual cues Repeat informationrepetitive learning

10 A Behavior Intervention Plan IQ between 55-69: 2 nd Grade Science Material (Germs) Need for smaller chunks & repetitive learning: slow pace covering germs for 3 weeks Need hands-on experiences: see lesson plans Impulsivity & attention problems; easily distracted; need visual cues: 1.Given a visual of the emotional response to HB and teacher so teacher and HB could monitor during class. (See emotion cards) 2.Given visual cues for managing impulsivity and thinking flexibly she monitored how she was doing for each. I turn over the frown face if she was not managing impulsivity or thinking flexibly. When I got her attention, I would let her know which one I was giving her a visual cue for if she was unsure. I would then sign either control inside or mind flexible. (see pictures cards) Generalizing skills: Also, at the end of class she was responsible for monitoring how she did with both HOM during class. She was responsible for circling either a smiley face or the frown face. (See below) I was a good listener. I followed directions. 2-4 year developmental delay; Mental Age of 8-10: Instructional & Behavioral plan was on her level. (See pictures above, emotion cards, picture cards, and lesson plans) )

11 In 1996 it was found that HB only understood two critical elements in a highly structured message that contained familiar vocabulary using the ACLC: Assessment of Childrens Language Comprehension. The ACLC is used to determine how many critical elements a student can understand when these elements are presented in increasing difficulty from 1 to 4 critical elements in a picture format. Most of these skills are mastered by the age of 6 ½ by normally developing hearing children. Current informal evaluation using the ACLC found that she had maintained mastery of two critical elements. However, she scored 70% on both 3 and 4 critical elements. This seems to suggest that the student has been exposed to skills at this level, but useful mastery is not yet evident and complete skill acquisition has not taken place. Therefore, I concluded that she may not understand the sequence of events that leads her to her emotional response. For the behavioral plan, I chose to continue working on a 2 sequence response in order to use information that she is able to handle and understand. Also, even though her language comprehension has increased, when explaining emotional responses, I found it better to still stick with as many visual supports as possible Emotional Response

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13 FeelingWhat to doWhat else you can do Consequence Sitting away from the group. A natural consequence for the behavior exhibited.

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15 III.Development of instructional strategies, assessment rubric, and lesson plans. QCC Standard 2nd Grade Science: 1.Describes the relationship between germs and communicable diseases. 2.Recognizes ways to prevent disease by keeping the home, school, and community clean. 3.States and demonstrates health practices that prevent the spread of disease Habits of Mind: 1.Managing Impulsivity 2.Thinking Flexibly Materials Used: Discovery Works Book, What Makes Me Sick by Silver Burdett Ginn Science

16 Day 1 Objectives: 1.Examine videotape of germs. 2.Understand that they are too small to be seen without a microscope. Lesson: Use the book Germs Make Me Sick! by Melvin Berger. Help familiarize the children with the term germs. Where can they be found? everywhere Why cant you see them? very very small How do we see them? Microscope. What do they do? cause you to become sick. Invite the kids to ask questions about germs. Prompt discussion about what illnesses are caused by germs. sore throat, earaches, measles, mumps, stomach flu. What do you do when you feel sick? Go to the (doctor. Also, to assess prior knowledge, invite children to name as many germ-related sicknesses and diseases as they can. Record suggestions on chart paper. Save them for review. HB. will most likely want to be the recorder, if she stays in her seat and accepts that she is the student and I am the teacher we are successful with the HOMs: Managing Impulsivity & Thinking Flexibly) Show the videotape of Germs Make Me Sick! to the class. Discuss the different germs they saw and how people see germs. Ask: Why do you need a microscope to see germs? Assessment: Draw the different germs seen on the videotape H.B. Modifications: Did HB follow directions? (thinking flexibly) Did HB finish her work? (managing impulsivity) I finished my work.. I followed directions.

17 Day 2 Objectives: 1. Examine Drawings or pictures of how bacteria and viruses look under a microscope. 2. Make models of viruses and bacteria. 3. Infer that germs are too small to be seen with the unaided eye. Motivation: Set up a microscope in the classroom and let the children use it se a microscope to look at hair. What does the microscope do? Help the students recall what they learned about germs while reading and discussing Germs Make Me Sick! Ask the children to tell you about the size of germs. What do we need to use to see them? Lesson: Look at E1 pictures of germs. Make clay models using these pictures. Have each student exchange their models and talk about them.(managing impulsivity & thinking flexilby – not to go first and to share the spotlight) Save the models for other activities. Why do scientists look at these under a microscope? To find out how to stop the germs from making people sick. Assessment: Ask the students if the clay modes look the same as real germs? Yes Can these germs (models) make you sick? No How can you see germs? with a microscope. Oh, so these are pretend germs. What about real germs, can they make you sick? Yes Did the students model each germ? Did they recognize that all germs dont look alike? Did they understand that you cant see a germ without a microscope? Did they understand that germs make people sick? HBs Modifications: Did she finish each model? (managing impulsivity) Did she listen to the other students observations? (thinking flexibly ) I finished the germ models. I listened to the other students.

18 Day 3 Objectives: 1.Understand that different types of bacteria and viruses cause different sicknesses. 2. Examine drawings and pictures of how bacteria and viruses look under a microscope. 3.Observe that different types of germs have different shapes. 4.Infer that germs are too small to be seen without a microscope Motivation: Remind them that germs make you sick and that people use the microscope to see germs because they cant see them with their eyes alone. Lesson: Have students observe the different germs on a poster of 4 examples of germs. Ask how we know what they look like? Because these are pictures of germs under a microscope What ways are these the same? All cause sickness. What ways are they different? Look different. What does that mean to look different? If they are all germs and germs cause sickness but these look different, what does that mean? They cause different sickness With an erasable marker, have the children trace the shapes of the germs on the page. Ask them to describe the shape of the germs. What sickness do you think each of these germs cause? Why is it important to learn about germs? to keep healthy Assessment: Do the children understand that different types of germs display different shapes and cause different sicknesses? Give a pair of students 2 pictures of germs. Ask one student describe their picture of the germ while the other one draws it. Switch photographs and have students switch roles and repeat the activity. (thinking flexibly & managing impulsivity) HBs Modifications: Did she allow the other student to describe their germ picture? (thinking flexibly) Did she finish her drawing? (managing inpulsivity) I listened to my partner. I finished my drawing.

19 Day 4 Objectives: 1.Understand that different types of bacteria and viruses cause different sicknesses. 2.Communicate how germs can make you sick and how your body attacks germs. Motivation: Review Germs Make Me Sick! With the class make a list of the ways your body protects you from germs Lesson: Have students make colorful pictures of different germs. Then have them make pictures of the different ways that your body protects you from germs. Help students write a description for each picture. Then staple the pictures together to make a book. Each student will present their books to the rest of the class. (managing impulsivity & thinking flexibly) Assessment: Review the pictures the children drew the day before. Make sure they still understand that germs make you sick. Write the words germs and microscope on the board. Ask the students to choose a word and tell several things that they have learned about the words from this and previous lessons. HBs Modifications: Did she finish her drawings and explanations? (managing impulsivity) Did she listen to the presentations? (thinking flexibly) I finished my book. I listened to my classmates books.

20 Day 5 Objective: 1.Covering your mouth and nose when sneezing can prevent germs from spreading. Motivation: Reread pages 1-11 of Germs Make Me Sick! Aloud. While you read it, ask students to think of different ways the germs are spread. Ask: What are germs? What can germs do to you? Look at the picture of the children on page 11. Why do some of the children look worried? Why should the girl cover her nose and mouth when she sneezes? (thinking flexibly – paying attention to the other students) Ask the students to describe what they should do each time they sneeze or cough and why they should do it. Record their responses on chart paper and save them for review. Show the Videotape Germs Make Me Sick! To the class. Discuss how germs are spread between people. Assessment: Given pictures of good and bad health practices when sneezing, the children will be able to sort into spreading germs and not spreading germs piles. HBs Modification: Did she pay attention to other students comments? (thinking flexibly) Did she offer her own comments or get frustrated because she wasnt the only one talking? (managing impulsivity) I listened to the other students comments. I gave my own comments.

21 Day 6 Objectives: 1. Observe how water droplets travel in a simulated sneeze. 2.Conclude that covering your mouth and nose will help prevent germs from spreading. Motivation: Encourage students to describe times when they sneeze a lot, how they feel during a sneeze, and what happens when they sneeze. Help draw a picture of what happens, that air and fluids come out of the nose and mouth. Ask them if the liquid contains germs. Lesson: Display the spray bottle filled with water. Explain that each spray from this bottle is like a sneeze because when a person sneezes, liquid comes out of his or her nose. Have one child (managing impulsibivity – do not pick HB) hold the spray bottle about 10 inches from the plastic and spray it once. The other children observe what happens. Discuss what the children saw. Ask: What happened to the plastic? It got wet. In a real sneeze, what would be in the water? Germs. Have another student hold a tissue between the spray bottle and the plastic and repeat the procedure. (managing impulsivity & thinking flexibly) Ask: What happened this time? It did not get wet. Why? The tissue stopped the water from reaching the plastic. Have the students draw a picture of what happens when you dont cover your mouth and nose during a sneeze vs. when you do. Assessment: Did the students communicate clearly how the tissue affected the spray? Did they discuss the importance of covering your nose and mouth when you cough or sneeze? Did they draw what happens when you cover your mouth and nose and when you dont correctly? HBs Modifications: Did she participate even though she wasnt picked to be the student who held the pray bottle or the one who held the tissue? (managing impulsivity & thinking flexibly) ) Did she finish her drawings? (managing impulsivity) I watched and joined the class. I finished my work..

22 Day 7 Objectives: 1.Observe how water droplets travel in a simulated sneeze. 2.Conclude that covering your mouth and nose will help prevent germs from spreading. 3.Observe that sneezes discharge germs. Motivation: Explain the concept of slow motion and invite the class to walk in slow motion around the classroom Lesson: Show a picture of a boy sneezing in slow motion with a picture of a germ at the end. Explain that the picture was taken using slow-motion photography. Ask: What is happening in the picture? A person is sneezing Have students notice the enlarged microscopic view of the germs form the sneeze and describe what they see pictured there. Ask: Why should you use a tissue when you sneeze? Because sneezes can be very messy. Why else should you use a tissue when you sneeze? Tissues prevent germs from spreading. Encourage students to use an erasable marker to circle the germs that are being discharged by the persons sneeze. (managing impulsivity & thinking flexibly) Ask: Do you think a person sneezing and not using a tissue would spread germs faster or slower than a person who was sick but not sneezing? Faster because the germs are spread farther, increasing the chance that someone else would catch the germs. In addition to using a tissue, what are some other things you could do to avoid spreading germs when you sneeze? (turning away from people) Have one child take the role of an adult and another, the role of a sick child. Let the adult explain to the sick child how to prevent spreading germs by using a tissue when you sneeze. (let each child take the role of one or the other – pick HB in the last pairs and to be the child) (managing impulsivity & thinking flexibly) Ask students to draw their own pictures of someone sneezing to show how germs are spread and another of how they could be prevented. Assessment: Did the Adult explain correctly how to prevent the spreading of germs? Did the students draw a picture of how germs are spread and how they can be prevented? HBs Modifications: Did HB accept being the child in the pair? (thinking flexibly) Did HB draw a picture of how germs are spread and prevented? (managing impulsivity) I was listened to my classmates.. I finished my work!

23 Day 8 Objective: 1.Observe how water droplets in a simulated sneeze can be spread. Materials: Newspaper Spray bottle with colored water White poster board Motivation: We have talked about different ways to stop the spread of germs. What are those ways? Tissue and covering mouth with your hands. Today we are going to look at what happens you dont do either What is this? A spray bottle. What for? (thinking flexibly) Write guesses on the board. Lesson: Cover the table or desk with the newspaper. Have the students place the white poster board on the newspaper. Tell the children that the water in the spray bottle represents a sneeze Have students discuss where they think the water droplets, mucus carrying germs, will fall. Record their predictions. Tell the students to sit at the table and lean over it slightly. Then hold the spray bottle level with their heads and spray it 2-3 times. Pick HB second or third (managing impulsivity)) Have the children observe where the germs landed and discuss what this means about they can find germs. (thinking flexibly) Have students write the word Sneeze as the title of a chart and divide the paper into two columns with the words spreads germs and prevents germs. Talk extensively about what spreading and preventing means. Then have them draw a picture in each column that shows whether the person did or did not try to prevent the spread of germs. Pick HB near the end (managing impulsivity & thinking flexibly) If one person gets stuck, have other children help by offering ideas (thinking flexibly) Assessment: 1.Did the students observe and understand how water droplets in a sneeze can be spread? 2.Did the students draw pictures to depict the spreading of germs and the prevention of the spread of germs? HBs Modifications: 1.Did HB wait her turn to spray the spray bottle? (managing impulsivity) 2.Did HB draw and help students draw pictures to depict the spreading and prevention of spreading of germs & accept others drawings? (thinking flexilby) I waited my turn! I drew pictures on the chart paper.

24 Day 9 Motivation: Read pages 8-9 of Germs Make Me Sick! Ask Children to tell where germs are found in the picture on page 8. Take turns calling on children with their hands raised (managing impulsivity)) Ask them to explain what the knight on page 9 is doing. Help them conclude that all the germs do not get into the body and all germs do not make them sick Ask students to look at page 8 of Germs Make Me Sick! And review what the girl is telling someone to do. Ask: Why should the child wash is hands? Lesson: Assess Prior Knowledge by asking the student to work as a class to think of some ways that they might catch a cold from someone in their class even if they dont sit near that person Record ideas on chart paper for review. Review the videotape Germs Make Me Sick! With the class. Discuss some of the different places that germs are found. Ask why LeVar Burton rubbed the cotton swabs in his mouth. To collect germs. Ask students to draw a picture of their house and all the places germs could be found. Assessment: 1.Did the students have ideas for the chart paper about how they could catch a cold? 2.Did the students draw a picture of their house and all the places that germs could be found? HBs Modifications: 1.Did she wait her turn to be called on? (managing impulsivity) 2.Did she contribute to making the chart & accept others ideas? (thinking flexibly) I waited to be called on. I helped make our class chart.

25 Day 10 Objectives: Understand that germs exist almost everywhere. Infer ways to minimize the spread of germs. Motivation: We have been talking about school and stopping the spread of germs at school. What about at home? Do you have germs at home? Ask students if anyone is ever sick at home and what happens. Do other family members become sick or not? Lesson: What kind of events at home may cause germs to be spread among your family members? Have them brainstorm and record it on a semantic web on the board. Have the children write a short story with pictures and word about how germs may be spread from one family member to another. They must include at the end of their story ways to help keep germs from spreading. Students will present their story to the rest of the class. Assessment: Did the students understand that germs do exist at home? Did the students tell how germs might be spread at home and at least one way to prevent it? HBs Modifications: Did HB finish her story? (managing impulsivity) Did HB pay attention to her classmates presentation (thinking flexibly) I finished my work! I paid attention to my classmates.

26 Day 11 Objectives: 1.Understand that germs exist almost everywhere, including on your hands. 2.Demonstrate how germs on your hands can be spread. 3.Predict what will happen if someone who has messy hands shakes hands with someone who has clean hands. 4.Infer that clean hands minimize the spread of germs. Motivation: Invite volunteers to recall a time when their hands were sticky or dirty and tell about how they got that way. Lesson: Cover the desk or table with newspaper. Have one member of each group to dip the candy in water, roll it in dust, place the palms of their hands together and roll the candy between their palms. Ask the children to pretend that the dust contains germs that they cant see. Have the children predict what will happen if the group member with messy hands shakes hands with group members who have clean hands and record their predictions. Ask the group member with messy hands to shake hands with each group member. Ask: Where did some of the germs on the messy hands go? they went onto the other persons hand Explain that this is one way that germs are spread.(thinking flexibly) Have students use a cotton swab to collect the germs on their hands and record the appearance on the board. Ask: How could the last person in their group get the germs on his or her hands without actually shaking hands with the person who held the stick candy? by shaking hands with a person who shook the first persons hand or by handling a pencil that was handled by the first person) (persisting) Ask: What are some ways to keep from spreading germs? Wash your hands. Why? Clean hands have fewer germs. Ask: Why is it difficult to see germs that are spread from place to place? Germs are small and cannot be seen with the unaided eye. Why is it important to know about germs? Germs can make people sick. If we understand germs were will be less likely to get sick from them or spread them to other people. Assessment: 1.Did the students pass germs from one child to another? 2.Did their predictions reflect the understanding that hands transmit germs? 3.Did children predict that the red chalk dust would spread from messy hands to clean hands? 4.Did they infer that clean hands minimize the spread of germs? HBs Modifications: 1.Did she share the tasks of the activity? (managing impulsivity) 2.Did she communicate how germs are spread and discuss ways to prevent the spread of germs? (thinking flexibly) I shared with others. I helped in class.

27 Day 12 Objectives: Understand that germs exist almost everywhere. Demonstrate how germs on your hands can be spread. Motivation: Invite children to identify different objects they have touched since arriving at school that morning. List these objects on the chalkboard. (thinking flexibly) Lesson: Have the students examine the list and identify the object that were touched by more than one child. Encourage them to think about the number of people that may have touched an object from the list that day. Make a list of the estimate number and names of people. (persisting) Discuss what would prevent you from getting these germs even if you touched it. Have each child make a sign indicating the need to wash your hands. Place them in each bathroom on their hall. (thinking flexibly & managing impulsivity) Assessment: Did the students understand that germs can be spread by touching where germs were before? Did they infer that clean hands minimize the spread of germs? HBs Modifications: Did HB finish participate in class?(managing impulsivity) Did HB accept where she drew to put her sign? (thinking flexibly) I participated in class! I put my sign in the correct place.

28 Day 13 Objective: 1.Understand that germs exist almost everywhere. 2.Infer ways to minimize the spread of germs. Motivation: Help students recall that germs exist on their hands, and that germs on their hands can be spread to things they touch. Display the Poster Book Picture of the classroom desk. Ask students to identify the object that are shown. Ask: Where do you think you might find germs? everywhere Explain that the objects have germs on them. Ask: Why are germs so difficult to see? Germs are small and cannot e seen without the help of a microscope. Lower the overlay and discuss the location of the germs. Explain that the germs on the Poster Book page are magnified many times. Ask: what are some things you can do to have fewer germs in the classroom? wash hands, wash desks, and not share books or pencils Lesson: Display the three Picture Cards, E1: Drinking from a water fountain. E2: Washing Hands, and E3: Walking down stairs with handrail. Ask the student which of the pictures show people doing things that help prevent the spread of germs. The girl at the fountain and the girl washing her hands Ask children to explain how their actions can prevent spreading germs. Not touching the water spout with face or mouth; keeping hands clean How could germs be spread by the girls in the third picture? they might get germs from the handrail on their hands and give them to other people How might they avoid spreading the germs? By washing their hands Ask: Germs can be found almost everywhere in the world around you. What are some ways you can keep germs from spreading? Children may suggest washing their hands and using tissues when they sneeze and cough. Now, go around the school visiting different rooms. Come back to class and name one room that is likely to be the most germ-free room in the building and draw it. The students will then present their pictures and tell why they think that. (thinking flexibly & managing impulsivity) Assessment: 1.Did students understand that germs exist almost everywhere? On a given worksheet they will circle places in a kitchen that germs would most likely exist. 2.Did the students recognize behaviors that minimize the spread of germs? On a give worksheet they will circle where germs are being spread and put an X on places where students are helping to prevent the spread of germs. HBs Modifications: 1.Did HB accept other students answering questions and possibly naming the same room as she did? (thinking flexibly) 2.Did HB watch the other students presentations patiently while paying attention? (managing impulsivity) I participated in class let the other students participate too! I paid attention to my classmates.

29 Day 14 Objectives: 1.Understand that germs exist almost everywhere. 2.Infer how to stop the spread of germs. Motivation: Hold up individual pictures of different real pictures of food. Ask students to identify each food. Draw on the board or chart in a chart style a picture of a refrigerator, a freezer, and a cupboard and write the name of each. Label this chart Storage. Ask them to pretend we are at the grocery store and we are shopping for things to make for dinner. Explain that when you get home, you need to put them in the correct place. The teacher holds up different pictures each student will come up and places that food on the chart (with Velcro) under the correct location. (managing impulsivity & thinking flexibly) Lesson: Explain that after we shop, get our groceries, come home, and put them away, we want to eat. Have each child pick out a meal from the pictures. (managing impulsivity & thinking flexibly) Have the students make their own chart about what they need to do to keep each of the foods from getting germs. First, talk about how some foods need to be cooked, some need to be washed, and others just need to be taken out of their package. Help them visualize their chart by drawing 3 sections on the board. Ask one volunteer to come up and draw one of the things you can do to foods to keep it from getting germs. The students should draw a skillet, an oven, a grill for cook; a sink with water for wash, and packages open for open. (thinking flexibly) Then have each student work on drawing their chart and placing their food into the right category. Let the group share their chart with the class. (thinking flexibly & managing impulsivity=ty) Assessment: 1.Did the students understand that germs exist on all foods that need to be cooked or washed? 2.Did they know what to do to rid the food they were going to eat of germs? HBs Modifications: 1.Did HB wait patiently to pick out a meal from the picture and share her chart with the class? (thinking flexibly) 2.Did HB participate in class when not picked first to pick out a meal from the pictures or share her chart with the class by finishing her work? (managing impulsivity) I waited until my name was called. I paid attention to my classmatest.

30 Day 15 Objectives: Understand that germs exist almost everywhere. Demonstrate how germs on your hands can be spread. Motivation: Remember yesterday, we talked about how to take care of food how to make sure germs dont get onto your food. What ways can we do this? Washing and cooking food. What ways does the store do this? Packages Make a list and draw these pictures on each side of the board. Lesson: Bring in pictures of packages of food. Ask: What are these chips in? A bag. What is the salsa in? A jar. Do these things protect the food from getting germs? Yes. Ask the children to describe their lunchroom. Ask them to talk about the people that work there. What do they do to protect the food from getting germs. Make a list on chart paper. Take the children to the lunchroom and have them notice things that the workers are doing. How is the food kept, in containers, covered up, etc. What about the people that work there. What if they have germs on their hands? Show them a worker with a glove on. What is this for? Its a covering for your hand, to help prevent the spread of germs. These prevent us from getting their germs Go back to class, have the children write/draw an explanation of what gloves are for. Present findings. Assessment: Did the students understand that food is protected from germs by being in its container? Did they infer that protected hands minimize the spread of germs? HBs Modifications: Did HB participate in class?(thinking flexibly) Did HB finish her work? (managing imulsivity) I participated in class! I finished my work.

31 Pre-test/Post-test Ask the students the following questions: 1. To assess: What is a germ? Provide the child with copies of Magnified Germs 1 and Magnified Germs 2. Ask the child to look at the pictures of the germs and tell you as much as he or she can about the germs. 2. To assess: Comprehension of how a sneeze spreads germs. Have a box of tissues on the table near the child. Engage in a conversation with the child about sneezing. Ask the child to show you what to do when he or she sneezes. 3.. To assess: How germs are spread. Ask the child to point out five places in the room where there are germs. Then have the child explain things that he or she can do to help prevent the germs from causing sickness

32 CriteriaPoints 1234 Understand what a germ is. Know that germs cause sickness Know that germs cause sickness and that they can't be seen without a microscope Know that germs cause sickness, can't be seen without a microscope, and they cause differnt sickness Know that germs cause sickness. they can't be seen without a microscope, they cause differnt sicknesses, and the body can protect itself from germs. __1__ Understand how a sneeze spreads germs Understand that water droplets come from your nose and mouth during a sneeze. Understand that water droplets come from your nose and mouth during a sneeze and that these water droplets can travel far. Understand that water droplets come from your nose and mouth during a sneeze, droplets can travel far, and that they discharge germs Understand that water droplets come from your nose and mouth during a sneeze, droplets can travel far, that they discharge germs, and how these water droplets can be spread. __3__ How germs are spread. Understand that germs exist everywhere. Understand that germs exist everywhere and ways to minimize the spread of germs in the classroom. Understand that germs exist everywhere, ways to minimize the spread of germs in the classroom, and how germs on your hands can spread germs. Understand that germs exist everywhere, ways to minimize the spread of germs in the classroom, how germs on your hands can spread germs, and how to stop the spread of germs on your hands. __1__ ____ Total----> __5__

33 CriteriaPoints 1234 Understand what a germ is. Know that germs cause sickness Know that germs cause sickness and that they can't be seen without a microscope Know that germs cause sickness, can't be seen without a microscope, and they cause differnt sickness Know that germs cause sickness. they can't be seen without a microscope, they cause differnt sicknesses, and the body can protect itself from germs. __4__ Understand how a sneeze spreads germs Understand that water droplets come from your nose and mouth during a sneeze. Understand that water droplets come from your nose and mouth during a sneeze and that these water droplets can travel far. Understand that water droplets come from your nose and mouth during a sneeze, droplets can travel far, and that they discharge germs Understand that water droplets come from your nose and mouth during a sneeze, droplets can travel far, that they discharge germs, and how these water droplets can be spread. _4__ How germs are spread. Understand that germs exist everywhere. Understand that germs exist everywhere and ways to minimize the spread of germs in the classroom. Understand that germs exist everywhere, ways to minimize the spread of germs in the classroom, and how germs on your hands can spread germs. Understand that germs exist everywhere, ways to minimize the spread of germs in the classroom, how germs on your hands can spread germs, and how to stop the spread of germs on your hands. __4__ ____ Total----> __12__

34 Results HB did very well with the behavior plan. 1. Overall: She learned to modify her impulsivity somewhat. She struggled with not being picked first or running the show. However, when I turned down her smiley face and turned up her sad face, I gave her a visual reminder and she was quickly aware of a undesired behavior. However, it was difficult for her to immediately change her behavior and come back to class. But, she never had to leave the room to cool off. Thinking flexibly was an easier task. She would listen to others more readily if she could control her impulsivity first. If she struggled with impulsivity, she struggled with both. But as soon as she or I got her on the right track, she generally could keep it together for the remainder of the class. 2. Everyday Reminder sheets: I found that the use of the everyday reminder and sheet she had to fill out kept her in line. She really likes teachers to be proud of her and this was enough motivation to get her back on track if she faltered. She desperately wanted to circle the smiley face. However, I would do something different with these. I would have added a picture symbol of the action so that she wouldnt rely on me to interpret the meaning. 3. Emotional Response: She had much more trouble with this. Even at a 2 sequence response, something I know she understands, when it comes to emotions and letting them get the best of her she has a hard time. She only had one outburst during this 3 week period. I had to move her card to upset and remind her of the agreement. It took her a few minutes to get over being upset. However, she did not make it to the crying phase where she has to sit outside the supervisors office. HB also did will with the unit on germs. I was very impressed with what she knew when we finished this part of the unit. I felt like it was a good number of lessons and that she had a good grasp of the information due to the repetition and the simplicity of the information. I loved the use of rubrics. It made me assess what I was trying to accomplish and made it easier to make the lessons to her level.


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