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Writing as a Reading Instructional Tool Elaine Gale Hunter College CUNY Susan Easterbrooks Georgia State University.

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Presentation on theme: "Writing as a Reading Instructional Tool Elaine Gale Hunter College CUNY Susan Easterbrooks Georgia State University."— Presentation transcript:

1 Writing as a Reading Instructional Tool Elaine Gale Hunter College CUNY Susan Easterbrooks Georgia State University

2 Objectives Define writing application tools Identify and use 4 writing application tools

3 Writing as a Reading Instructional Tool written language applications to promote reading skill development

4 Writing Tools Dialogue Journals Research Writing Language Experience Stories Writing to Learn

5 Writing Tools Dialogue Journals

6 Dialogue Journals: What? a daily written dialogue between educator and student

7 Dialogue Journals: Why? Interesting Meaningful Motivating Individualized Natural Diverse Functional and Free Interactive No Lesson Planning Effective Rewarding

8 Dialogue Journals: How? Student First Student Centered Privacy Continuous Writing No Corrections All Ages and Abilities FUN!

9 Dialogue Journals: How to Respond Model Conversation Communicative Turn Entries Respond to Student Entry No Corrections Model Correct English Usage

10 Dialogue Journals: Examples

11 Dialogue Journals: Resources http://clerccenter.gallaudet.edu/Literacy/programs/dialogue.html Bailes, Cindy, Searls, Susan, Slobodzian, Jean, Staton, Jana (1986). Its Your Turn Now! Using Dialogue Journals with Deaf Students. Washington, DC: Gallaudet University, Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center. Bailes, C, (1999). Dialogue journals: Fellowship, conversation, and English modeling. Perspectives in Education and Deafness, 17 (5). Paper Resources Electronic Resources

12 Dialogue Journals: Exercises What to do when: Student gives one word answers? Ask Open Ended Questions Students just draw pictures in their dialogue? Ask Questions about drawings that require verbal answers; label picture Student uses poor grammar? Model Correct Written English Usage

13 Writing Tools Dialogue Journals Research Writing Language Experience Stories Writing to Learn

14 Writing Tools Research Writing

15 Research Reading and Writing: What? students investigate nonfiction topics and report in writing to demonstrate comprehension

16 Research Reading and Writing: Why? Learn Research Skills Build Self Confidence Demonstrate Comprehension of Nonfiction Books

17 Research Reading and Writing: How? Question Gather Categorize Analyze Synthesize Write

18 Research Reading and Writing: Examples

19 Research Reading and Writing: Resources http://clerccenter.gallaudet.edu/Literacy/programs/research.html Welsh-Charrier, C. (1999). Conducting Research: When the End Is the Means. Perspectives in Education and Deafness, 17 (5,) May/June Paper Resources Electronic Resources

20 Research Reading and Writing: Exercises What do we KNOW What do we WANT to know What did we LEARN

21 Writing Tools Dialogue Journals Research Writing Language Experience Stories Writing to Learn

22 Writing Tools Language Experience Stories

23 Language Experience Stories: What? develop and reinforce reading and writing by using a learners personal experiences and natural language

24 Language Experience Stories: Why? Student- Centered Student-Initiated Inquiry-Oriented Authentic Language Literacy Learning

25 Language Experience Stories: How? Student Initiate Experience Record Translate Into Writing Use Text For Reading

26 Language Experience Stories: Examples Sign Write in English Sign Back Text Think Aloud Add Art

27 Language Experience Stories: Video Example Visit to the Grossology Museum 1st & 2nd grade class

28 Click for Video Snotology video

29 Language Experience Stories: Resources Helms, L. L., and David R. Schleper (2000). Language Experience: Fun Projects After School, Including Writing. Odyssey, 1(3), 13- 16.Odyssey Nelson, Olga G. and Wayne M. Linek (1999). Practical Classroom Applications of Language Experience: Looking Back, Look Forward. Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon. Whitesell, Kathleena M. (1999). Language Experience. Leading from Behind. Perspectives in Education and Deafness. http://clerccenter.gallaudet.edu/Literacy/programs/language.html Paper Resources Electronic Resources

30 Language Experience Stories: Resources Schleper, David (2002). Leading from Behind: Language Experience in Action. Washington, DC: Gallaudet University, Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center. Video Resources Paper Resources Schleper, David (2002). Leading from Behind: Language Experience in Action. Washington, DC: Gallaudet University, Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center.

31 Language Experience Stories: Video Exercise While viewing this next clip, think about how would you promote writing in this language experience activity?

32 Click for Video Poopology video

33 How would you promote writing in this language experience activity?

34 Click for Video LEAall Video

35 Language Experience Stories: Video Exercise Next Clip: How would you translate the students comment into written English?

36 Click for Video Translate.mov

37 Click for Video Translate II Video

38

39 Writing Tools Dialogue Journals Research Writing Language Experience Stories Writing to Learn

40 Writing Tools Writing to Learn

41 Writing to Learn: What? informal writing strategy to record personal predictions, observations and reflections

42 Writing to Learn: What? Write to LearnLearn to Write

43 Writing to Learn: Why? Content Learning Own Information English Literacy Evaluate Concepts Attitude Access

44 Writing to Learn: How? Guided Free Writing Creative Piece End of Class Reflection Double Entry Rewriting an Excerpt Biographical Sketch Journal Logs Graphic Organizers

45 Writing to Learn: How? Use Notebooks Date Each Entry Dont Correct Grammar Ask for Clarification Rewriting an Excerpt Use to Evaluate Progress

46 Writing to Learn: Examples I am a chocolate chip cookie. My mother came and picked me up. I was scared and my mother's mouth opened. Entering, I looked in the dark mouth. The teeths kept missing me because I kept moving. Slideing down the throat, I saw stickey white stuff in the esophagus. Arriving in the stomach, there were other foods and the juices washed me up. Then I was send down the intestines. Sledding in river of blood, I was stemed into the veins. I traveled all over the body. Finally, I arrived to the urain place. Suddently, I was rushed out and were flushed in the toilet. "Chocolate Chip Adventure"

47 Writing to Learn: Examples KWL Compare and Contrast Venn Diagram Problem/ Solution Storyboard Spider Map

48 Writing to Learn: Resources Lang, H. G. & Albertini, J. A. (2001). Construction of Meaning in the Authentic Science Writing of Deaf Students. Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education, 6, 4, 258-284. Yore, L. (2000). Enhancing science literacy for all students with embedded reading instruction and writing-to-learn activities. Journal of Deaf Studies and Education, 5, 105-122. Paper Resources Electronic Resources http://www.thinkingmaps.com/htthinkmap.php3 http://www.writesite.org/html/organize.html

49 Writing to Learn: End of Class Reflection Write down on a piece of paper 2 or 3 things you have learned so far about writing to learn.

50 Writing Tools: End of Class Reflection Dialogue Journals Research Writing Language Experience Stories Writing to Learn


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