Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Robyn Rice Graduate Student Dr. Susan Easterbrooks Georgia State University Methods of Teaching Atypical Deaf Students Pervasive Developmental Disorder.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Robyn Rice Graduate Student Dr. Susan Easterbrooks Georgia State University Methods of Teaching Atypical Deaf Students Pervasive Developmental Disorder."— Presentation transcript:

1 Robyn Rice Graduate Student Dr. Susan Easterbrooks Georgia State University Methods of Teaching Atypical Deaf Students Pervasive Developmental Disorder

2 Table of Contents Information about Pervasive Developmental Disorder (slides 3-19) Information about Pervasive Developmental Disorder (slides 3-19) Background info on case study (slides 20-23) Background info on case study (slides 20-23) Instructional Needs (slide 24) Instructional Needs (slide 24) Behavioral Needs (slide 25) Behavioral Needs (slide 25) Habits of Mind Inclusion (slide 26) Habits of Mind Inclusion (slide 26) Additional Supports (slides 27-31) Additional Supports (slides 27-31) Pre-Testing Rubrics (slides 32-33) Pre-Testing Rubrics (slides 32-33) Intervention/ Lesson Plans (slides 34-47) Intervention/ Lesson Plans (slides 34-47) Worksheets (slides 48- 50) Worksheets (slides 48- 50)

3 What are PDDs? Facts and symptoms What are PDDs? Facts and symptoms Subclasses of Pervasive Developmental Disorders (PDD). Subclasses of Pervasive Developmental Disorders (PDD). How are they diagnosed? How are they diagnosed? What are the causes of PDDs? What are the causes of PDDs? How are PDDs treated? How are PDDs treated? What is it like to be autistic? What is it like to be autistic? Local and State Resources Local and State Resources PDD Topics to Cover

4 A complex developmental disability that includes some or all of the following characteristics: Ritualistic behaviors Ritualistic behaviors Repetitive behaviors Repetitive behaviors Short attention Span Short attention Span Impaired communication/ verbal expression Impaired communication/ verbal expression Limited social interaction Limited social interaction Over or under responsive to sensory stimulation Over or under responsive to sensory stimulation Over or under physical activity Over or under physical activity Apparently baseless tantrums Apparently baseless tantrums

5 Affects approximately 1 in 500 children Affects approximately 1 in 500 children Statistics show this rate may be rising to as high as 1 in 200 children Statistics show this rate may be rising to as high as 1 in 200 children PDD is the third most common developmental disability PDD is the third most common developmental disability Boys are approximately 4 times more susceptible that girls Boys are approximately 4 times more susceptible that girls PDDs cross racial, ethnic and lifestyle PDDs cross racial, ethnic and lifestyle Children of lower socio-economic status may be more susceptible to PDD Children of lower socio-economic status may be more susceptible to PDD PDD symptoms are usually apparent by age 2 or 3 PDD symptoms are usually apparent by age 2 or 3 PDDs are more frequently associated with mild to severe mental retardation PDDs are more frequently associated with mild to severe mental retardation

6 Autism Autism Aspergers Syndrome Aspergers Syndrome Retts Syndrome Retts Syndrome Childhood Disintergrative Disorders Childhood Disintergrative Disorders Pervasive Developmental Disorder, PDD- NOS (not otherwise specified) Pervasive Developmental Disorder, PDD- NOS (not otherwise specified) High functioning autism High functioning autism

7 Impaired social interaction Including non-verbal behaviors, lack of eye gaze, body posture and gestures to discourage social interaction Including non-verbal behaviors, lack of eye gaze, body posture and gestures to discourage social interaction Lack of social or emotional reciprocity Lack of social or emotional reciprocity Lack of spontaneous enjoyment or interest Lack of spontaneous enjoyment or interest No or few friends No or few friends Impaired communication Delay or total lack of spoken language Delay or total lack of spoken language For those with speech, they do not initiate conversation For those with speech, they do not initiate conversation Stereotyped or repetitive use of language (maybe echolalia) Stereotyped or repetitive use of language (maybe echolalia) Lack of imaginative play Lack of imaginative play Restrictive or Repetitive Behaviors Preoccupation with one or more patterns of intense interest Preoccupation with one or more patterns of intense interest Inflexibility to change in routine Inflexibility to change in routine Repetitive motor mannerisms Repetitive motor mannerisms Characteristics apparent by age 6 Information taken from the DSM-IV

8 Impaired social interaction (apparent before age 2) Including non-verbal behaviors, lack of eye gaze, body posture and gestures to discourage social interaction Including non-verbal behaviors, lack of eye gaze, body posture and gestures to discourage social interaction Lack of social or emotional reciprocity Lack of social or emotional reciprocity Lack of spontaneous enjoyment or interest Lack of spontaneous enjoyment or interest No or few friends No or few friends Restrictive or Repetitive Behaviors Preoccupation with one or more patterns of intense interest Preoccupation with one or more patterns of intense interest Inflexibility to change in routine Inflexibility to change in routine Repetitive motor mannerisms Repetitive motor mannerisms No Significant delay in language No Significant delay in cognitive development (self-help skills, curiosity, and adaptive behaviors)

9 Information taken from the DSM-IV Normal prenatal and perinatal development Normal prenatal and perinatal development Normal psychological development for first 5 months Normal psychological development for first 5 months Normal motor development for first 5 months Normal motor development for first 5 months Normal head circumference at birth Normal head circumference at birth Deceleration of growth from 5-48 months Deceleration of growth from 5-48 months Loss of acquired meaningful hand movements and gain of stereotypical hand movements. Loss of acquired meaningful hand movements and gain of stereotypical hand movements. After 5 months of age loss of social engagement After 5 months of age loss of social engagement Poor gait Poor gait Onset of severely impaired expressive and receptive language Onset of severely impaired expressive and receptive language Onset of severe psychological and motor retardation Onset of severe psychological and motor retardation

10 Information taken from the DSM-IV Apparently normal development in language (verbal and non-verbal), motor skills, social skills, and psychological development for at least the first two years Apparently normal development in language (verbal and non-verbal), motor skills, social skills, and psychological development for at least the first two years After two years, loss of acquired skills in at least two of the following areas: Expressive and receptive language, social skills, Bowel and bladder control, play skills, motor skills After two years, loss of acquired skills in at least two of the following areas: Expressive and receptive language, social skills, Bowel and bladder control, play skills, motor skills The above is not accounted for by other PPD or schizophrenia The above is not accounted for by other PPD or schizophrenia Abnormal development regarding social interaction, communication impairment, repetitive or stereotypical behavior in interests, behaviors, and activities Abnormal development regarding social interaction, communication impairment, repetitive or stereotypical behavior in interests, behaviors, and activities

11 Information taken from the DSM-IV Used when there is a severe developmental delay or impairment in two or more of the following areas: Social interaction Verbal and Non-verbal language Stereotypical repetitive behavior in regards to interests and activities Criteria are not met under other PDDs, schizophrenia, or avoidant personality disorder

12 Mercury has been linked to autism Mercury has been linked to autism Association with neural tube disorders Association with neural tube disorders Lead exposure has been associated with milder forms of PDD Lead exposure has been associated with milder forms of PDD Brain damage (pre or postnatal) Brain damage (pre or postnatal) Complications during birth Complications during birth Thyroid Problems Thyroid Problems Malnutrition Malnutrition Genetic Disorder (Twin studies have shown that identical twins have a 40-85% chance of both children having PDD, and fraternal twins having a less than 5% occurrence). Genetic Disorder (Twin studies have shown that identical twins have a 40-85% chance of both children having PDD, and fraternal twins having a less than 5% occurrence). Multiple genes have been identified with autism Multiple genes have been identified with autism Immunization shots have been linked with autism Immunization shots have been linked with autism Multiple cases of PDDs have been found to be more prevalent in specific areas, especially near chemical and nuclear plants and devices Multiple cases of PDDs have been found to be more prevalent in specific areas, especially near chemical and nuclear plants and devices BASICALLY UNKNOWN

13 Behavior Modification: number one form of treatment. Early and persistent treatment is most successful Behavior Modification: number one form of treatment. Early and persistent treatment is most successful Psychotherapy Psychotherapy Parental education and training Parental education and training Social skills training Social skills training Educational adaptation Educational adaptation Medications for symptoms (hyperactivity, attention, impulsivity, aggression, compulsions, anxieties, etc.) Medications for symptoms (hyperactivity, attention, impulsivity, aggression, compulsions, anxieties, etc.)

14 Cure Autism Now: program in LA, based on the techniques used by Soma Mukhopadhyay and her son, Tito. Soma worked with her son non-stop using a what is now referred to as the rapid prompting method. She forced him to focus by gently probing him, sometimes raising her voice to keep him on track when she asked him questions and required an answer. Tito now communicates through writing and poetry; although still has many autistic tendencies. Cure Autism Now: program in LA, based on the techniques used by Soma Mukhopadhyay and her son, Tito. Soma worked with her son non-stop using a what is now referred to as the rapid prompting method. She forced him to focus by gently probing him, sometimes raising her voice to keep him on track when she asked him questions and required an answer. Tito now communicates through writing and poetry; although still has many autistic tendencies. Son-Rise Program: program developed by Raun Kauffman and his family. Raun was also diagnosed autistic in the 70s. His parents developed a program based around joining the autistic child on the other side of the wall. The Kauffman program is out in Massachusetts. Son-Rise Program: program developed by Raun Kauffman and his family. Raun was also diagnosed autistic in the 70s. His parents developed a program based around joining the autistic child on the other side of the wall. The Kauffman program is out in Massachusetts. Judevine Training: Missouri based program centered around Applied Behavior Analysis. Judevine Training: Missouri based program centered around Applied Behavior Analysis. Dan Marino Center: Florida based program started by football player, Dan Marino and his wife, Claire. Their son, Mike was diagnosed with autism at a young age, now at the age of 14 he shows no symptoms. Dan Marino Center: Florida based program started by football player, Dan Marino and his wife, Claire. Their son, Mike was diagnosed with autism at a young age, now at the age of 14 he shows no symptoms.

15 I wont say I have been cured because you cant really be cured of autism. But I have overcome it. Thats what you can do, you can overcome it. I dont notice it at all anymore. Mike Marino With the help of my imagination, I can go to places that do not exist and they are like beautiful dreams. But it is a world full of improbability racing toward uncertainty. Tito Mukopadhyay The thoughts are bigger than I can express, every move that I make shows how trapped I feel under the continuous happenings. Tito M. At 18 months, I was diagnosed as severely autistic, with a tested I.Q. of less than 30. Completely mute and withdrawn from human contact I would spend my days endlessly engaged in repetitive behaviors such as spinning plates, rocking back and forth, and flapping my hands in from of my face. I didnt want to be touched. I never looked at other people, and I did not give the slightest response to the calls and request of the people around me. I was in my own world. ~Raun Kaufman

16 To experience how an autistic person writes put on very thick gloves and write you name, address, phone number, alphabets, and numbers. Sensory perception is often a problem for PDD individuals. To have a sense of what it may be like try the following exercise: In a room that can be darkened set up a strobe light, a radio, a gardening glove, and a loofah sponge mitt. Have the participants sit at desks or tables in the room. Explain to them that they are autistic students in a class with a new teacher. Introduce yourself as their new teacher and tell them they must sit still in their seats, sit quietly and follow the rules. Turn out the lights and turn on the strobe light and turn on the radio very loud between stations. Introduce yourself to each child shaking their hands with the glove on your hand and moving in close to their face and then far away varying your voice. When the student pulls away or jumps, pat their face with the loofah and say that will be okay, dont be nervous. When the last student is finished the teacher jumps up, claps her hands throws on the lights, stamps her foot and says Thats enough! This is the last straw. If you cant behave you will have to leave my classroom. DISCUSS!

17 Emory Autism Resource Center A state-wide resource in Atlanta. Offers diagnosis, treatment, referral, and family support. http://www.emory.edu/ FMD/web/autism.htm Contact person: Rene Dawson 718 Gatewood Road Atlanta, GA 30322 Telephone: 404.727.3964 E-mail: tohannon@emory.edu tohannon@emory.edu Parent to Parent of Georgia A non-profit organization for Georgia families. Provides support and information to parents of children with disabilities. This website offers free newsletters, resources, posting, monthly teleconferences. A great resource for families http://parenttoparentofga.org/ http://parenttoparentofga.org/ Atlanta Office Esther Sherberger, Director 3805 Presidential Parkway, Suite 207 Atlanta, GA 30340 770-451-5484 Toll-free: 800- 229-2038 Fax: 770-458-4091 Babies Can't Wait (Georgia) Georgia's early intervention program for children from birth to age three. If you suspect your child has a delay in development, contact your local office. 404-657-2726 E-mail: gdphinfo@dhr.state.ga.us gdphinfo@dhr.state.ga.us

18 Medical College of Georgia - Child Neurology Section Contact information for the MCG Child Neurology section – houses the autism program, which offers developmental and autism assessments. More clinical site. dwloring@neuro.mcg.edu Autism-Georgia Autism news, information, and research network for Georgia. This is a Yahoo Group for Georgia parents of children with autism and friends. Join to read messages. Autism Listserv http://groups.yahoo.com/grou p/autism-georgia/ Resources for Teaching and TrainingResources for Teaching and Training Why do toys and resources for children with autism have to cost so darn much!? Visit this page for links to the best free resources on the Internet. http://groups.msn.com/TheAutismHomePage/resour cesforteaching.msnw Autism Society of America - Greater Georgia Chapter Information and links on autism, parent support, and more. http://www.asaga.com/

19

20 What are we looking at today? M.G.s personal history M.G.s personal history Identification of instructional/ behavioral needs Identification of instructional/ behavioral needs Collaboration with professionals and family Collaboration with professionals and family Intervention including pre and post tests Intervention including pre and post tests Additional Disorder: Pervasive Developmental Disorder Additional Disorder: Pervasive Developmental Disorder

21 M.G. is a 12-year old boy with a severe to profound bilateral hearing loss M.G. is a 12-year old boy with a severe to profound bilateral hearing loss M.G.s hearing loss was identified when he was one-year old and he was fitted with bilateral hearing aids when he was 2 years old. He has worn his aids consistently since that time M.G.s hearing loss was identified when he was one-year old and he was fitted with bilateral hearing aids when he was 2 years old. He has worn his aids consistently since that time Aided M.G. can hear in the moderate range, including some speech sounds Aided M.G. can hear in the moderate range, including some speech sounds Both of M.G.s parents are hearing and there is no family history of hearing loss Both of M.G.s parents are hearing and there is no family history of hearing loss

22 M.G.s disabilities resulted due to maternal gestational diabetes M.G.s disabilities resulted due to maternal gestational diabetes M.G. has cerebral palsy M.G. has cerebral palsy M.G. has been diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder M.G. has been diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder M.G. has also been diagnosed with Pervasive Developmental Disorder M.G. has also been diagnosed with Pervasive Developmental Disorder M.G. is an only child; however, the family has recently considered adopting another child M.G. is an only child; however, the family has recently considered adopting another child M.G.s father works out of the home and travels out of town frequently M.G.s father works out of the home and travels out of town frequently M.G.s mother does not work M.G.s mother does not work

23 M.G. is currently placed in a self-contained special needs class at a school for the Deaf. M.G. is currently placed in a self-contained special needs class at a school for the Deaf. Most recent testing took place at the Marcus Institute in February 2000 Most recent testing took place at the Marcus Institute in February 2000 M.G. was administered the Leiter International Performance scale and was identified as having a full IQ of 45 M.G. was administered the Leiter International Performance scale and was identified as having a full IQ of 45 M.G. has a moderate intellectual disability M.G. has a moderate intellectual disability The Vineland adaptive scale shows M.G. to have a functional level at the age equivalency of 2 ½ years The Vineland adaptive scale shows M.G. to have a functional level at the age equivalency of 2 ½ years M.G. has passed all recent vision screenings M.G. has passed all recent vision screenings

24 M.G.s short attention span and low developmental level, result in his difficulty M.G.s short attention span and low developmental level, result in his difficulty to learn new material to learn new material M.G. is able to count from 1-5 by rote, but with difficulty due to motor difficulties, not cognitive difficulties. M.G. is able to count from 1-5 by rote, but with difficulty due to motor difficulties, not cognitive difficulties.

25 M.G. has an extremely short attention span M.G. has an extremely short attention span When M.G. is not receiving constant attention during lessons, he becomes aggressive towards his classmates and teachers When M.G. is not receiving constant attention during lessons, he becomes aggressive towards his classmates and teachers When the teacher asks a question, if M.G. is not called on he will hit the student sitting beside or rip up his papers When the teacher asks a question, if M.G. is not called on he will hit the student sitting beside or rip up his papers M.G.s behaviors include hitting, biting, eye poking, and hair pulling. With hitting the most prevalent behavior.

26 The habits of mind we focused on were: Managing Impulsivity: throughout the course of the lesson one of my goals was to teach M.G. more appropriate ways of gaining someones attention, through excuse me, eye contact or a gentle tap. We engaged in several role playing exercises. When someone is in M.G.s way his first instinct is to hit them, I tried to teach him to think before he hits. Applying Past Knowledge to New Situation: this was a step by step lesson, and each new activity built upon previous activities. I was constantly saying, remember when we did this or oh you know how to do this. Gathering data through all of your sense: hence the reason for wood numbers, carpet numbers, drums, food, etc.

27

28 SJ is the Occupational therapist at the Atlanta Area School for the Deaf. SJ works twice weekly with MG. They work together one time weekly in the classroom and one time weekly for pullout therapy. The OT assisted M.G. in and out of the classroom on sequencing. SJ developed several worksheets with numbers 1-5 scattered around. MG had to draw lines from one number to the next in sequential order. SJ said that it is difficult to tell if MG is able to sequence the numbers through this task because his motor skills are poor.

29 CC is the speech language pathologist at AASD. CC works with MG one time weekly in the classroom. CC and MG have been working on incorporating his Dynavox (AAC device) into the classroom. CC and MG have been working on enhancing MGs vocabulary in relation to his behavior. They have added his rules to the Dynavox using the same picture symbols we have been using for the rules all year. During their meeting times they review the rules and talk about ways for MG to behave when we becomes frustrated with someone.

30 The behavior team at AASD has been instrumental in assisting with MGs behavioral needs. The behavior team (a.k.a. Dr. Red) consists of the 4 supervising principals. Because of MGs smaller stature, when he does have a blow up he is easier to handle. His peers and his teachers are not afraid of him when he becomes upset. When he hits his classmates or peers, they will not hit back and usually do not inform a teacher. When other students exhibit the same behavior the behavior team is paged, but for MG they have not been called. The team is now is being called for MG whenever his behavior becomes unmanageable. He is given the same treatment as his peers. He is placed in timeout and loses the same privileges as others would.

31 It has also been extremely important to involve the family for our plan to work. At the beginning of our plan, I met with the family in their home, along with the school social worker, DH. We discussed MGs behavior at home, we well as at school. The family was having similar behavior problems with him at home. He was biting, hitting and eye poking his parents when he did not get his way. Throughout the implementation of the behavior plan, we tried to keep consistency in what we were doing at home and at school. MGs parents did admit to having problems keeping up with the plan. At school, MGs daily schedule is structured and routine, and at home his schedule fluctuates and is very unstructured. We discussed trying to tighten the routine at home but his parents were not willing to run their household in that manner.

32 Criteria Criteria MG will match number 1- 5 MG is able to match number 1 MG is able to match number 2 MG is able to match number 3 MG is able to match number 4 MG is able to match number 5 MG will sequence numbers 1-5 MG is able to sequence from 1-2 MG is able to sequence from 2-3 MG is able to sequence from 3-4 MG is able to sequence from 4-5 N/A MG will write numbers 1-5 in sequence MG is able to sequence from 1-2 (typing on the computer) N/A Recorder: _________________ Date: ___________________

33 Criteria Criteria point s MG will not hit his classmates MG did not hit his classmates between 8am and 10am ____ 3 pts MG did not hit his classmates between 10am and noon ____ 2 pts MG did not hit his classmates between noon- 3pm ____ 2 pts MG only hit classmates to gain their attention ____ 1 pts MG will not hit his teachers MG did not hit his teachers between 8am and 10am ____ 3 pts MG did not hit his teachers between 10am and noon ____ 2 pts MG did not hit his teachers between noon- 3pm ____ 2 pts MG only hit teachers to gain their attention ____ 1 pts Total---> Recorder: _________________ Date: ___________________

34 Monday: Begin pre-testing on behavioral and instructional skills Tuesday: Continue with pre-testing on both skills Wednesday: Continue with pre-testing on both skills Thursday: Continue pre-testing on behavioral skills and begin instruction on instruction skills Friday: Continue pre-testing on behavioral skills and continue instruction on instructional skills Monday-Friday: Behavioral and Instructional Sequence Monday: Behavioral and Instructional Sequence Tuesday-Friday: continue with instructional sequence as needed. Begin post-testing on instructional and behavioral objectives

35 Behavioral pre-testing: do not change routine, chart data on each account of hitting peers and teachers Mon-Wed Instructional pre-testing: Materials: Flashcards 1-5 Printed chart with numbers 1-5 and space for flashcards directly below Prerequisite skills: Ability to attend to activity for 3-5 minutes (difficult but he can do it) Ability to recognize numbers 1-5 Ability to match sets of numbers (3 to 3 and 5 to 5) Instructional Sequence: Explain to MG that we will be counting. With the teacher sitting across from MG, set the materials between MG and the teacher. Set the flashcards out on the table in random order and the chart facing MG. First demonstrate what MG will be doing. Slowly match the flashcard to the space on the chart below the original number. Continue with each number. Ask MG to do the same. Keep the activity short (up to 5 minutes, with corrections). MG has an extremely short attention span, we will lengthen the activity duration with each lesson. Attempt to length the lessons by 1-2 minutes each day. Over the next three days of testing, vary the materials used for the numbers. Use materials of different textures, such as, carpet, felt, wood, plastic and so on. Try to test MG one time before lunch and one time after lunch. He appears to have better behavior in the afternoons.

36 Thursday Instructional Sequence: Materials: Plain small-med cardboard box, material with numbers on it or numbers cut from felt or cloth, scissors, hot glue gun Prerequisite skills: Ability to attend to artistic activity for at least 10 minutes Some gluing and cutting skills Instructional Sequence: The purpose of this activity is to grab MGs attention with numbers, to help him make this activity his own. We will be making a box with numbers on it, discussing the numbers on the cloth or the cutouts while we are working. Assist MG (hand over hand) with cutting the numbers or the cloth to fit around the box and using a hot glue gun glue the cloth or numbers on to the box. The box will be used to store numbers made from other materials, such as wood, felt, carpet, and whatever else you can find. Friday Instructional Sequence: Materials: Will vary depending on chosen activity (we traced, cut and painted numbers on paper and wood) Prerequisite skills: Ability to attend to artistic activity for at least 10 minutes Will vary depending on chosen activity Instructional Sequence: Additional activities that can be used to grab an interest include, painting wooden numbers, tracing and cutting numbers out of carpet, cloth, paper, paint numbers on linoleum squares, etc.

37 After reviewing the pre-testing information, it was clear that MG did not have any difficulty copying numbers in sequence from 1-5. Interesting note not revealed in pre-testing: MG had a difficult time sequencing paper copies, laminated and not laminated, of the numbers. He was able to sequence the felt numbers, carpet numbers, and wooden numbers. Even when he was copying the sequence he had to be reminded to look again or attend to the activity once or twice. This lesson was changed to meet MGs more critical needs and to place more emphasis on placing numbers in sequential order without a visual prompt and writing (typing) numbers in sequential order. What you see here is the corrected version.

38 The next step we will be taking is to begin a daily contract with MG (see worksheet #3). The contract will be completed everyday and will be in picture format so that MG is able to understand it. MG will be responsible for his behavior contract. He will carry it around in his pocket and will carry it to lunch and P.E. It will eventually be his responsibility to have his other teachers mark off the contract in his other classes. We are starting with three phases of 2 hours each, with the last phase having 3 hours(he rarely has problems at this time because he has P.E. and recess in the afternoons). In the two hour blocks he can either get one happy face or a sad face depending on if he hits his classmates or a teacher. By the days end he will have 6 opportunities to get happy faces, he needs to have 4 of the 6 happy faces to have a prize at the end of the day. We will move this to every hour after MG gets used to marking off the paper and carrying it around. Currently if he has to pull out the paper too many times he will lose it. In addition both teacher and aide will remain in close physical proximity to MG. We will encourage MG to slow down and to think before making rash decisions. Remind him to stop and think about another way to handle the situation.

39 Tuesday Instructional Sequence: Dot to Dot and Patterns Material Used: Printed numbers, wooden numbers, carpet numbers, etc., stamps of numbers and inkpad, blank paper, dot to dot worksheets (easy to make if you do not have any, also MANY available online at various learning worksheet sites). Worksheet with various patterns of the numbers 1-5. Prerequisite Knowledge: Ability to attend to activity for 3-5 minutes (difficult but he can do it) Ability to recognize numbers 1-5 Ability to match sets of numbers (3 to 3 and 5 to 5) Instruction: Review previous activities. Spend 10-15 minutes (on and off if necessary) working on sequencing wooden letters, carpet, etc. MG has severe motor problems, primary due to his CP. For MG, dot to dot worksheets are not practical without assistance. This activity must be worked on with teacher supervision. MG can point from one number to the next and draw a line with hand over hand assistance. Before resorting to hand over hand assistance, have him try to draw the line himself (you can use the eraser end of the pencil). The next worksheet activity has 4 different patterns of numbers 1-5. Have MG locate the correct pattern and draw a circle around that pattern (he may also need hand over hand assistance with this as well).

40 Wednesday Instructional Sequence: Chalk Walk and Drum Beat Material Used: Printed numbers, wooden numbers, carpet numbers, etc., stamps of numbers and inkpad, blank paper, chalk, large sidewalk, drums Prerequisite Knowledge: Ability to attend to activity for 3-5 minutes (difficult but he can do it) Ability to recognize numbers 1-5 Ability to match sets of numbers (3 to 3 and 5 to 5) Instruction: Review previous activities. Spend 10-15 minutes (try to work straight through for 10 minutes and then take a break before beginning the next activity) working on sequencing wooden letters, carpet, etc. Gather your chalk and head outside. Draw the numbers 1-5 on the ground and have MG walk from one number to the next in sequence. To involve the entire class. MG tunics for 5 students to wear. Have them wear their numbers and spread out in the classroom or out on the playground. Have MG walk from the number one student to the next in sequential order. Head on into the music room and pull of the Big drums. Drum 1 time first them 2 times, etc. Ask MG to copy the drum sequence.

41 Thursday Instructional Sequence: Computer Sequencing Material Used: Printed numbers, wooden numbers, carpet numbers, etc., stamps of numbers and inkpad, blank paper, computer with keypad Prerequisite Knowledge: Ability to attend to activity for 3-5 minutes (difficult but he can do it) Ability to recognize numbers 1-5 Ability to match sets of numbers (3 to 3 and 5 to 5) Ability to sequence numbers 1-5 using a variety of materials Instruction: Review previous activities. Spend about 5 minutes working on sequencing wooden letters, carpet, etc. Move over to the computer and begin working on sequencing in order. Before having MG type the numbers in sequence have him move the numbers around into the correct sequence. Set up the screen where numbers 1-5 are on the screen and MG must move the mouse around to place the numbers in the correct order. Begin the first time with just numbers 1-3 and then add 4 and 5. Replay this activity several times. You can include some animals or toys to the screen to attract his attention.

42 Friday Instructional Sequence: Computer Sequencing Material Used: Printed numbers, wooden numbers, carpet numbers, etc., stamps of numbers and inkpad, blank paper, computer with keypad Prerequisite Knowledge: Ability to attend to activity for 3-5 minutes (difficult but he can do it) Ability to recognize numbers 1-5 Ability to match sets of numbers (3 to 3 and 5 to 5) Ability to sequence numbers 1-5 using a variety of materials Instruction: Review previous activities. Spend about 5 minutes working on sequencing wooden letters, carpet, etc. Review sequencing the numbers on the computer for a couple of minutes. Clear the screen and ask MG to type the numbers first ask him to type number 1. Ask him what number comes next, once he tells you number 2, have him find the number 2 on the keyboard. Continue on through number 5.

43 Monday Instructional Sequence: Material Used: Printed numbers, wooden numbers, carpet numbers, etc., stamps of numbers and inkpad, blank paper, computer with keypad Prerequisite Knowledge: Ability to attend to activity for 3-5+ minutes (difficult but he can do it) Ability to recognize numbers 1-5 Ability to match sets of numbers (3 to 3 and 5 to 5) Ability to sequence numbers 1-5 using a variety of materials Instruction: Review all previous activities. Spend about 5 minutes working on sequencing wooden letters, carpet, etc. Another 5 doing the chalk walk, do a dot to dot worksheet, work on the computer. This should be a review day before beginning post testing. Mondays are often difficult and he needs a reminder after the weekend of not working.

44 Tuesday Instructional Sequence: Material Used: Printed numbers, wooden numbers, carpet numbers, etc., stamps of numbers and inkpad, blank paper, Prerequisite Knowledge: Ability to attend to activity for 3-5+ minutes (difficult but he can do it) Ability to recognize numbers 1-5 Ability to match sets of numbers (3 to 3 and 5 to 5) Ability to sequence numbers 1-5 using a variety of materials Instruction: Begin post testing today. Test MG at various times during the day. Work on computer activities in the morning and sequencing hard materials after lunch. Repeat the previous activities he did all last week. Be sure to include a lot of breaks with activities that MG enjoys. Go for a walk around the school or play on the playground for 10 minutes, get away from the math skills, but before changing activities, remind him that he will work on this activity again later. If you have a picture schedule (which we do), set up the picture schedule so MG is aware of what is coming up next.

45 Wednesday Instructional Sequence: Material Used: Printed numbers, wooden numbers, carpet numbers, etc., stamps of numbers and inkpad, blank paper, computer with keypad Prerequisite Knowledge: Ability to attend to activity for 3-5+ minutes (difficult but he can do it) Ability to recognize numbers 1-5 Ability to match sets of numbers (3 to 3 and 5 to 5) Ability to sequence numbers 1-5 using a variety of materials Instruction: Continue post testing today. Test MG at various times during the day. Work on computer activities in the morning and sequencing hard materials after lunch. Repeat the previous activities he did all last week. Be sure to include a lot of breaks with activities that MG enjoys. Go for a walk around the school or play on the playground for 10 minutes, get away from the math skills, but before changing activities, remind MG that he will work on this activity again later. If you have a picture schedule (which we do), set up the picture schedule so MG is aware of what is coming up next.

46 Thursday Instructional Sequence: Material Used: Printed numbers, wooden numbers, carpet numbers, etc., stamps of numbers and inkpad, blank paper Prerequisite Knowledge: Ability to attend to activity for 3-5+ minutes (difficult but he can do it) Ability to recognize numbers 1-5 Ability to match sets of numbers (3 to 3 and 5 to 5) Ability to sequence numbers 1-5 using a variety of materials Instruction: Wrap up testing today. Test MG at various times during the day. Work on sequencing hard materials in the morning and computer activities after lunch. Repeat the previous activities he did all last week. Be sure to include a lot of breaks with activities that MG enjoys. Go for a walk around the school or play on the playground for 10 minutes, get away from the math skills, but before changing activities, remind MG that he will work on this activity again later. If you have a picture schedule (which we do), set up the picture schedule so MG is aware of what is coming up next.

47 Friday Instructional Sequence: Edible Numbers Material Used: Printed numbers, wooden numbers, carpet numbers, etc., stamps of numbers and inkpad, blank paper, Cookie dough, cookie cutters. Prerequisite Knowledge: Ability to attend to activity for 3-5+ minutes (difficult but he can do it) Ability to recognize numbers 1-5 Ability to match sets of numbers (3 to 3 and 5 to 5) Ability to sequence numbers 1-5 using a variety of materials Instruction: FUN DAY For our wrap up, we are making number cookies. Roll out the dough to about ¼ inch thick. Using cookie cutters in the shape of numbers cut the cookies in sequential order. If you do not have cookie cutters in the shape of numbers you can mold the dough into the shape of the numbers. Be sure the students wash their hands and watch MG because he will eat all of the dough! While the cookies are baking count out objects of 5, 5 fingers, 5 toes, 5 eggs, 5 people, etc. When the cookies are finished baking you can decorate them with icing and sprinkles and then eat them in sequential order!

48 12345

49 1 4 5 3 2 3 1 5 2 4 5 3 4 1 2 3 5 2 1 4 1 2 3 4 5

50 Worksheet 3


Download ppt "Robyn Rice Graduate Student Dr. Susan Easterbrooks Georgia State University Methods of Teaching Atypical Deaf Students Pervasive Developmental Disorder."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google