Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Statewide Training for Transitioning Children from Early Intervention (Part C) to Early Childhood Special Education (Part B) To All Trainers: Welcome.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Statewide Training for Transitioning Children from Early Intervention (Part C) to Early Childhood Special Education (Part B) To All Trainers: Welcome."— Presentation transcript:

1 Statewide Training for Transitioning Children from Early Intervention (Part C) to Early Childhood Special Education (Part B) To All Trainers: Welcome to the Statewide Transition Training Module revised September This training is based on the federal mandate IDEA which guarantees a free and appropriate public education for all children and young adults with special needs. IDEA has 2 parts and we are going to talk about Part C for children birth to 3 and Part B for individuals 3 through 21. This is an opportunity to explain IDEA , Parts B and C The revised notes and slides reflect changes in language that are in the revised IL. Administrative Code, Special Education Rules and Regulations, Section 226 and changes that are in IDEA, 2004 and 34 CFR. The handout page titled “Illinois Administrative Code: Special Education Section Definitions” has been changed to account for language changes in the ISBE Rules and Regs and IDEA, 2004. A final revision is on the Resources slide and on the Resources handout page. New resources have been added and the Resources handout page has been reorganized to help participants find relevant documents on the internet. Make sure that your training packets contain the most recent forms for: Transition Tracking Form (4/10) and Procedures (4/10) Consent for Initial Evaluation (04-08) available at (This is a required 2-page form) Illinois Department of Human Services and Illinois State Board of Education

2 Special Thanks Illinois State Board of Education Kay Henderson
Department of Human Services Janet Gully And all of the Statewide Transition Guidance Committee Members Agencies that participated in the Statewide Committee included: ISBE, DHS, Project CHOICES, STAR NET, Illinois Early Intervention Training Program, Child Find, Child and Family Connections, and school districts throughout the state. Developers of training are members of the Statewide Transition Committee, Adapted from a training packet originally developed by Lisa Fisher and Pat Kluzik Stauch, STAR NET Region II Resource Specialists.

3 Statewide Transition Initiative Outcomes
Children and Family Outcomes Smooth and effective transition IEP in place on 3rd birthday Least Restrictive Environment Participant Outcomes Requirements Recommended practices Transition Tracking Form Publication Outcomes “When I’m 3, where will I be? Family Transition Workbook” in English and Spanish. DVD is only available in English at this time Additional publications The complete statement of the Statewide Transition Initiative Outcomes is included as part of the cover page. The full text will be part of the participant’s handouts for the training. This slide is shown just as a reminder to the presenter on what to highlight. Emphasize that in the next slide, the workshop objectives are related to accomplishing the Participant Outcomes.

4 Agenda 9:00 Welcome and Opening Comments
9:45 “When I’m 3, where will I be” DVD 10:15 Overview & Discussion of IDEA ’04 Transition Requirements Transition Tracking Form Evaluation & Eligibility 11:30 Lunch 12:30 Overview & Discussion of IDEA ’04 IFSP/IEP How to Use the Transition Tracking Form 2:30 Final Questions & Discussion 2:50 Summary and Closing comments A full timed-agenda is included as part of the cover page as a handout Review the DVD in advance. The Transition Planning conference is required. Clips you might also want to show include parent support meeting, Domain Review and IEP meeting. Other comments: Explain that the Transition DVD is based on the Family Transition Workbook: “When I’m 3. where will I be?” The purpose of the DVD is to help parents who do not read, or are visual learners. In the morning, we will go over how to fill out Section I of the Transition Tracking Form. In the afternoon, we will go over how to fill out Section II of the Transition Tracking Form. This packet may be reproduced for instructional or training purposes only.

5 Workshop Objectives Compare Part C and Part B of IDEA ‘04 with a specific emphasis on transition, evaluation and eligibility, and IEP development. Identify the perspectives and expectations held by everyone involved in transition: the family and child; the early intervention providers; the early childhood providers. Share strategies that facilitate smoother, successful transitions from all perspectives, across disciplines, and across service delivery models. These are the objectives specific to this workshop. These objectives lead to accomplishing the outcomes of the Statewide Transition Committee outcomes. The workshop objectives are directly related to the Participant Outcomes. In order to accomplish the second objective, it is important to establish, maintain and respect a safe environment for all of the participants. In order to learn from each other, we have to be able to listen to each other – even when we may disagree or when our perspectives are different. For the last objective, this workshop is based on Federal Law – IDEA’ 04 and Federal Regulations, ISBE Special Education Rules and Regs, and DHS Procedures and Policy Manual. We will separate those things that are required from those things that are good ideas or recommended practices. We want you to leave here with a solid and clear understanding of the requirements of transition balanced by lots of good and effective strategies for a smooth and effective transition process.

6 Why Do we Need a Transition Process?
To ensure continuity of services To minimize disruption to the family system Promote child functioning in the natural environment or the least restrictive environment To fulfill the legal requirements of IDEA ‘04 Adapted from M. Wolery in DEC Recommended Practices: Indicators of Quality in Programs for Infants and Young Children with Special Needs and Their Families (1993) In 1993 the Division for Early Childhood set out their recommended practices regarding transition. We had to modify those recommended practices slightly to reflect IDEA ’04, but, basically, the recommended practices of 1993 are still considered good practices today. We have a transition process to ensure continuity: in Illinois, “continuity” does not mean “the same services delivered by the same people”. When a smooth and effective transition process is in place, continuity is established because there will be no break in services – unless the IEP Team and the family choose to put in a break in services. We have a transition process to minimize the disruption to the family. Research indicates that this period of transition is very stressful for families – all change is stressful and transition out of EI represents a huge change to families. A smooth and effective transition process can help to minimize the amount of stress and disruption a family experiences. We have a transition process to plan for and help promote the child’s participation in the Least Restrictive Environment. Planning for Early Childhood Special Ed Services in the LRE is a requirement of IDEA ’04. Finally, we have a transition process because IDEA ’04, ISBE, and DHS all say that we have to have a plan and that we have to work together to ensure a smooth and effective transition process.

7 Why Do we Need a Transition Process?
The Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) requires that states have 100% compliance for the transition indicators in Part B and Part C. Compliance numbers from ISBE reflect a 90% or slightly better rate of smooth and effective transitions. Compliance numbers from DHS reflect an 80% rate of smooth and effective transitions. Both state agencies compile and report their data to OSEP.

8 What do you want to know about transition?
Take the time to record questions from the audience. Trainer might want to refer to the frequently asked questions – that might be in the folder or you could provide the website link Presenters that are given questions that they can not answer can send their questions to DHS/ISBE. A question and answer document has been created and is on DHS and ISBE websites. An additional way of keeping track of questions is to have post-it notes on each table and have a place for a “Parking Lot” – a designated place where people can post their questions during the day and the presenters will use break time and lunch time to gather the questions and address them within the presentation or before the end of the day. Suggestions for facilitating this activity: We know that many of you come in with questions. And, maybe hearing the requirements of ISBE and DHS has raised even more questions for you. We want to write down your questions now and throughout the day so that we can emphasize them and respond to them as the day goes on.

9 Partners in Transition
Parent Child Presentation Notes: Use this slide to find out who is in the audience. Highlight: these are the three required people in the transition process: EI = Service Coordinator; EC= School District Representative transition occurs because children turn 3 years old; not because of parental dissatisfaction with EI services transition relies on and is built upon the relationships that can be created between Parent and EI, Parent and EC, and EI with EC. This workshop is designed to make sense of the legal requirements of transition and to take a look at everyone’s roles and responsibilities. It is also designed to share recommended practices. Recommended Practice: effective transitions are based on the development of positive, communicative, and collaborative working relationships between all of the players represented on our triad model. Early Intervention Early Childhood

10 The DVD The Players: Michelle – Kendall’s mother
There are at least two segments of the DVD that fit nicely into the workshop. Some presenters like starting the DVD at the very beginning. Some presenters prefer to start at the “Chapter 3” mark: the parent support meeting facilitated by Angie, a Child and Family Connections Parent Liaison. Some presenters prefer to show only the Transition Planning Conference. Use the DVD in a way that works for your presentation team. While you are watching this DVD clip, listen for what each person brings to the meeting. What is the relationship between all of the partners? What questions or concerns does each person bring to the Transition Planning Conference? How is information shared? Given what the people said, what might be the next steps Following the DVD, facilitate discussion with participants in partners, triads, small groups or large group. (It may be more challenging to facilitate a large group discussion if the audience size is 50 or more.) Base the discussion on the same questions listed above or additional questions: What did you think of the DVD? What are your thoughts? What is your perspective on the Transition Planning Conference and what each person had to say? What did you see that is similar to or different from your own experiences in transition? In Illinois, the Transition Planning Conference is only one part of the transition process. In order to lead into the Transition Planning Conference, the next part of the workshop takes a look at IDEA ’04 and Illinois requirements for transition. Presenters can use other portions of the DVD if they choose The Players: Michelle – Kendall’s mother Christy – Early Childhood Coordinator Lovice – Early Intervention Service Coordinator

11 IDEA Overview Part C Part B Birth to 3 years Child Find (Birth to 3)
Initiates Transition State Interagency Coordinating Council Sliding Fees/Use of insurance Due Process/ Procedural Safeguards Part B 3 through 21 years Child Find ( Birth through 21) Participates in Transition State Advisory Council Free and Appropriate Public Education Due Process/ Procedural Safeguards Presentation Notes: Full title of Federal Law: Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act, 2004; the final regulations were published in Aug, 2006. It is the differences between Part C and Part B of the Federal law that make transition a sometimes confusing and complex process. Emphasize the points that are in bold type on the slide. In Illinois, transition becomes necessary because Part C of IDEA stops on the child’s 3rd birthday; and for children coming out of EI and eligible for Part B services, Part B begins on the child’s 3rd birthday. IDEA requires that each child have a smooth and effective transition so that the change from one service system to the next happens without causing a delay in services. IDEA requires that each state agency – the Illinois Department of Human Services and the Illinois State Board of Education – work together to ensure a smooth and effective transition. Child Find plays a part in that requirement, because school districts are required to be involved in and to collaborate with Child Find efforts, birth – 21 years. In Illinois, parents are assessed a family fee, based on income and size of family. Families are required to use their insurance, when applicable. Once a child turns 3 and is found to be eligible for special education services, those services have to meet the requirement of FAPE – Free ( at no cost to parents) Appropriate (designed so that the child makes progress on annual goals) Public Education (provided under the auspices of public schools). Sources: FACTS/LRE, Similarities and differences in federal legislation concerning young children with disabilities. University of IL at Urbana-Champaign; IDEA 2004.

12 Transition Requirements
Early Intervention Discusses Transition with Parent at each IFSP 2 yrs 6 mos – Service Coordinator sends information to District with parent consent Service Coordinator contacts District to set up Transition Planning Conference Required - Service Coordinator, Parent, District Representative Sends Transition Tracking form School District Receives Child’s information Participates in Transition Planning Conference Informs Parent of District evaluation practices Completes Transition Tracking Form after IEP Returns Form to CFC Enters transition information on Student Information System (SIS) Since there is shared responsibility for ensuring a smooth and effective transition between the Child and Family Connections office and each School District, many Local Interagency Councils use a Transition Agreement to describe what each person is going to do, when they are going to do it, and what they are going to do when problems occur. The entire Transition process has a beginning – at least by the time a child is 2yrs 6 mos. However, the Transition process can begin earlier than 2 yrs. 6 mos. Situations when you might want to start the transition process earlier may include summer birthdays, complex child or family needs, family preference. The Transition Planning Conference occurs when the child is 2 yrs. 9 mos of age – or sooner based on family request and needs. The Transition process has an ending – the child’s 3rd birthday. Introduce the Transition Tracking Form, Section I only, and the use of the Transition Tracking Form to document the transition process for each child. The School District receives information about a child in Early Intervention on two separate occasions. First, the School District receives Child Find information. The Child Find information is sent from the Department of Human Services to the Illinois State Board of Ed. ISBE then sends the Child Find information to each individual district. This list is commonly referred to as the “27-month” list because it contains information on every child 27 months and older that is receiving EI services. Any district that is not currently receiving their “27-month” list needs to contact ISBE, Early Childhood Division. The second time the School District receives information is through the referral packet that the parent gives signed, informed written consent to share from their child’s EI file and the Child and Family Connections office. The parent signs for consent to send information when their child is 2 yrs. 6 mos. Be prepared to discuss late referrals to EI in conjunction with this slide. Be prepared to discuss late spring, summer, and August birthdays with this slide. Recommended Practices for the School District: Identify someone specifically to receive the child’s referral packet and let the CFC office know who will receive the referral packet. Identify someone specifically to call or send a written thank you note to the parent once their child’s referral packet is received by the School district. Department of Human Services and Illinois State Board of Education

13 Service Coordinator Responsibilities
Provide information to parents Transition Process “Educational Rights and Responsibilities: Understanding Special Education in Illinois” Obtain consent to release or receive information Make referral to School District Signed Consent from parents Send information parent consents to share Transition Tracking Form Inform providers about transition process with family Schedule and attend Transition Planning Conference by 2 yrs. 9 mos. Child and Family Connections Procedure Manual, Department of Human Services Part of sharing information with parents includes talking about parents’ rights under Part B – specifically the right to give informed written consent to share information, the right to have input to the evaluation process, and the right to give informed, written consent to the evaluation process. Additional rights related to transition include the right to participate in a Transition Planning Conference with the Service Coordinator and a representative of the School District; the right to be part of the IEP Team; the right to provide input and information to the evaluation done by the school district; the right to agree or disagree with the decision regarding eligibility; the right to sign consent for the start of services under Part B. Parents also need to know that they can not be coerced into giving their consent; that they must be provided with information about their rights in a way that they understand; and that they can revoke their consent if they change their mind. The responsibility of giving information to parents is shared between the Service Coordinator and the School District. They share the responsibility of making sure that parents understand their rights and that parents know where to go to get additional information or help in understanding their rights. As part of understanding their rights, it is a recommended practice that parents also know what it means to waive any of their rights. Parents need to know what will happen if they give consent and what will happen if they do not give consent. Recommended Practice: The service coordinator or parent liaison will give families a copy of the “When I’m 3, where will I be: A family’s Transition Workbook,” and if needed, a copy of the DVD. This workbook can be very helpful to families if they receive the workbook and/or DVD before their child is 2 years 6 months of age. Additional Service Coordinator Responsibilities include: Update Cornerstone throughout transition activities Inform providers when discharge report is required Forward IFSP updates and reports to School District Enter PA34 when Transition Tracking Form is returned Document all activities throughout transition process in case notes

14 This is the newest revision of the Transition Tracking Form
This is the newest revision of the Transition Tracking Form. Check the revised date on the form you will use in the presentation to make sure it says “Rev. 04/10”.

15 School District Responsibilities
Participate in Child Find, Birth through 21 years Local Interagency Council Transition Planning Conference Explain the evaluation process to parents Domain Review and Parent Input Consent for Evaluation Complete Transition Tracking Form Enter child’s transition information on SIS Form Return Tracking Form to Child and Family Connections (within 20 days after 3rd birthday) Illinois State Board of Education, The website noted above links to several documents and forms that participants might want to be view and/or download. A menu of what the available documents can be used as a handout. The School District shares in the responsibility of providing parents with information about their rights, and their child’s right to an IEP by their 3rd birthday if the child is eligible. An additional responsibility of the School District is to explain their evaluation process to parents. Specifically, the School District needs to explain the parent role in providing input to the evaluation process, their role in the Domain Review process, and their right to a written, informed consent to evaluation. Some districts also have an enrollment or a pre-enrollment process that needs to be completed before any evaluations can be done. The district is responsible for explaining any and all required steps before an evaluation can begin (IL Adm. Code, Sec ) Section II of the Transition Tracking Form is completed after the IEP Team has determined eligibility and written an IEP. The Transition Tracking Form has to be returned to the local CFC office within 20 days after the child’s 3rd birthday; it also has to be sent via fax to the Illinois State Board of Education. Many of the School District responsibilities are summarized in the memo that is in the participant handout packet, “Illinois School Districts’ Responsibilities toward EI Services”. That memo is also available on the ISBE website. Recommended Practice: The school district should send the completed Transition Tracking Form to the local CFC as soon as possible after the IEP Meeting. The School District representative can explain the evaluation process to the parent(s) at the Transition Planning Conference. The School District rep. can also explain any enrollment requirements of the district.

16 Service Provider Responsibilities
Encourage and support families Provide accurate and current information Families School District Learn about School District and Community practices Transition Early Childhood Special Education Services and Programs Other Early Childhood Programs Complete paperwork Progress reports Discharge summaries Participate in the required exit IFSP meeting 120 days before child’s 3rd birthday Adapted from EI Training and Department of Human Services EI Policy Manual Service Providers always have the responsibility of sharing accurate information with families and sharing information about the transition process is no different. Service Providers can help families learn about their child’s strengths and needs and successful strategies that work to help their child. Service Providers can help families understand that services are given differently in Early Intervention and Early Childhood. Most EI services are done through 1:1 services, many times in a family home. Most services in Early Childhood are done in classroom settings, using a team model, embedded in an educational program that may be 5 days a week. Recommended Practice: Service Providers can use the reports that they give to the district as a way of describing what the child can do; how the child uses the skills they have; and what successful strategies have been used with the child. As of July 1, 2006 all service providers will be required to participate in an exit IFSP meeting no more than 120 days before the child’s 3rd birthday. This exit IFSP meeting may be combined with a transition meeting or with a 6-month IFSP review meeting when the review takes place within the 90 day period before a child’s 3rd birthday. The provider should submit the appropriate paper work that is requested by the CFC at this time. A discharge summary is a progress report, not necessarily an evaluation. Providers will verify with the service coordinator what paper work is need for the meeting. When a child’s IEP meeting is held before the child’s 3rd birthday, Service Providers can be invited by the school district on parent request and can attend the IEP meeting.

17 Parent Rights and Responsibilities
Sign informed, written consent or refusal to consent to share information with School District Participate in Transition Planning Conference Share Information Ask Questions Participate in Domain discussion with IEP Team Sign informed, written consent or refusal to consent to evaluation process Participate in IEP meetings Determine Eligibility Write the IEP Based on Illinois State Board of Education, Rules and Regulations, Section 226 It is important for parents to know and use their rights. It is hard for parents to leave the services and the people that have provided them and their child with therapy, education, support and information. And it is hard to prepare for making new relationships with the people that are going to become part of their child’s school life. For parents, the Transition Planning Conference is a time to introduce their child to the school system and the professional staff at school. It is a time to share what parent’s know about what their child can do and the types of things that their child likes the most. Anything that parents can share that describes what their child can do will help the school staff to get to know their child faster and more completely. Use the Transition Meeting Planning Conference and the months that follow to ask questions and become familiar with the school staff and the school and community programs. The Transition Tips in the Family Transition Workbook: “When I’m 3, where will I be?” and on the magnets are good reminders of things parents can do during this period of transition out of EI and into ECSE. Other things parents can do are: Keep notes on what your child has accomplished in EI and how they reached their goals Review the CFC file, IFSPs, evaluation/assessment reports, etc. Visit your School District Early Childhood program and other preschool programs in your community Talk to your Parent Liaison and other parents

18 Transition Planning Conference
What is required? Transition Planning Conference by 2 years 9 mos Attended by Parent, Service Coordinator, Representative of District Smooth and Effective Transition What could be done? Hand over the Transition Tracking Form Review services and progress in EI Start Domain Review process Describe School District evaluation process and services Recommended Practices: Use the Transition Planning Conference to review the services the child has received in EI and the progress the child has made in EI. Use this slide to summarize and emphasize what is required at the Transition Planning Conference and to discuss other things that could be part of the Transition Planning Conference. The Transition Planning Conference can happen as early as 2 years 3 months. It is required to happen by 2 years 9 months. The Transition Planning Conference will not happen later than 2 yrs 9 months unless the child comes to the CFC after 2 years 9 months. Another exception may be if the family initially declines transition and then decides to continue the process. Possible Audience Participation: Ask the audience what else they do at their Transition Planning Conferences.

19 Transition Timeframe The shaded areas of the timeframe show the age of your child during each step of the transition process. If you want some or all of the steps started earlier, talk about your concerns and questions with your Service Coordinator. Transition Steps Every IFSP 2 Yrs. 6 mos. 7 mos. 8 mos. 9 mos. 2 Yrs. 10 mos. 2 Yrs. 11 mos. 3 Yrs. Talk about transition questions and concerns Service Coordinator sends referral packet to school district or special education cooperative with parent’s written consent Service Coordinator sets up Transition Planning Conference Parent, Service Coordinator and School District or Special Education Cooperative Representative attend Transition Planning Conference Local School District or Special Education Cooperative includes parents in Domain Review process School District or Special Education Coooperative completes evaluations with parent’s consent IEP Team, including parents, meets to determine child’s eligibility If eligible, IEP Team writes IEP IEP Team implements IEP This Transition Timeframe is found in the “When I’’m 3, Where will I be? A Family’s Transition Workbook” on page 10. The Transition Workbook and the Transition DVD are 2 tools that service coordinators and parent liaisons can use with families during the transition process. It is helpful for everyone involved in transition to know the various steps in the transition process and be able to answer parent’s questions and concerns about transition and the timeframe for transition.

20 IDEA: Evaluation/Eligibility
Part C State determines Eligibility Parent Consent Nondiscriminatory and Multidisciplinary Assessment Family-directed Parent Participation Part B Categories of Eligibility; Developmental Delay Parent Consent Nondiscriminatory and Multidisciplinary Assessment Assessment of Child Parent on Team Remember, it is the differences between Part C and Part B that add to the complexity of transition. There is a huge difference between Part C and Part B when it comes to evaluation and eligibility. When parents are not informed of the differences in procedures, it can create an unnecessary stumbling block that interferes with a smooth and effective transition process. Eligibility under Part C is determined by each state. In Illinois, the eligibility is 30 % developmental delay in one or more developmental areas (adaptive behavior, cognition, communication, fine & gross motor, social/emotional); clinical judgment with documentation; some pre-approved medical conditions (i.e. Down syndrome, Cerebral Palsy; see pre-approved list by DHS); and certain at-risk factors. If a child is not found to be eligible after screening or evaluation, the parents are given information about other avenues of service in the community. Under Part C, the parent gives informed written consent before the evaluation process begins. The evaluation process is non-discriminatory, multi-disciplinary and family-directed. The evaluation process also looks at family resources and family needs. Eligibility under Part B is determined by IDEA ’04 with each state given the responsibility of coming up with an evaluation process that meets federal law. IDEA ’04 establishes 13 categories of eligibility for receiving special education and related services. Each state can also define and use its own 14th category, “Developmental Delay”. In Illinois, “Developmental Delay” can be used for children through 9 years as an eligibility category on the IEP based on the IEP Team finding the child eligible for services under one of the other eligibility categories. The definition of “Developmental Delay” is: “Delay in physical development, cognitive development, communication development, social or emotional development, or adaptive development (ISBE Adm.Code Section ). There is NO automatic eligibility under Part B. Eligibility under Part C does not directly lead to eligibility under Part B. An example might be certain speech delays or motor delays or sensory processing disorders: If the delay DOES NOT have an adverse affect on the child participating in and benefiting from age-appropriate activities, the child may not be found eligible for special education and related services. The parent gives informed written consent before the evaluation process begins and has input to the evaluation process. The evaluation process is non-discriminatory, multi-disciplinary, and it is designed to gather relevant functional, developmental, and academic information about the child. The evaluation also includes information provided by the parent (IDEA ’04, CFR ). We have to use what we already know about the child coming out of EI and any additional evaluations by the district to determine eligibility for Part B services based on the questions found on the required Consent for Eval form. Sources: FACTS/LRE, Similarities and differences in federal legislation concerning young children with disabilities. University of IL at Urbana-Champaign; IDEA 2004.

21 Part B Categories of Eligibility
Autism Deaf-Blindness Deafness Emotional Disability Hearing Impairment Cognitive Disability Multiple Disabilities Orthopedic Impairment Other Health Impaired Specific Learning Disability Speech or Language Impairment Traumatic Brain Injury Visual Impairment These are the eligibility categories used in Illinois (Administrative Code ). The categories are defined according to IDEA ’04 CFR Section The use of “Developmental Delay” to determine eligibility is allowed in Illinois through the age of 9 years for children that meet the criteria of one or more of the eligibility categories areas AND that experience a delay in one or more of the following areas: physical development, cognitive development, communication development, social and emotional development, or adaptive development.

22 Why Evaluate? Disability? Adverse Affect?
Present Levels of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance Special Education and Related Services? Illinois Administrative Code, Special Education Rules and Regs, S Refer to the questions on the required Consent for Initial Evaluation form available in the handout packet and These questions plus the information from the Domain Review drive the evaluation process of the IEP Team. The first question “Does the child have a delay or a disability?” can usually be answered based on the information that the parent agreed to send to the District. However, the IEP Team has to take that information one step further to answer another question: “Does the child’s delay or disability have an adverse affect on the child’s ability to participate in and benefit from age-appropriate activities?” If the answer to that question is not apparent in the information sent by EI, then the IEP Team must conduct additional evaluations. The remaining questions are necessary to gather enough information to help the IEP Team write the IEP. The IEP Team has to have enough information through the records shared by EI plus any evaluation they do to define and describe the child’s present levels of academic achievement, functional performance, and related developmental needs. It is not enough just to have test scores; the IEP Team needs to know what the child can do, how the child uses their skills, and what the child can not do yet. All of that information goes into answering the final question: does the child need special education and related services to participate in and benefit from age-appropriate activities? Any evaluation procedure has to be provided in the child’s native language or other mode of communication and in the form most likely to yield accurate information on what the child knows and can do academically, developmentally, and functionally (IDEA ’04, CFR and ISBE Adm Code Sec ).And, what are the additions and modifications that the child needs to participate in and benefit from age-appropriate activities? In addition, the IEP Team has to gather additional data to determine whether any additions or modifications to the special education and related services are needed to enable the child to meet the measurable annual goals and to participate, as appropriate, in the general ed curriculum (IDEA ’04, CFR ). Recommended Practice: IEP Teams can use the questions and the Domain Review to gather information from parents before evaluation and to explain the reasons for needing evaluations beyond what EI completed. Many times, parents do not understand why their child needs to be evaluated when they have already been evaluated by EI.

23 First Step in Evaluation
Review of Record Existing Information Information Provided by Parents Assessments & Observations Information Provided by the Child Specialized Evaluations What else is needed? The evaluation process begins with a review of existing evaluation data. This review has been part of IDEA since at least 1997 with the intent that if information is already known about the child that allows the IEP team to determine eligibility and write an IEP, then additional evaluations are not necessary. In Illinois, the review of existing evaluation data is part of the Domain Review, also known as the Identification of Needed Assessments. The review includes evaluations and information provided by the parents, and observations by teachers and related services providers. (see 34 CFR ) Parents can not sign for consent of evaluation until the Domain Review process has been completed and the parents have input to the Domain Review. Districts then have 60 school days to complete the evaluation and IEP process. Districts can determine how the Domain Review process will be completed. However, ISBE requires the use of the 2-sided form titled Consent for Initial Evaluation. The Consent for Initial Evaluation is on one side of the form and the Domain Review or Identification of Needed Assessments is on the other side of the form. Copies of the form are in the participant’s packets; the form can also be downloaded at As part of the Domain Review, the team has to describe the needed assessments or explain why no assessments are needed. That information becomes part of the notes taken on the Identification of Needed Assessments form. New to IDEA ’04 is language requiring that the evaluation be administered in the child’s native language or other mode of communication and in the form most likely to yield accurate information on what the child knows and can do academically, developmentally, and funcitonally.(34CFR, ) Regarding specialized evaluations: it is important to note that the IEP Team must consider all information presented to the Team. But, the IEP Team is not obligated to follow all of the recommendations made by specialized evaluations. IL Administrative Code, Special Ed Rules and Regs, Sec

24 Evaluation Domains Academic Achievement Functional Performance
Cognitive Functioning Communication Status Health Hearing/Vision Motor Abilities Social/Emotional Status These are the domains required by ISBE that are considered in the Domain Review. A child may be evaluated on one or more of the domains as individually determined by the IEP Team during the Domain Review. The Domain Areas are listed on the Identification of Needed Assessment form in the handout packet. IDEA’04 discusses “Functional Performance” in the comments section: “It is not necessary to include a definition of “functional” because we believe it is a term that is generally understood to refer to skills or activities that are not considered academic or related to a child’s academic achievement. Instead, “functional” is often used in the context of routine activities of everyday living. We do not believe it is necessary to include examples of functional skills in the regulations because the range of functional skills is as varied as the individual needs of children with disabilities.” (CFR, 71#156, p ) Note: this slide may mark the end of the AM session. As time allows, this may be a good time to check the questions board or the parking lot to review or address any questions related to the morning. After lunch, there may also be a few minutes to ask if there are any additional questions regarding the morning before getting into IFSP and IEPs. Specifically, you want to look for and ask for any unanswered questions re: transition requirements, transition responsibilities, transition timeline or sequence, and evaluation/eligibility information. IL Administrative Code, Special Ed Rules and Regs, Sec

25 Timeline for IFSP/IEP Development
Part C IFSP Developed within 45 days from referral Part B For children exiting EI Services – IEP in place on child’s 3rd birthday AND IEP in place 60 school days from parent’s written consent for evaluation For children not in EI Services – IEP in place 60 school days from parent’s written consent for evaluation For children transitioning from EI and found eligible for special education and related services, IL requires that the IEP be in effect on the child’s 3rd birthday (IL Admin. Code, Sec ) OSEP requires that school districts meet the timeline of 60 school days from consent for evaluation (which includes review of records) AND meets the IEP in place on the 3rd birthday timeline.

26 IFSP/IEP Comparison Part C Part B IFSP Document IEP Document
Coordinated, Comprehensive Plan Child and Family Needs Family-Centered EI Services for Child and Family Parent Consent Family determines priorities Part B IEP Document Academic Achievement Functional Performance Special Education and Related Services for Child IFSP Optional Parent Consent Decisions made by IEP Team Parents are IEP Team Members Start of Initial Services The Individualized Family Service Plan and the Individualized Education Plan are similar to the extent that both are individualized, both are written by teams, and both are designed so that children grow and learn and succeed. However, they also have several differences that become the most noticeable when a child is transitioning out of EI and into ECSE. It is important that everyone involved in transition know and understand how these two documents are distinctively different. After reviewing the points of the IFSP and IEP documents, highlight difference in Parent Consent: when a parent signs consent at each IFSP meeting, the parent signature gives consent to services starting or continuing. Under Part B, the only time the parent signature gives consent to services starting is at the initial IEP meeting. For all other IEPs written after the first one, the parent signature does not indicate agreement or disagreement; it only indicates that the parent was present at the IEP meeting. Some districts may have their own consent for services signature page that they ask parents to sign at each IEP meeting. When a parent does not agree with the IEP, it is important that the parent put their disagreement in writing and have their statement added to the IEP document. School Districts are obligated to explain parent rights and procedural safeguards to parents. They are also required to tell parents where they can get additional information and explanation on their rights. IDEA, 2004, Part C (Sec.636 ) and Part B (Sec. 614 d)

27 IFSP and IEP Teams Part C Part B IFSP Meeting IFSP Team Parents
Service Coordinator Service Providers Evaluators Part B IEP Meeting IEP Team Parents Regular Educator Special Educator School District Representative Interpret Test Results Others An IEP Team meeting very often has more people in attendance than and IFSP meeting. For many parents, their initial IEP meeting is daunting and overwhelming because of the number of people present and because of all of the information that is shared at the initial IEP meeting. In Illinois, an Early Childhood Special Education teacher who is also certified in Early Childhood can fulfill both the roles of the General Educator and the Special Educator as a last resort. Preferably, the IEP Team would have one Early Childhood Special Education teacher and one Early Childhood teacher. The Early Childhood teacher could come from the Pre-K at Risk program if the district has one; other options could be teachers from Head Start or community preschools in the district. New language in IDEA ’04 states “In the case of a child who was previously served under Part C, an invitation to the initial IEP Team meeting must, at the request of the parent, be sent to the Part C service coordinator or other representatives of the Part C system to assist with the smooth transition of services” (34CFR (f)). Although this was a practice by many school districts, IDEA’04 has put in specific language to make sure that Service Coordinators and others are invited to be present at the initial IEP meeting if the parent requests. Suggested Practice: The Service Coordinator, School District Representative or a member of the IEP Team can review a blank IEP form with the parent before the IEP meeting as a way of preparing the parent for the meeting. Suggested Practice: Parents could write and submit their own report based on what their child can do, and what they would like their child to learn next. Parents can also contribute information about how their child seems to learn the best. IDEA, 2004, Part C (Sec.636 ) and Part B (Sec. 614 d)

28 IFSP and IEP Content Part C Part B Statement of: Development
Measurable Results or Outcomes Services Transition Steps Outcomes and Strategies Part B Statement of: Present Levels Impact of Disability Special Education and Related Services Program Modifications or Supports Annual Measurable Goals Academic and Functional Short Term Measurable Objectives IDEA 2004 rephrased Present Levels to include: Present level of academic achievement and functional performance including how the disability affects the child’s participation in appropriate activities. (IDEA 2004, CFR, section ) Impact of Disability: how does the child’s disability get in the way of the child having access to, participating in, and benefiting from age-appropriate activities? Special Education and Related Services: what are the special education and related services that the child needs in order to have access to, participate in, and benefit from age-appropriate activities and make progress on their goals and objectives? Program Modifications and Supports: what are the modifications and supports that the child needs in order to have access to, participate in, and benefit from age-appropriate activities and make progress on their goals and objectives? And, what are the supports or training that the teacher or staff need in order to help the child make progress? The annual measurable goals include academic and functional goals; ISBE requires that benchmarks or objectives are part of each IEP. In the directions for completing an IEP, ISBE states that annual goals are written in objective and measurable teams that describe what the child should be able to accomplish in the next 12 months. The annual goal must reflect consideration of the Illinois Early Learning Standards. Objectives/benchmarks are statements of the intermediate steps between the students present levels of performance and annual goals; objectives/benchmarks are written in measurable terms. IDEA, 2004, Part C (Sec.636 ) and Part B (Sec. 614 d)

29 IFSP and IEP Content Part B Part C Natural Environment
Least Restrictive Environment Periodic Progress Reports Annual Review, 3-yr Re-Eval Transition services at 14 1/2 years in Illinois Part C Natural Environment Collaboration with family and service providers Family evaluation of progress 6-Month and Annual Review Transition discussed The Least Restrictive Environment is a required discussion for the initial IEP and all subsequent IEP meetings. Extended School Year Services are also an area of required discussion at the initial IEP and all subsequent IEPs. Extended School Year Services are individually determined by the IEP Team and they are not based solely on the concept of “regression and recoupment” . Refer to the memo by ISBE, November, 2001, July 26, 2005 (www.isbe.net/spec-ed/) Periodic Progress Reports: the IEP must specify how the child’s progress on their annual goals and short term objectives will be measured and how frequently progress reports will be given to the parents. Under Part B, the IEP is reviewed on an annual basis. However, any member of the IEP Team – including parents – can request an IEP Review at any time during the year to address any changes that have an impact on the child at school, new information about the child or new evaluations, or a lack of progress. There may be additional reasons for someone to request an IEP Review. IDEA, 2004, Part C (Sec.636 ) and Part B (Sec. 614 d)

30 IEP Considerations The IEP Team shall consider:
Strengths of the child Parents concerns for enhancing their child’s education Results of initial or most recent evaluation Academic, developmental and functional needs IDEA ’04, Sec 614(d) Individualized Education Programs When the IEP is written, it is based on these 4 points. Some IEP forms have space for writing down the IEP Team and the Parent comments for each of these considerations. It is important to note that the IEP document can not be written based solely on the child’s needs or delays. The evaluation process – and all of the reports that go into the evaluation process – also need to provide enough information about the child’s strengths before the IEP can be written. The IEP Team can use the IEP document to record what the child can do, what supports and practices have been most successful for the child, and how the child uses their skills.

31 Related Services Developmental, Corrective, and Supportive Services
Designed to enable child to receive FAPE Determined by the IEP Team Benefit from Special Education Provided by the Public School District IDEA, 2004, Sec. 602 (26) The phrase “Educationally Relevant” is often used to describe related services under Part B. Many parents become concerned that their child will lose services when they leave EI. It is not a matter of losing services as much as it is a requirement under Part B that services be individually determined to meet a child’s right to receive a Free and Appropriate Public Education. “Appropriate” has been defined to mean an education where the child has access to and makes progress in age-appropriate activities (for children 3-5) and to the general education curriculum (for children from Kindergarten through 21). “Educationally Relevant” means that all related services are decided based on the individual child’s need to receive services so that the child can have access to and make progress in age-appropriate activities and their IEP annual goals. The other part of related services that is different under Part B is the delivery of the services. Services are often integrated into the classroom setting as opposed to isolated in 1:1 settings removed from the least restrictive environment. When an integrated service delivery model is used with a transdisciplinary team structure, everyone on the team helps to implement the services that the child needs. So, a child that needs speech therapy benefits from the speech therapist being in the classroom, observing how the child is using their communicative and language skills within the daily routines of the class, providing therapy in the classroom setting whenever possible, and teaching all of the other team members how to support the child’s communicative and language skill development. A child that attends a 5-day a week, 2 ½ hour Early Childhood program that uses transdisciplinary teaming and integrated services actually ends up receiving more education and more support for their skill development than a child that is just seen on a 1:1 basis outside of a classroom setting. Recommend Practice: School districts can use the Transition Meeting and the transition process to describe how they use recommended practices such as integrated service delivery and transdisciplinary teaming in creating quality Early Childhood programs. A good resource on recommended practices can be found through the Division for Early Childhood at Recommended Practice: IEP Teams can address related services by asking – what services does this child need in order to make progress on their annual goals and in order to have access to and make progress in age-appropriate activities? An excellent resource on understanding Related Services can be found the National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities at

32 Least Restrictive Environment
To the maximum extent appropriate, students with disabilities ages , are educated with children who are not disabled. Least Restrictive Environment is a required part of the IEP process. It is part of ISBE State Performance Plan to increase the number of children receiving their special education and related services in environments that have children with and without disabilities learning together. ISBE, 2001, A parent’s guide: The educational rights of students with disabilities See also: ISBE Special Education Rules and Regs, Sec ; Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act, 2004, Sec 612 (5)

33 LRE (continued) Special classes, separate schooling, or other removal
of children with disabilities from the regular education environment should occur only if the student’s IEP Team determines that the nature or severity of the disability is such that education in a regular classroom setting, even with the use of supplemental aids and services, cannot be achieved satisfactorily. ISBE, 2001, A parent’s guide: The educational rights of students with disabilities.

34 Placement Decisions Individually Determined
General Education Classroom First Strong Preference First Presumption Supplementary Aids and Services Aids, services and other supports Provided in regular education classes To enable children with disabilities to be educated with non-disabled children To the maximum extent appropriate Illinois Administrative Code, Special Education Rules and Regs, S Highlight that it is the presumption of IDEA ’04 that the first classroom considered for each child with a special need is the general education classroom. For Early Childhood, “general education classroom” means the place where the child can have access to and participate in age-appropriate activities with children that do not have disabilities. “Supplementary aids and services” means more than just providing a 1:1 teaching assistant for a child. The discussion of supplementary aids and services needs to go beyond just requesting a 1:1 assistant.

35 Transition Tracking Form
After the IEP meeting, the school district is required to Complete the Transition Tracking Form. The completed Transition Tracking Form is sent to the appropriate CFC office. Child’s transition information is entered on the SIS form. The Transition process has an ending – the child’s 3rd birthday. If the child is eligible for special education and related services, the IEP will be in effect by the 3rd birthday (ISBE Administrative Code, Sec ) Department of Human Services and Illinois State Board of Education

36 Make sure the form you are using in your presentation is dated “Rev
In this example, the child Jimmy Smith, is found “not eligible” for special education services. The date of the IEP meeting to determine eligibility is written down AND the date for the IEP completion is left blank. In this example, the school district also added the words “not eligible” under the “Date Special Education Determined” line just for added clarification. It is not required to specify “not eligible”.

37 Rev 10/09, Statewide Transition Training
IN this example, the child Alice Miller is found eligible for special education services. Her IEP completion date is written in and her IEP services begin on her 3rd birthday. Rev 10/09, Statewide Transition Training

38 Keys to Effective Transitions
Pre-planning Communication Agencies Teachers Parents Service Providers Shared Information and Trust Empower Parents Least Restrictive Environment Evaluate and Modify

39 Training Packet Resources
Illinois State Board of Education Department of Human Services National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities PACER Center See the full list of resources and website connections that is included as part of the cover page document. This slide is just a reminder to the presenter to mention resources, who to call with questions, and where to go to get additional or supporting information. There is a Q & A document on Early Intervention Outcomes that has some information related to transition. The document can be found at


Download ppt "Statewide Training for Transitioning Children from Early Intervention (Part C) to Early Childhood Special Education (Part B) To All Trainers: Welcome."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google