Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

IDEA 2004: Issues, Implications and Strategies in the Development of Transition Plans and Understanding State Performance Plan Indicators 13 & 14 Lecture.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "IDEA 2004: Issues, Implications and Strategies in the Development of Transition Plans and Understanding State Performance Plan Indicators 13 & 14 Lecture."— Presentation transcript:

1 IDEA 2004: Issues, Implications and Strategies in the Development of Transition Plans and Understanding State Performance Plan Indicators 13 & 14 Lecture Notes: Presented by: Illinois Special Education Leadership Academy & Illinois State Board of Education “Only those who will risk going too far can possibly find out how far one can go.” T.S. Eliot

2 Illinois State Performance Plan, Part B Years 2005 - 2010
Monitoring Priority: Effective General Supervision Part B/Effective Transition Indicator 13 (NEW) – Percent of youth age 16 and above with an IEP that includes coordinated, measurable annual IEP goals and transition services that will reasonably enable the student to meet the post-secondary goals. Measurement: # of youth with disabilities aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes coordinated, measurable, annual IEP goals and transition services that will reasonably enable the student to meet the post-secondary goals # of youth with an IEP age 16 and above Multiplied by 100

3 Illinois State Performance Plan, Part B Years 2005 - 2010
Monitoring Priority: Effective General Supervision Part B/Effective Transition Indicator 13 (NEW) – Percent of youth age 16 and above with an IEP that includes coordinated, measurable annual IEP goals and transition services that will reasonably enable the student to meet the post-secondary goals. Measurable and Rigorous Target: 100% New indicator – baseline data are due with the FFY 05 ( ) Annual Performance Report (APR) due February 1, 2007. Baseline data: 2005 – 2006 Aggregate data for students with IEP’s age 16 and older For 2006 – 2007 data, districts will submit their information using the FACTS data collection system contained within the IEPoint system developed by the Harrisburg Project. Illinois rules and regulation require districts to input Indicator 13 data for all transition-aged students – age 14 ½ and older. Data will be disaggregated to complete the requirements of federal reporting.

4 Illinois State Performance Plan, Part B Years 2005 - 2010
Monitoring Priority: Effective General Supervision Part B/Effective Transition Indicator 14 (NEW) – Percent of youth who had IEPs, are no longer in secondary school and who have been competitively employed, enrolled in some type of post-secondary school, or both, within one year of leaving high school. Measurement: # of youth who had IEPs, are no longer in secondary school and who have been competitively employed, enrolled in some type of postsecondary school, or both, within one year of leaving high school # of youth assessed who had IEPs and are no longer in secondary school Multiplied by 100 Indicator 14 of the Illinois State Performance Plan (SPP), Part B for , requires the state to collect post secondary outcomes data on students with disabilities one year after leaving school (i.e. students who graduate, dropout, or age out). Selected districts will be given a list of students who are to be contacted by the district to administer the Post-School Survey developed by the National Post School Outcomes Center. All districts will eventually be required to participate in this survey. Selection each year will be based upon total enrollment. During the school year, Small Unit districts will be required to administer this survey to students with IEPs who left school during the school year. For districts with 35 or fewer school leavers, all school leavers need to be contacted for this survey. Districts with more than 35 school leavers will be required to survey a proportionate sample of their school leavers, which will be provided to the district by ISBE. Districts will be required to contact these school leavers, administer the survey, and report the results back to ISBE between April and September of the year the district is selected. ISBE is currently working with Harrisburg Project to develop a web application which districts will use to report survey results. Further details will be communicated through memorandums as the details are finalized. Cohort 1 – Small Unit Districts Cohort 5 - Chicago Public Schools (20% of district high schools) Cohort 2 – Medium Unit Districts Cohort 5 - Chicago Public Schools (20% of district high schools) Cohort 3 – Large Unit Districts Cohort 5 - Chicago Public Schools (20 % of district high schools) Cohort 4 – High School Districts Cohort 5 - Chicago Public Schools (20% of district high schools)

5 Illinois State Performance Plan, Part B Years 2005 - 2010
Monitoring Priority: Effective General Supervision Part B/Effective Transition Indicator 14 (NEW) – Percent of youth who had IEPs, are no longer in secondary school and who have been competitively employed, enrolled in some type of post-secondary school, or both, within one year of leaving high school. Measurable and Rigorous Target: New indicator – baseline data are due with the FFY 06 ( ) Annual Performance Report (APR) due February 1, 2008.

6 Transition Planning A dynamic process involving a partnership of consumers, school-age services, post-school services, and local communities that results in maximum levels of employment, integration, and community participation for youth with disabilities. Lecture Notes: Elaborate briefly in your own words to cover the following points: ▶ Transition planning is ongoing ▶ Requires a partnership ▶ Is results-oriented IDEA 2004 states that “all children with disabilities have available to them a free appropriate public education …to meet their unique needs and prepare them for further education, employment, and independent living.” IDEA 2004, Section 601(C)(d)(1)(A)

7 Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004
Changes in the purpose of IDEA The purpose of IDEA is to ensure that all children with disabilities have available to them a free and appropriate public education (FAPE) that emphasizes special education and related services designed to meet their unique needs and prepare them for further education, employment and independent living. Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 [601(d)(1)(A)]

8 IDEA 2004 Federal Definition of Transition
Transition services means a coordinated set of activities for a child with a disability that: 1. is designed within a results-oriented process, that is focused on improving the academic and functional achievement of the child with a disability to facilitate movement from school to post school activities, including post-secondary education, vocational education, integrated employment, continuing and adult education, adult services, independent living or community participation… 34CFR §300.43(a)(1) Lecture Notes: Note the key terms in this portion of the definition: Coordinated – means that in order to be results-oriented, activities and services on the IEP must be coordinated between schools, families, students and non-school service providers. Results-oriented – means that the activities and services on the IEP must be designed to assist the student in achieving successful school and post-secondary results in employment, socialization, community access and independent or supported living.

9 Federal Definition of Transition
Is based on the individual child’s needs, taking into account the child’s strengths, preferences and interests; and 34CFR §300.43(2) Lecture Notes Prior to transition age, IEPs primarily address student educational deficits. The IEP for a transition-aged child must also reflect student strengths, preferences and interests. Research in transition issues tells us that addressing a child’s preferences and interests increases the likelihood that he/she will become engaged in their education and transition plans. Engagement increases the likelihood of students graduating with a regular high school diploma and decreases the likelihood of dropping out and school failure.

10 Federal Definition of Transition
Includes Instruction Related Services Community Experiences The development of employment and other post-school adult living objectives; and If appropriate, acquisition of daily living skills and functional vocational evaluation 34CFR §300.43(2) Lecture Notes While instruction and related services are typically included on most IEPs, preparing a student for transition from school to adult life necessitates the development and use of a coordinated set of activities that includes additional services and linkages based on each child’s specific goals for adult life. This coordinated set of activities includes the following components: - Community experiences- encompasses services to both prepare a student for adult community life and to support the student’s community involvement while still in school. - Ask the audience: Why are community experiences so important for students with disabilities? - Answer: Research shows that community experiences are among the top predictors of success after high school for students with disabilities (SRI International). - Development of employment and adult living objectives- goals in the areas of employment, secondary training/education, and adult living must be developed as part of the IEP process- community based adult goals are preferable whenever possible. - Daily Living Skills (if needed)- 2 scenarios are common for students with disabilities, they are tracked into either a daily living curriculum to the exclusion of academics, or into an academic curriculum to the exclusion of daily living skills. Many students require a mixture/blend of both! - Functional Vocational Evaluation (if needed)- this means observing a student in an employment setting and determining areas of skill and areas that require improvement, with the intent of providing services to increase job skills in areas that need improvement. It is important to keep each child’s ultimate goals as the central focus as the coordinated set of activities is developed. We have to begin to ask, “How can I coordinate these activities to support the achievement of Joe’s goals, parallel learning standards and enable him to participate in the most natural settings with the most natural supports?” Then, we search for the resources to answer this question. This process will become clearer as we move through this module.

11 Federal Definition of Transition
Transition services for children with disabilities may be special education, if provided as specially designed instruction, or a related service, if required to assist a child with a disability to benefit from special education. 34CFR §300.43(b)

12 Beginning no later than the first IEP to be in effect when the child is 16 . . .
each student must have included in the IEP appropriate measurable post-secondary goals based on age appropriate transition assessments related to: training, education, employment, and, where appropriate independent living skills. Lecture Notes: Transition planning should prepare youth with disabilities for a broad array of post-school outcomes including post-secondary education, vocational educational education, integrated and supported employment, continuing and adult education, adult services, independent living or community participation. IDEA 2004 continues to support students as team members of their Individualized Education Program (IEP) teams. Teachers, therefore, need to know how to help students become actively involved in the IEP process. 34CFR § (b)(1)

13 AND… The transition services (including courses of study) needed to assist the child in reaching those goals. Beginning not later than 1 year before the child reaches the age of majority under state law, a statement that the child has been informed of the child’s rights under this title, if any, that will transfer to the child on reaching the age of majority. 34CFR § (b)(2)

14 Additional Requirement Eligibility termination and the SOP
For a child whose eligibility ends, a public agency must provide the child with a summary of the child’s academic achievement and functional performance, which shall include recommendations on how to assist the child in meeting the child’s postsecondary goals. Graduation with a regular diploma Exceeding the maximum age of eligibility 34CFR § (e)(3)

15 Failure to meet transition objectives…
If a participating agency, other than the public agency, fails to provide the transition services described in the IEP, the public agency must reconvene the IEP Team to identify alternative strategies to meet the transition objectives for the child set out in the IEP. 34CFR § (c)

16 Transition Planning in Illinois
14 CURRENT RULE The IEP for a student who has reached the age of 14 shall also include a description of the student’s transition service needs under the applicable components of the IEP, with specific reference to the student’s courses of study. 14 1/2 PROPOSED RULE Beginning not later than the first IEP to be in effect when the child turns 14 ½, and updated annually thereafter, the IEP shall include: Appropriate, measurable post-secondary goals based upon age-appropriate assessments related to education, training, employment, and, where appropriate, independent living skills Transition services that are needed to assist the child in reaching those goals, including courses of study and any other needed services to be provided by entities other than the school district

17 PROPOSED Illinois Special Education Rules Graduation or Completion of Program
An eligible student who requires continued public school educational experience to facilitate his or her integration into society shall be eligible for such services through age 21, inclusive, i.e., through the day before the student’s 22nd birthday. Current rule, “through 21” The provision of FAPE is not required with respect to a student with a disability who has graduated with a regular high school diploma. Students who have participated in a graduation ceremony but have not been awarded regular high school diplomas continue to be eligible to receive FAPE through age 21, inclusive. Illinois Special Education Rules, Section (c)

18 PROPOSED Illinois Special Education Rules Graduation or Completion of Program
A student with a disability who has fulfilled the minimum state graduation requirements shall be eligible for a regular high school diploma. If the student’s IEP prescribes special education, transition planning, transition services or related services beyond that point, issuance of that diploma shall be deferred so that the student will continue to be eligible for those services. If the student is to receive a regular high school diploma, at least one year prior to the anticipated date of its issuance, both the parent and the student shall receive written notification (34 CFR ) that eligibility for public school special education ends following the granting of a diploma and that an IEP meeting may be requested to review the recommendation that the student receive a regular diploma. - A student with a disability who has fulfilled the minimum state graduation requirements shall be eligible for a regular high school diploma. ** set forth in Section of the School Code [105 ILCS 5/27-22]. If the student’s IEP prescribes special education, transition planning, transition services or related services beyond that point, issuance of that diploma shall be deferred so that the student will continue to be eligible for those services. If the student is to receive a regular high school diploma, at least one year prior to the anticipated date of its issuance, both the parent and the student shall receive written notification (34 CFR ) that eligibility for public school special education ends following the granting of a diploma and that the parent or the student (if Section of this Part applies) may request an IEP meeting to review the recommendation that the student receive a regular diploma. Illinois Special Education Rules, Section (c)

19 “If …one cannot change a situation that causes his suffering, he can still choose his attitude.”
Frankl, V.E. (1984). Man’s search for meaning. NY: Touchstone. Segue Introduce the next slide and collaboration with this quotation from Viktor Frankl. Viktor E. Frankl Man’s Search for Meaning. pg. 172

20 “Change your thoughts and you change your world
“Change your thoughts and you change your world.” Norman Vincent Peale “We must become the change we want to see.” Mahatma Gandhi “I want to change the world. But I have found that the only thing one can be sure of changing is oneself.” Aldous Huxley “People are changed not by coercion or intimidation, but by example.” unknown “No pessimist ever discovered the secret of the stars or sailed an uncharted sea or opened a new doorway for the human spirit.” Helen Keller “She was unaware of my limitations.” Helen Keller To improve results for individuals with disabilities, school, community, consumers and families must work creatively and collaboratively. Services exist in every community. If we use person-centered planning to provide the framework for our formal plans, if we cultivate relationships with each other and combine successful teamwork methods with the services available, we can build bridges and create dynamic plans that lead to successful outcomes for individuals with disabilities. The payoff to effective community transition team work is to see the vision become a reality: empowered youth with disabilities access the community of their choice to achieve their desired employment, life-long learning and a rich quality of life. DeFur, S. H. (2003) Parents as collaborators: Building partnerships with school-based and community-based providers. In D. Wandry and A. Pleet (Ed.). A practitioner’s guide to involving families in secondary transition. (pp ). Arlington, VA: Council for Exceptional Children. Review with participants the materials and resources included in the binder under the Resources/Reading section. Thank you! Please complete the evaluation form and submit to your facilitator or return to: TOTAL Project, Illinois State Board of Education Division of Special Education, 100 North First Street N253, Springfield, IL

21 Transition: Centerpiece of the IEP
Understanding Measurable Post-Secondary Goals Transition: Centerpiece of the IEP Introduce yourself and present the training objective and key learning. The purpose of this training is to increase understanding of an IEP transition planning process that will: 1) focus and coordinate the IEP planning, discussion and decision-making toward preparation for the adult world; 2) organize IEP development into steps that are interrelated and build upon each other; and, 3) result in a comprehensive, dynamic and coordinated program reflecting the student’s vision for adult life. Key Learning: Be familiar with the components of IDEA that pertain to transition planning and how they fit into the bigger picture of IEP development and implementation. Demonstrate an understanding of the five step process for writing transition focused IEPs. Understand the role of information gathering tools such as person-centered planning developing transition focused IEPs. Establish a basic connection between the Illinois Learning Standards and the development of a transition focused IEP. Points to cover: To facilitate successful transition planning, all of the discussion and decision-making in the development of the IEP must result in a comprehensive, coordinated plan that meshes all of the pieces of the IEP to prepare young people with disabilities for the adult world. To facilitate this successful planning, participants will learn about and interact with a transition-focused IEP planning process. This process is designed to focus and coordinate the IEP planning, discussion and decision-making toward preparation for the adult world. The steps in this process are interrelated and build upon each other with the result of a comprehensive, coordinated, student-focused plan. Activity 1. ☺ Conduct according to instructions. Participants should be in groups for this activity. Note: The idea is to gain some hands-on experience. Participants should do what they can in the limited time frame but not expect to have a technically complete IEP.

22 Understanding Measurable Post-Secondary Goals
Measurable post-secondary goals are required under the reauthorization of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act 2004. Effective July 1, 2005 In Illinois, any student who will turn 14 ½ during the timeframe of the IEP, or younger, if deemed appropriate by the IEP team

23 Understanding Measurable Post-School Goals
What is a measurable post-school goal? A statement that articulates what the student would like to achieve after high school It is based on the student’s strengths, preferences and interests It is based on age-appropriate transition assessments It is written for the following areas: Education and/or training Education – community college, university, technical/trade/vocational school Training – vocational or career field training, independent living skill training, apprenticeship, OJT, job corp, etc. Employment – paid employment (competitive, supported, sheltered); non-paid employment (volunteer, in a training capacity); military, etc. Adult living (if needed) – independent living skills, health/safety, financial/income, transportation/mobility, social relationships, recreation/leisure, self-advocacy/future planning Each transition-aged student should have a minimum of two post-school goals One for education or training One for employment

24 Understanding Measurable Post-Secondary Goals
How is a measurable post-school goal written? Use results-oriented terms such as “enrolled in”, “work”, and descriptors such as “full-time” or “part-time” Education – Leslie will be enrolled full time at Lewis and Clark Community College. Training – Bob will be enrolled part-time in an emergency medical technician training program. Employment – Lyle will work full time for the fire department, hospital or ambulance service. Adult Living – Steven will live independently in his own apartment or home.

25 Age-Appropriate Transition Assessments
Is the use of a transition assessment for the post-secondary goals mentioned or documented in the IEP or evident in the student’s file? For each post-secondary goal, there should be evidence that age-appropriate transition assessments – formal and/or informal – provided information on the student’s needs, taking into account strengths, preferences, and interests regarding the post-secondary goal

26 Annual IEP Goals For each postsecondary goal, there should be at least one annual goal in the IEP that will help the student make progress toward the stated post-secondary goal. Employment Post-School Goal: Dave will work full time for the fire department, hospital or ambulance service.  Annual goal: In relation to his PLAAFP what does Dave need to work on to move toward this goal…volunteer at the fire department over the summer, work on communication skills, self-determination skills such as teamwork, leadership skills, etc., research each of his desired settings for work load, salary, etc…. Dave will research each of the desired work settings of fire department, hospital and ambulance service and present the results during the first semester tech prep class. If appropriate, add short-term objectives. In this example, short-term objectives could include preparing charts, graphs, information style paper and/or including the presentation of results at the winter parent/teacher conference.

27 Courses of Study Do the transition services include courses of study that focus on improving the academic and functional achievement of the child to facilitate movement from school to post-school? Course of study, instructional program of study or list of courses of study should be in the IEP and should align with the student’s post-secondary goals. Does a post-secondary goal require a certain minimum requirement of courses, e.g., college bound, trade school bound, etc.? Does a post-secondary goal require or benefit from the successful completion of specific high school classes, e.g., a future chef planning to take and completing all cooking related classes, a future child-care provider planning to take and completing relevant classes in Family and Consumer Science, etc.

28 Transition Services Coordinated Set of Activities
For each post-secondary goal, is there (a) instruction, (b) related service, (c) community experience, (d) development of employment and other post-school adult living objectives, if appropriate, (e) acquisition of daily living skills, or, if appropriate, (f) provision of functional vocational evaluation listed in association with meeting the post-secondary goal? Employment Post-School Goal: Dave will work full time for the fire department, hospital or ambulance service.  Annual Goal: Dave will research each of the desired work settings of fire department, hospital and ambulance service and present the results during the first semester tech prep class. Transition Service – Community Experience Coordinate job shadow opportunities at each of Dave’s desired work environments. Implementer: Dave, Tech Prep Coordinator, Case Manager

29 Coordination with Post-School Service Providers (aka adult agencies)
For each post-secondary goal, is there evidence of coordination between LEA and post-secondary services? Is there evidence that the IEP team discussed and listed potential post-school service providers? Is there evidence of family and/or student input regarding potential post-school service providers? Are there transition services listed on the IEP that are likely to be provided or paid for by an outside agency? Was parent consent or child consent (once student is the age of majority) to invite an outside agency(ies) obtained? Is there evidence in the IEP or the student’s file that any of the following were invited to the IEP meeting to discuss transition: postsecondary education, vocational education, integrated employment (including supported employment), continuing and adult education, adult services, independent living or community participation? For those invited post-school service providers who declined and/or were unable to attend the IEP meeting, is there evidence that alternate forms of communication and information gathering were used to support networking/access for the IEP team and specifically the family and/or student?

30

31 Potential Collaborators Looking beyond the typical players
Adult Education Representative – provides information about lifelong education options Advocacy Organization Representative – may offer self-advocacy training or support groups for youth Assistive Technology Representative - provides expertise on devices that can open doors to opportunities At-Risk/Prevention Specialist – offers counseling and support on teen pregnancy, alcohol, and drugs Business-Education Partnership Rep. – provides links between schools and local businesses and industry Community Action Agency Rep. – may link team to resources for traditionally underrepresented groups Correctional Education Staff – provides incarcerated youth with continued learning opportunities Drop-Out Prevention Representative – provides youth with alternatives to dropping out of school Employer – offers insight into expectations; promotes hiring of people with disabilities Employment Specialist – provides job development, placement, coaching Extension Service Representative – offers programs in parenting, homemaking, independent living Guidance Counselor – provides information on curriculum, assessment, graduation requirements, college Heath Department – provides guidance on community health services and health care advice Lecture Notes: When thinking about post-school services or adult services providers, IEP teams have a tendency to focus on the typical “players” such as DRS, PAS agents and perhaps the CIL and IETC’s. The current economic pressures for typical adult service providers and the wide variety of student post-secondary goals and needs makes it very important for IEP teams to widen their lens when thinking about coordinating with post-secondary services. Adapted from NICHCY, TS10, January 1999

32 Potential Collaborators Looking beyond the typical players Continued
Higher Education Representative - provides information on post-secondary services to students with disabilities Housing Agency Representative – assists in developing housing options Leisure Program Representative – knows available program options within the community Literacy Council Representative - coordinates volunteers to teach basic reading and writing skills Local Government Representative – funds many local services; can provide information on local services Parent Training Information Ctr. Rep. – provides training on transition planning and advocacy services to families Religious Community Member – can provide social support to young adults and their families Residential Service Provider – can help access specialized housing Social Worker – provides guidance and arranges for case management, support, respite care Special Olympics Representative – provides sports training, competition, and recreational opportunities for youth Transportation Representative – offers expertise about transportation options and training United Way Representative – funds many community programs that may offer options for young adults Very Special Arts Representative – provides information on art programs and opportunities for youth YMCA/YWCA – offers recreation and leisure programs Adapted from NICHCY, TS10, January 1999

33 Steps for Writing Transition-Focused IEP’s

34 Identify the student’s post-school goals.
What are the student’s preferences and interests in: Employment Postsecondary education, training and other learning opportunities Community participation and mobility Recreation and leisure Independent living Or simply stated… What does the student want to do beyond school? Where and how does the student want to live? How does the student want to take part in the community? Points to cover: Desired post-school goals or vision are based on the student’s preferences, interests and needs. There are three major questions to consider in developing the students’ post-school goals: What does the student want to do beyond school? (Further education or training, military, employment, continuing or adult education, etc.?) Where and how does the student want to live? (Apartment, dormitory, family home, group home, shared apartment, other supported living arrangement, etc.?) How does the student want to take part in the community? (Transportation, recreation, community activities, etc.?) Tie in Person-Centered Planning and the It’s My Life student workbook and how they lay a foundation for this step! Ask participants what kinds of tools they might use to help students identify and learn about their strengths, interests and preferences. You could record answers on a flip chart. Go to the next slide to discuss the variety of tools that might be considered.

35 Identifying the student’s post-school goals Age appropriate transition assessments
Interest inventories Transition surveys Person-centered planning Curriculum-based assessments Structured interviews Social histories Career portfolios Employability skills inventories Assessments of post-school environments desired by the student Adaptive behavior inventories Life skills inventories Aptitude tests Personality scales Social skills inventories College entrance examinations Assessment of technology needs Vocational skills inventories Professional assessments Highlight just a few of these to point out that there are a great variety of tools to assist students in identifying their strengths, interests, preferences and needs. Points to cover: A common myth in transition planning is that there is one transition planning process for all students. The transition planning process must be individualized and suited to the needs of individual students with disabilities. Conduct Activity 2 according to instructions.

36 Age-Appropriate Transition Assessments Documentation
Assessment Type Responsible Agency/Person Date Conducted Report Attached Goal #

37 Keeping in mind… Provide opportunities for students’ to discover what they can and cannot do. Provide opportunities for students’ to discover what they might be able to do with accommodations or further education and training. Provide opportunities for students’ to try out work and life experiences based on their expressed interests. Conclude Step One: Review the three points on this slide Providing these opportunities should be a major role for families, educators and other support persons in helping students find and reach their dreams. Reconvene groups to continue with the next step of Activity 1. Spend approximately 10 minutes or assign time as fits in the training schedule.

38 Post-School Goal Examples
Indicate and project the desired appropriate measurable post-secondary outcomes/goals as identified by the student, parent and IEP team. Goals are based upon age appropriate assessments related to education and/or training, and where appropriate adult living. Post-School Goals Post-Secondary Education and/or Training (e.g., community college, 4-year university, technical/vocational/trade school, vocational or career field training, independent living skill training, apprenticeship, OJT, job corp): Jennifer will attend Southwestern IL College full-time to earn a certificate in child care. Employment (e.g., competitive, supported, sheltered, non-paid as a volunteer or training capacity, military): Jennifer will work full-time at a day-care or pre-school in the local community. Adult Living (e.g., independent living, health/safety, self-advocacy/future planning, financial/income needs, transportation/mobility, social relationships, recreation/leisure): Madaline will pay rent from her SSI to live with her parents in preparation for moving into a shared apartment after 6 months of full-time employment. Madaline will access community transportation independently to travel to college and then to her job.

39 Begin with the End in Mind
Stephen Covey The passion created by shared vision creates synergistic empowerment, it unleashes and combines the energy, talent, and capacities of all involved. To highlight Step One! Stephen Covey “begin with the end in mind” Covey, Merrill and Merrill, 1994

40 Describe the student’s present level of academic achievement and functional performance
Knowing where students are functioning in relation to where they want to go and what they want to do in their adult lives is a critical step in the development of a transition-focused IEP. Introduce Step Two: Describe the student’s present level of academic achievement and functional performance. Points to cover: This step provides the IEP team with a snapshot of the student’s performance at the time of IEP development Student and family participation are integral to the process. The context should be based on the student’s desired post-school goals. Information from this step can be used to identify appropriate accommodations and modifications for courses and assessments. Knowledge about accommodations will be valuable in seeking services in post-secondary education, training and employment. Use a flip chart and have participants brainstorm about what kinds of information they think families and students could provide for present level of performance. When participant comment subsides make sure to point out the following, if not already suggested: Results of summer activities such as a part-time job, recreational activities, volunteer work. Performance of and level of independence in daily living activities such as hygiene, dressing, taking medications, taking care of possessions, etc. Performance and level of independence in household chores and activities such as housecleaning, laundry, cooking, grocery shopping, managing money, etc. Performance and/or participation in after school activities such as a sport, club, volunteering, a part-time job, etc.

41 Design a course of study
Planning regarding courses leading to graduation or completion of a school program Long-range educational plan Courses and other educational experiences that move the student toward his/her post-school goals Emphasize the two-part nature of this step using the points on this slide. To highlight your points, the instructor could use the example of a college freshman. Typically a college freshman will meet with an advisor to develop a four-year educational plan. This plan will attempt to help the student meet required core courses and those needed for completing a major. If a college student does not develop this long-range plan early or they plan courses only on a yearly basis, they may never complete a program of study, never graduate or, at best, graduate on an extended plan. The same need exists for students with disabilities. If a long-range educational plan is not developed early, the student could end up not graduating or graduating without the courses and experiences needed for adult life, further training or employment. Point to emphasize: ★ Actively involving students in the planning of their courses of study could motivate them to remain in school. Reconvene teams to continue Activity 1 Teams should spend 5 – 10 minutes discussing and writing down their work on developing a course of study.

42 Course of Study Example
Year 1 – Age 14/15 Year 2 – 15/16 Year 3 – 16/17 Year 4 – 17/18 Math I Math II Algebra 1 First Aid/CPR English I English II English III English IV World History P.E. American History Government Biology Earth Science Early Childhood Dev. Psychology Keyboarding/ Health Culinary Arts I and II Culinary Arts III and IV Community – Based Empl. Career Exploration Human Services TA in kindergarten classroom

43 Design a statement of transition services
Develop an outcome-oriented plan for adult life that addresses, plans for and coordinates what the student will learn in school and do following graduation or leaving school. Make sure that the student’s needs, preferences and interests regarding his/her desired post-school activities are the focal point of the planning and resulting IEP. There are four concepts that should be considered while planning the “statement of transition Services. Points to cover: The statement of needed transition services is the coordinated set of activities and should be planned with the student’s outcomes for adult life as the focus – outcome-oriented and promoting movement from school to post-school. The coordinated set of activities is based on the student’s needs, preferences and interests and includes each of the components listed on this slide. Instruction Related Services Community experiences Development of employment and other post-school adult living objectives If appropriate, acquisition of daily living skills If appropriate, a functional vocational evaluation

44 Design a statement of transition services continued
Identify who will provide, be responsible for and pay for each activity Identify the dates or school year in which each activity will be addressed and prioritize those activities to be addressed for the coming year Points to cover: While the IEP annual goals and objectives are the sole responsibility of education to implement, transition service activities can be provided by or be implemented by other team members. Activities could be implemented by the student and/or his or her family, other agencies such as ORS, and community service providers such as a Center for Independent Living. Students and families should have an growing level of ownership and leadership.

45 Transition Services continued
What services, supports or programs does this student currently need? What services, supports or programs will this student need in order to achieve his/her desired post-school goals? What services, supports or programs will this student need in order to ensure success as he/she enters the adult world? Is the student linked to the needed post-school services, supports or programs BEFORE he/she leaves the secondary school setting? Point to cover: It is important to take both a short-term and a long-term view of the coordinated set of activities. Therefore, the IEP team should consider the questions on this slide as they plan.

46 Design a statement of transition services continued
Include appropriate individuals from outside the school system “To the extent appropriate, with the consent of the parents or a child who has reached the age of majority…the public agency must invite a representative of any other participating agency that is likely to be responsible for providing or paying for transition services.” (34 CFR § (b)(3)) Specify interagency responsibilities or any needed linkages to access and acquire services and supports. Points to cover: Emphasize the importance of including appropriate individuals from outside the school system and the importance of specifying interagency linkages and responsibilities. Both the statement of transition service needs and the statement of needed transition services are critical planning pieces in the IEP. These statements help ensure that every student will have a better chance of completing school and achieving his or her desired post-school goals. These two elements also help ensure that students are linked to and will receive needed post-school supports, services and programs. Reconvene teams to continue Activity 1 Teams should spend up to 10 minutes developing the statement of needed transition services – just do as much as possible in the 10 minutes. Instructor my allot more time if the training schedule allows.

47 Transition Services continued
Instruction Complete needed courses for graduation Succeed in general curriculum Gain needed skills Related Services To benefit from special education To enter adult world Linkage to adult agencies or providers Use slide 16, 17 and 18 to review possible considerations in developing a statement of needed transition services. Point to cover: Participants will be receiving a handout that provides detailed examples of what could be considered in designed a statement of needed transition services.

48 Transition Services continued
Community experiences Outside school building – in community settings Examples include: community based work experiences, job site training, banking, shopping, transportation, counseling or recreation Employment and other post-school adult living objectives Services leading to a job or career Services that support activities including registering to vote, filing taxes, renting a place to live, accessing medical services and accessing adult services such as Social Security Income (SSI)

49 Transition Services Continued
If appropriate, acquisition of daily living skills Activities that adults do every day including preparing meals, budgeting, maintaining a home paying bills, caring for clothes and grooming, taking medication, etc. If appropriate, functional vocational evaluation Assessment regarding job or career interests and skills Variety of methods including situational assessment, observations or formal measures Point to cover: It is no longer required to write a statement justifying why any of the areas (instruction, related services, community experiences, etc.) is not addressed in the IEP. However, the IEP team needs to consider each area in their planning. Consideration of each of the areas helps ensure that the statement is comprehensive and that students will be linked to the post-school services, supports, and programs they need.

50 INSTRUCTION (If none, indicate “none”):
Tour post-school occupational training programs (2nd year of HS) Develop a monthly living budget (Year 4) Provider Position Provider Agency Goal #(s) if appropriate RELATED SERVICES (If none, indicate “none”): Use augmentative communication device to engage in conversations Explore providers and funders of AT devices for post-school purchase. Research city transportation options. (Year 3, Year 4) COMMUNITY EXPERIENCES (If none, indicate “none”): Investigate participation in church choir. (Year 1) Learn about and visit potential places in the community to shop for food, clothing and access to bank and post office. (year 2, Year 3) Join a community bowling league. (Year 3) Register for classes with the city Parks and Adaptive Recreation Program. (Year 4) DEVELOPMENT OF EMPLOYMENT AND OTHER POST-SCHOOL ADULT LIVING OBJECTIVES (If none, indicate “none “): Meet with DRS counselor for eligibility determination. (Year 3) Participate in job shadowing in area of interest (Year 3, Year 4) Meet with supported employment agencies to identify and evaluate their services. (Year 4) IF APPROPRIATE, ACQUISITION OF DAILY LIVING SKILLS AND/OR FUNCTIONAL VOCATIONAL EVALUATION: Conduct person-centered planning. (Year 1) Contact agencies that provide functional vocational assessments in the community. (Year 3) Provide opportunities for job sampling in the community. (Year 3 and 4) Daily living skills – none needed LINKAGES TO AFTER GRADUATON SUPPORTS/SERVICES: * DRS counselor,

51 Determine annual goals
IEP’s are required to include a statement of measurable annual goals, including academic and functional goals, that meet the child’s needs that result from the child’s disability to enable the child to be involved in, and make progress in, the general education curriculum; and that meet each of the child’s other educational needs that result from the child’s disability. IDEA 2004, [614(d)(1)(A)!i)(II)] Introduce Step Five: Determine annual goals and short-term objectives or benchmarks. Summarize the IDEA requirement for measurable annual goals including benchmarks or short-term objectives. Point to cover: In this step the activities that are the direct responsibility of special education providers require annual goals and short-term objectives.

52 Short-term Objectives or Benchmarks?
Yes, ISBE has proposed to keep short-term objectives/benchmarks in Illinois special education rules!

53 Determine annual goals and short-term objectives or benchmarks
It is important to have a good “fit” between post-secondary goals and annual goals! Carmen will work full-time at a daycare or preschool program. Carmen will volunteer in the district’s preschool program during the 2nd quarter of the school term. Point out the importance of a good “fit” between transition goals and activities and the annual goals and objectives. Use this example or one of your own: One activity in the student’s transition plan under development of career objectives calls for career exploration in the community. The annual goal may then reflect what the student will achieve as a result of this activity, i.e., The student will keep a journal or log of jobs observed, specific tasks and needed skills. Carmen will keep a weekly log of her duties in the preschool and present a one-page paper at the end of the quarter to her Family and Consumer Science class.

54 Transition is the centerpiece of the IEP for students with disabilities no later than age 14 ½
Outcome Oriented Linkages Course of Study Community Experiences Employment and Adult Living Objectives Instruction Summarize the key features: Outcome Oriented Driven by student needs, preferences, and interests Include appropriate courses of study Identify instruction; community experiences; related services; employment and adult living objectives; and, if appropriate, daily living skills and functional vocational evaluation Identify other agencies that may be responsible for providing or paying for needed services Identify, coordinate and link students and families to needed post-school services, supports, and/or programs Functional Vocational Assessment Related Services Interagency Collaboration Student Strenghts, Preferences and Interests,

55 Transition Tree of Influence
14. Percent of youth with IEPs who, within one year after graduation, have been competitively employed, enrolled in postsecondary school, or both. 1. Percent of youth with IEPs graduating from high school with a regular diploma. Arrows indicate direction of influence and leverage across systems and indicators. 2. Percent of youth with IEPs dropping out of high school. Strategies 13. Percent of youth aged 14 ½ or above with an IEP with adequate goals and transition services Outcomes TOTAL TRANSITION MODULES Federal and State Transition Requirements Person-Centered Transition Planning Supporting Student Self-Determination Transition: Centerpiece of the IEP Implementation of Secondary Transition Best Practices Interagency Collaboration and Transition Adult Life Outcomes for Students with Disabilities: A World of Opportunity SSI and Transition Planning Health and Medical Issues in Transition Planning

56 Contacts Susan Walter 618-651-9028 or smwalter@charter.net
Barbara Sims or Scott Beever or Paula Stadeker or


Download ppt "IDEA 2004: Issues, Implications and Strategies in the Development of Transition Plans and Understanding State Performance Plan Indicators 13 & 14 Lecture."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google