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Received from: Dr. Karen Dilka Eastern Kentucky University Date submitted to deafed.net – July 7, 2009 Date submitted to deafed.net – July 7, 2009 To contact.

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Presentation on theme: "Received from: Dr. Karen Dilka Eastern Kentucky University Date submitted to deafed.net – July 7, 2009 Date submitted to deafed.net – July 7, 2009 To contact."— Presentation transcript:

1 Received from: Dr. Karen Dilka Eastern Kentucky University Date submitted to deafed.net – July 7, 2009 Date submitted to deafed.net – July 7, 2009 To contact the author for permission to use this PowerPoint, please To contact the author for permission to use this PowerPoint, please To use this PowerPoint presentation in its entirety, please give credit to the author. To use this PowerPoint presentation in its entirety, please give credit to the author.

2 Helen Adams Keller Character cannot be developed in ease and quiet. Only through experience of trial and suffering can the soul be strengthened, ambition inspired, and success achieved. -Helen Keller By: Bethany A. Berry

3 Helen Keller: The Beginning… Born on June 27th 1880 in Tuscumbia Alabama, Helen Adams Keller was born with full sight and hearing.

4 Helen Keller: The Beginning…contd She grew up in a simple, white, clapboard house built in 1820 by Helens grandparents. She grew up in a simple, white, clapboard house built in 1820 by Helens grandparents. Her parents were Captain Arthur Henley Keller and Kate Adams Keller. Her parents were Captain Arthur Henley Keller and Kate Adams Keller. At the time of Helens birth Captain Keller earned a living as both a cotton plantation owner and the editor of a weekly local newspaper, the North Alabamian. Helens mother, as well as working on the plantation, would save money by making her own butter, lard, bacon and ham. At the time of Helens birth Captain Keller earned a living as both a cotton plantation owner and the editor of a weekly local newspaper, the North Alabamian. Helens mother, as well as working on the plantation, would save money by making her own butter, lard, bacon and ham.

5 Helen Keller Suffered an Illness: A Series of Events… At nineteen months old, Helen fell ill. At nineteen months old, Helen fell ill. The nature of her ailment remains a mystery though doctors of the time called it brain fever. Modern day doctors think it may have been scarlet fever or meningitis. The nature of her ailment remains a mystery though doctors of the time called it brain fever. Modern day doctors think it may have been scarlet fever or meningitis. For many days, Helen was sick and was expected to die. For many days, Helen was sick and was expected to die. When the fever subsided, Helens family predicted that she would be well again. When the fever subsided, Helens family predicted that she would be well again. However, Helens mother soon noticed that Helen was not responding to sounds such as the ringing of the dinner bell nor did Helen notice when Kate (her mother) passed her hand in front of Helens eyes. However, Helens mother soon noticed that Helen was not responding to sounds such as the ringing of the dinner bell nor did Helen notice when Kate (her mother) passed her hand in front of Helens eyes.

6 At nearly two years old, it became apparent that Helens illness had left her both blind and deaf.

7 The Early Years… Helen became a very difficult child. She smashed dishes and lamps, and terrorized her family with screaming and temper tantrums. Helen became a very difficult child. She smashed dishes and lamps, and terrorized her family with screaming and temper tantrums. Relatives regarded her as a monster and thought she should be put into an institution. Relatives regarded her as a monster and thought she should be put into an institution. Helen was six years old when her family became desperate for help. Looking after her was an enormous undertaking and it proved to be too much for the family alone. Helen was six years old when her family became desperate for help. Looking after her was an enormous undertaking and it proved to be too much for the family alone.

8 Enough is Enough: A Timeline of Events Kate Keller reads a Charles Dickens book called American Notes. It discussed work that had been done with another deaf and blind child. Mrs. Keller traveled to Baltimore to see a specialist for advice. The doctor told Mrs. Keller not to give up hope. He believed that Helen could be taught. He advised Mrs. Keller to visit a local expert on the problems of deaf children. This expert, Alexander Graham Bell, was now concentrating on his true vocation: the teaching of deaf children. Alexander G. Bell suggested that the Kellers write to Michael Anagnos (director of the Perkins Institution and Massachusetts Asylum for the Blind.) The Kellers were to request that Anagnos find a teacher for Helen. Anagnos considered Helens case and immediately recommended a former pupil of the institution. A teacher is sent to the Keller's residence.

9 Helens true journey begins…

10 Helen Keller meets Anne Sullivan On March 3, 1887 Anne arrived at the Keller's house in Tuscumbia and met Helen Keller for the first time. On March 3, 1887 Anne arrived at the Keller's house in Tuscumbia and met Helen Keller for the first time. Anne immediately started to teach Helen how to finger spell. The first word Anne tried to teach Helen was Doll to signify a present Anne had brought to give to Helen. Anne immediately started to teach Helen how to finger spell. The first word Anne tried to teach Helen was Doll to signify a present Anne had brought to give to Helen.

11 And The Teaching Begins… Amidst trying to teach Helen, Anne was also struggling to control Helens atrocious behavior. Amidst trying to teach Helen, Anne was also struggling to control Helens atrocious behavior. Anne and Helen moved into a small cottage near the main house with the goal of improving Helens negative behaviors: Anne and Helen moved into a small cottage near the main house with the goal of improving Helens negative behaviors: table manners, brushing her own hair, brushing her own hair, buttoning her own shoes, buttoning her own shoes, and etc. and etc.

12 Annes attempts to modify Helens Annes attempts to modify Helens negative behaviors begot more temper negative behaviors begot more temper tantrums. Anne punished these tantrums by refusing to talk with tantrums. Anne punished these tantrums by refusing to talk with Helen. Anne would Helen. Anne would refuse to communicate refuse to communicate with Helen by not with Helen by not spelling words on or spelling words on or into her hands. into her hands.

13 A Bond Grows Over the next few weeks, Helens behavior began to improve as a bond grew between the two. Over the next few weeks, Helens behavior began to improve as a bond grew between the two. Until now, Helen had not yet fully understood the meaning of words. Until now, Helen had not yet fully understood the meaning of words. When Anne led Helen to the water pump on April 5th, 1887 all that was about to change. When Anne led Helen to the water pump on April 5th, 1887 all that was about to change.

14 The Miracle of Language As Anne pumped water over Helens hand, she spelled out the word water in her free hand. Something about this triggered Helens understanding of language. As Anne pumped water over Helens hand, she spelled out the word water in her free hand. Something about this triggered Helens understanding of language. She now understood the She now understood the meaning of words in relation to meaning of words in relation to objects and people. Anne objects and people. Anne could immediately see in Helens could immediately see in Helens face that she had finally grasped face that she had finally grasped the concept of understanding the concept of understanding language. language.

15 Immediately after the miracle at the pump, Helen asked Anne for the name of the pump and the name of the trellis to be spelled on her hand. Everything she touched all the way back to the house, she asked for the spelling of including Annes name in which she replied with the finger spelling of teacher. Immediately after the miracle at the pump, Helen asked Anne for the name of the pump and the name of the trellis to be spelled on her hand. Everything she touched all the way back to the house, she asked for the spelling of including Annes name in which she replied with the finger spelling of teacher. Within the next few hours, Anne taught Helen the spelling of at least 30 new words! Anne Sullivan Anne Sullivan

16 Making Progress Helens progress from then on was astonishing. She learned how to read with raised letters, She learned how to read with raised letters, She learned how to read Braille, She learned how to read Braille, She learned how to write using both ordinary and Braille typewriters, She learned how to write using both ordinary and Braille typewriters, Michael Anagnos promoted Helen saying that she was a phenomenon, and Michael Anagnos promoted Helen saying that she was a phenomenon, and She was becoming famous! She was becoming famous!

17 The Road to Fame Helen visited Alexander Graham Bell She visited President Cleveland at the White House Helen with Mr. Bell Helen with Mr. Bell In 1890 she lived at the Perkins Institute and continued to be taught by Anne. In 1890, Helen met Mary Lamson who taught her to understand someone elses spoken language by touching their lips and throat.

18 Higher Education In 1894, Helen and Anne agree to attend the Wright-Humason School for the Deaf to improve Helens speech (though never improving much) In 1894, Helen and Anne agree to attend the Wright-Humason School for the Deaf to improve Helens speech (though never improving much) In 1896, Helen moved to the Cambridge School for Young Ladies In 1896, Helen moved to the Cambridge School for Young Ladies In 1900, she entered Radcliffe College, becoming the first deaf blind person to have ever enrolled at an institution of higher learning. In 1900, she entered Radcliffe College, becoming the first deaf blind person to have ever enrolled at an institution of higher learning. Life at Radcliffe was very difficult for both Helen and Anne due to Life at Radcliffe was very difficult for both Helen and Anne due to - the huge amount of work involved and, - the deterioration in Annes eyesight.

19 Helens Accomplishments In 1903, Helens first book, The Story of My Life was published. June 28th, 1904, Helen graduated from Radcliffe College, becoming the first deaf blind person to earn a Bachelor of Arts degree.

20 Helens Life after College In May of 1905, John Macy (the editor of Helens book) married Anne Sullivan. The three lived together in Wrentham, Massachusetts. In May of 1905, John Macy (the editor of Helens book) married Anne Sullivan. The three lived together in Wrentham, Massachusetts. During this time Helen wrote, The World I Live In, revealing for the first time her thoughts on the world. It was also during this time that John Macy introduced her to a new and revolutionary way of viewing the world. During this time Helen wrote, The World I Live In, revealing for the first time her thoughts on the world. It was also during this time that John Macy introduced her to a new and revolutionary way of viewing the world. In 1913, Helen published, Out of the Dark. These works included a series of essays on socialism. The world now knew Helens political views. In 1913, Helen published, Out of the Dark. These works included a series of essays on socialism. The world now knew Helens political views.

21 Helen and Anne Tour the World The following years Helen and Anne went on lecturing tours, speaking of Helens experiences as Anne interpreted. Lectures were followed by question and answer sessions. The following years Helen and Anne went on lecturing tours, speaking of Helens experiences as Anne interpreted. Lectures were followed by question and answer sessions. In 1918, the demand for lectures diminished. Helen and Anne began touring with a vaudeville show which demonstrated Helens first understanding of the word water. In 1918, the demand for lectures diminished. Helen and Anne began touring with a vaudeville show which demonstrated Helens first understanding of the word water. During this time, Hollywood offered the chance to make a film in Hollywood. Deliverance, the story of Helens life, was made. During this time, Hollywood offered the chance to make a film in Hollywood. Deliverance, the story of Helens life, was made.

22 A Move to New York In 1918 Helen, Anne, and John moved to Forest Hills in New York. In 1918 Helen, Anne, and John moved to Forest Hills in New York. During this time, Helen went on fundraising tours to raise money for the American Foundation for the Blind. She also was a major advocate that led to the enhancement of poor living and work conditions of the blind. During this time, Helen went on fundraising tours to raise money for the American Foundation for the Blind. She also was a major advocate that led to the enhancement of poor living and work conditions of the blind.

23 Life Changes In 1921, Helens mother Kate died from an unknown illness leaving Anne as the primary individual in Helens life. In 1921, Helens mother Kate died from an unknown illness leaving Anne as the primary individual in Helens life. This same year, Anne fell ill again followed in 1922 by a severe case of bronchitis. She was no longer able to work on stage with Helen. This same year, Anne fell ill again followed in 1922 by a severe case of bronchitis. She was no longer able to work on stage with Helen. At this point Polly Thomson, who had started working for Helen and Anne in 1914 as a secretary, took on the role of explaining Helen to the theatre going public. At this point Polly Thomson, who had started working for Helen and Anne in 1914 as a secretary, took on the role of explaining Helen to the theatre going public. In 1931, Anne and Polly met King George and Queen Mary at Buckingham Palace. In 1931, Anne and Polly met King George and Queen Mary at Buckingham Palace. On October 1936, Anne Sullivan-Macy died. On October 1936, Anne Sullivan-Macy died.

24 Life Changes Helen and Polly moved to Arcan Ridge, in Westport, Connecticut, which would be Helens home for the rest of her life. Helen and Polly moved to Arcan Ridge, in Westport, Connecticut, which would be Helens home for the rest of her life. After World War II was over, Helen and Polly spent many years traveling the world raising funds for the American Foundation for the Overseas Blind. After World War II was over, Helen and Polly spent many years traveling the world raising funds for the American Foundation for the Overseas Blind. In 1953 a documentary film The Unconquered was made about Helens life. In 1953 a documentary film The Unconquered was made about Helens life. This same year she began work again on her book, Teacher, approximately seven years after the original had been destroyed. The book was finally published in This same year she began work again on her book, Teacher, approximately seven years after the original had been destroyed. The book was finally published in In 1957, Polly Thomson had a stroke and was laid to rest on March 21 st, In 1957, Polly Thomson had a stroke and was laid to rest on March 21 st, 1960.

25 Helen Retreats From Public Life In 1961, Helen suffered the first of many strokes. and her public life was drawing to a close. Nurse, Winnie Corbally, who had taken care of Polly in her last years would also took care of Helen in her remaining years. In 1961, Helen suffered the first of many strokes. and her public life was drawing to a close. Nurse, Winnie Corbally, who had taken care of Polly in her last years would also took care of Helen in her remaining years. However, Helens last years were not specifically quite ones In 1964, Helen was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nations highest civilian award, by President Lyndon Johnson. In 1965, she was elected to the Womens Hall of Fame at the New York Worlds Fair.

26 June 1, 1968, at Arcan Ridge, Helen Keller died peacefully in her sleep. June 1, 1968, at Arcan Ridge, Helen Keller died peacefully in her sleep. She was cremated in Connecticut and a funeral service was held at the National Cathedral in Washington DC. Her ashes were deposited next to those of Anne Sullivan and Polly Thomson. She was cremated in Connecticut and a funeral service was held at the National Cathedral in Washington DC. Her ashes were deposited next to those of Anne Sullivan and Polly Thomson.

27 References Moores, R.F. (1996). Educating the Deaf: Psychology, Principles, and Practices (5 th edition). Boston, New York: Houghton Mifflin Company. St. George, Judith. (1993). Dear Dr. Bell--your friend, Helen Keller. New York: Beech Tree Books. Quotes by Helen Keller About Helen Keller Helen Kellers Life eller.hcsp eller.hcsp America Foundation for the Blind


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