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Www.unisdr.org 1 Disaster Risk Reduction Developments Using the Hyogo Framework for Action CEUDIP Meeting 19-20 November Bonn Paola Albrito Regional Coordinator.

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Presentation on theme: "Www.unisdr.org 1 Disaster Risk Reduction Developments Using the Hyogo Framework for Action CEUDIP Meeting 19-20 November Bonn Paola Albrito Regional Coordinator."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Disaster Risk Reduction Developments Using the Hyogo Framework for Action CEUDIP Meeting November Bonn Paola Albrito Regional Coordinator Europe, International Strategy for Disaster Reduction (UN/ISDR)

2 2 Part 1: Disaster Risk Reduction Global Trends

3 3 Intensive Disaster Risk 82% disaster mortality in 20 large disasters with over 10,000 deaths each, mainly in developing countries 38.5% disaster economic loss in 21 large disasters with over US $10 billion losses each, mainly in developed countries Disaster loss, particularly mortality, is concentrated in intensive risk hotspots

4 4 Global Hotspot study (World Bank) 25 million km sq. and 3.4 billion people are relatively highly exposed to at least one natural hazard; 105 million people are relatively highly exposed to three or more hazards. = lowest 40% = middle 30% = highest 20%

5 5 Global Trends - Disasters are NOT natural Natural and human-induced hazards Climate change and variables (global warming and global dimming) Socio-economic: poverty, unplanned urban growth, lack of awareness and institutional capacities... unplanned urban growth, lack of awareness and institutional capacities... Physical: insufficient land use planning, housing, infrastructures located in hazard prone areas... Environmental degradation ecosystem degradation; coastal, watershed, marshlands…), etc. ecosystem degradation; coastal, watershed, marshlands…), etc. HAZARDS + EXTREME EVENTS VULNERABILITY Natural hazardVulnerability X = Disaster Risk

6 6 WCDR outcome- Hyogo Framework for Action (HFA) 3 Strategic goals 5 Priorities for action Implementation and follow-up Integrate disaster risk reduction into policies, plans and programmes of sustainable development and poverty reduction Recognize risk reduction as both a humanitarian and development issue – in the context of sustainable development Focus on national implementation, with bilateral, multilateral, regional and international cooperation Targets and indicators to be developed according to needs

7 7 Part 2: Progress on the Implementation of the Hyogo Framework for Action

8 8 Progress: HFA Priority Area 1 Political momentum at the national and regional level in all regions Large scale disasters as catalysts for new institutional arrangements and legislation Focus on disaster preparedness and response. Low involvement of development sectors Difficulties in implementation

9 9 Progress: HFA Priority Area 2 Growing involvement in compiling national hazard, risk and loss information Information not yet mainstreamed into planning and decision making Major advances in early warning Difficulties in linking warning to response and national systems to local capacities

10 10 Progress: HFA Priority Area 3 Important progress in introducing disaster reduction into the school curricula in all regions Public awareness programmes Information portals Focused principally on preparedness and response

11 11 Progress: HFA Priority Area 4 Enhancements to building codes and planning standards Incorporation of disaster reduction into poverty and development strategies Limited progress in hazard mitigation and vulnerability reduction Low engagement of private sector; civil society ; financial sector (risk transfer) Lack of integration of disaster reduction and adaptation to climate change strategies

12 12 Progress: HFA Priority Area 5 Widespread progress in improving mechanisms for preparedness and response Strengthening of capacities of both local authorities and communities Local level disaster risk reduction is not addressing risk factors

13 13 First session of the Global Platform June 2007 Part 3: Next steps, follow-up to the Global Platform (Chairs Summary)

14 14 First session of the Global Platform June The need for action is more urgent than ever - growing risk and slow progress in implementing the Hyogo Framework for Action Support to the achievement of a target number of national platforms for disaster risk reduction is needed Investment in risk reduction needs to be substantially increased Countries need to quickly establish systems to monitor and report on their risk profiles and on the implementation of the Hyogo Framework The private sector should be engaged Focus and selection is necessary Supporting country efforts

15 15 First session of the Global Platform June 2007 Climate change Many cities and urban areas are crucibles of growing disaster risk Women are among the most vulnerable in disasters Regional cooperation can play a major role in scaling proven practices Programme focus More effort to engage development partners and other key constituencies An important task is to develop the ISDR systems regional mechanisms, thematic capacities and networking The Trust Fund for Disaster Reduction needs strengthening to support joint work ISDR system development

16 16 GFDRR: Track 1 Global and Regional Deliverables Track 1 Global and Regional DeliverablesGlobal and Regional DeliverablesGlobal and Regional Deliverables Track 2: Country level deliverables Track 2: Country level deliverables Track 3: Accelerated Disaster Recovery in Low Income Countries Track 3: Accelerated Disaster Recovery in Low Income Countries

17 17 Vulnerability of SEE Region SEE is prone to variety of disasters caused by the natural and man-made hazards: Earthquakes (Skopje 1963; Bucharest 1977) Floods (seasonal water surges in Balkans) Landslides (localized, affecting communities) Drought Forest Fire Technological accidents

18 18 Rationale for the Regional Cooperation Many hazards are common to a number of neighboring countries Information sharing will allow for greater reduction of hazard risk at the national and regional level Individual countries may not be able to cope with a major disaster on their own Stand-by, fully equipped emergency response units and relief materials are expensive Countries are small in size and hazards risk insurance may not be optimal at the country level

19 19 To reduce vulnerability of SEE countries, in line with the Hyogo Framework for Action, by building the capacity and promoting a coordinated approach in disaster risk mitigation, preparedness and response. The initiative will build on the existing cooperation in the region, and will complement and consolidate the activities promoted by active organizations and initiatives in the region. Objective:

20 20 Key Areas of the Initiative: Hydrological and meteorological forecasting, data sharing and early warning system Hydrological and meteorological forecasting, data sharing and early warning system Strengthening regional capacities in disaster risk reduction and response Strengthening regional capacities in disaster risk reduction and response Financing of disaster losses and risk transfer mechanism Financing of disaster losses and risk transfer mechanism

21 21 What to do and how to do it: Step 1) Undertake a review for each of the 3 areas of focus; (Get involvement and buying in of national, regional partners) Step 2) Based on outcome review develop project proposal (WB leader); Identify a number of countries to express interest on loans/grants WB as well as committed partners to support the initiative (WMO, EU/EC etc..) Step 3) Implementation phase. (Strengthen sub-regional existing organizations to facilitate the implementation phase in the SEE context)

22 22 Hydrological and Meteorological Forecasting, Data Sharing and Early Warning System Initiative has been agreed during the ICEED meeting in Dubrovnik in May 2006 Strong partnership with WMO Objective of this initiative is to promote a coordinated approach and data sharing in Hydromet services in South Eastern Europe Feasibility assessment has been completed and was discussed in a regional meeting on October 24-25, 2007 in Zagreb Coverage: Moldova, Romania, Bulgaria, Serbia, Montenegro, Croatia, Albania, Macedonia, Bosnia & Herzegovina

23 23 Flood Forecasting and Early Warning System on Sava River Initiative was agreed during Podgorica meeting of the Directors of Hydromet services in Sava river countries in April Objectives is to build capacity and to re-establish data sharing and collaboration on flood forecasting and early warning system on the Sava river. Feasibility Assessment has been completed and discussed in a regional meeting in Zagreb on October 24-25, 2007.

24 24 Disaster Risk Reduction and Response Objectives is to promote and implement investment priorities for strengthening the capacity and promote a coordinated approach to disaster preparedness and response Will be built on existing agreements: Civil-Military Emergency Planning Council and the Disaster Preparedness Initiative of the Stability Pact Vulnerability Assessment is completed More detailed assessment of disaster response is needed.

25 25 Catastrophe Risk Transfer Creation of a regional catastrophe insurance pool that would offer affordably-priced catastrophe insurance coverage to governments of SEE countries. Development of national catastrophe insurance programs for homeowners. Development of standardized tradable weather risk hedging instruments to protect businesses against loss of revenue due to adverse weather conditions. Structuring and issuance of a catastrophe risk bond for countries of the region.

26 26 Disaster Risk Reduction and Response Objectives is to promote and implement investment priorities for strengthening the capacity and promote a coordinated approach to disaster preparedness and response Will be built on existing agreements: Civil-Military Emergency Planning Council and the Disaster Preparedness Initiative of the Stability Pact Vulnerability Assessment is completed More detailed assessment of disaster response is needed.

27 27 Partnership WB-UN/ISDR secretariat in partnership with main UN agencies and actors based on the priority areas: UN Agencies part of the ISDR system: WMO, UNICEF, UNDP etc..UN Agencies part of the ISDR system: WMO, UNICEF, UNDP etc.. Regional Organizations: Council of Europe, the EU, DPPI, OECD etc..Regional Organizations: Council of Europe, the EU, DPPI, OECD etc.. Bi-lateral/Multilateral donors: Denmark, Finland, Switzerland, Italy etc.. (if interest shown by the SEE countries and by donor)Bi-lateral/Multilateral donors: Denmark, Finland, Switzerland, Italy etc.. (if interest shown by the SEE countries and by donor)

28 28 Program Components WB on the DRIVING SEAT The following broad components/activities are eligible for financing under the program: –Disaster Preparedness –Disaster Risk Insurance –Disaster Risk Reduction and Adaptation –Contingency funding Components/activities will be tailored to country-specific needs

29 29 Component I: Disaster Preparedness Eligible activities –Emergency management equipment such as fire trucks, ambulances, search and rescue equipment,..etc – Communications equipment –National Command Center – Forest fire fighting equipment, including planes –Weather forecasting and flood early warning system, etc.

30 30 Component II: Disaster Risk Insurance Eligible activities –Development of disaster insurance schemes that cover: Government budget Business Individual households –Technical Assistance to build government capacity in catastrophe risk analysis and risk transfer

31 31 Component III: Disaster Risk Reduction and Adaptation Eligible activities –Hazards mapping –Flood control – Dam safety – Retrofitting of schools and hospitals –Retrofitting of major infrastructure – Revisions of building codes and land use plans –Etc..

32 32 Component IV: Contingency Funding Eligible activities –Immediate Funds for the use of government in the aftermath of a disaster caused by the impact of natural hazards.

33 33 Phasing Phase I: Will include relatively cheap, but high impact, non- structural components/activities –Disaster Preparedness –Insurance –Non-structural activities under Disaster Risk Reduction and Adaptation – such as revisions in building codes and land use plans and hazards mapping –Development of comprehensive national strategies for disaster risk mitigation and adaptation

34 34 Phasing (Cont.) Phase II: Structural investments –Disaster Risk Reduction and Adaptation – such as flood control, dam safety, retrofitting of buildings, retrofitting of key infrastructure,..etc. Countries may choose to combine phase I and phase II under one operation

35 35 Phasing (cont.) In both phases governments could have access to contingency funding (called DDO) in the aftermath of disasters DDO will provide financing to meet the immediate cash needs of government following a disaster

36 36 Advantages of Phasing Will enable speedy preparation and start implementation of critical activities under phase I Will give governments time to come up with a comprehensive strategy for disaster risk reduction and adaptation to define priorities according to economic, financial, environmental and social criteria

37 37 Next Steps and Timing Bank communicated to all governments on the proposed program Interested governments will decide on the list of components/activities to be included in their project Bank team will work with governments to finalize project documents Financing arrangements will be agreed with governments and other partners.

38 38 Thank you United Nations, secretariat of the International Strategy for Disaster Reduction International Environment House II 7-9 Chemin de Balexert, CH 1219 Chatelaine Geneva 10, Switzerland Tel: /8907 Fax:


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