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Immigration, Geographical Residential Patterns, and the Canadian Assimilation Debate, 1996-2005 Pablo Mendez, Department of Geography, University of British.

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Presentation on theme: "Immigration, Geographical Residential Patterns, and the Canadian Assimilation Debate, 1996-2005 Pablo Mendez, Department of Geography, University of British."— Presentation transcript:

1 Immigration, Geographical Residential Patterns, and the Canadian Assimilation Debate, Pablo Mendez, Department of Geography, University of British Columbia

2 Up and out

3 the underlying assumption of the so-called assimilation thesis

4 Up and out the underlying assumption of the so-called assimilation thesis upon arrival, immigrants move into same-group neighbourhoods with time, they are able to convert their socio- economic achievements into a dispersed residential situation

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6 Voluntary ethno-cultural co-location can be a beneficial practice if it maintains cultural values, it strengthens social networks, and it allows the passing of critical thresholds for the support of institutions and shops. (Peach 1996)

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8 Rejection of the underclass thesis

9 although the convergence of multiple indicators of deprivation affected more newcomers in 2001 than in 1996 (Smith 2004)

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11 The average member of the visible minority group Chinese lives in a Chinesecensus tract … but only about half of the total Chinese population for these three cities lived in such census tracts (Hou 2004)

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13 A bifurcation of the model? a traditional version (continues to apply to most groups) a new version (would apply only to certain groups, in particular the Chinese) ( Haan 2005 )

14 The well-documented residential concentration of Chinese households implies a level of geographical convergence that actually overshadows the high degree of separateness between some Chinese sub- groups, a phenomenon that can only be measured if the Chinese category is disaggregated by country of origin (Lo & Wang, 1997).

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16 Conclusion

17 Census tracts in which at least 30 percent of the population belonged to one of Montreals, Torontos or Vancouvers top three visible minority groups Sources: Hou & Picot 2003, Hou 2004


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