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Setting Standards for the Smart Grid George W. Arnold, Eng.Sc.D. National Coordinator for Smart Grid Interoperability National Institute of Standards and.

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Presentation on theme: "Setting Standards for the Smart Grid George W. Arnold, Eng.Sc.D. National Coordinator for Smart Grid Interoperability National Institute of Standards and."— Presentation transcript:

1 Setting Standards for the Smart Grid George W. Arnold, Eng.Sc.D. National Coordinator for Smart Grid Interoperability National Institute of Standards and Technology July 14, 2009

2 The NIST Role In cooperation with the DoE, NEMA, IEEE, GWAC, and other stakeholders, NIST has primary responsibility to coordinate development of a framework that includes protocols and model standards for information management to achieve interoperability of smart grid devices and systems… Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 Title XIII, Section Smart Grid Interoperability Framework

3 The Need for Standards is Urgent Example: Smart Meters $40 - $50 billion dollar deployment nationwide Underway now ARRA will acclerate Rapid technology evolution Absence of firm standards Source: Congressional Research Service Report 3

4 Comparison of Smart Grid with Next Generation Telecom Network Telecom Next Generation Network Smart Grid Real-world examplesVerizon FiOS, AT&T UverseXcel Boulder, Colorado First trials Standards coordination started # key standards bodies315 Release 1 standards issued Release 2 issued2008Will be issued on rolling basis # standards documents~600 so farWill be hundreds Nature of standardsMostly mix & match of existing standards Mix & match of existing standards and many new 4

5 White House Meeting May 18 Chaired by Secretaries Locke and Chu 66 CEOs and senior executives, federal and state regulators We need to move fast – it can be done! Consensus does not mean unanimity SG investments being made now cannot be ignored Standards need to allow for innovation Open standards are essential Todays regulatory assumptions may have to evolve 5

6 We Need A Standards Roadmap Capabilities Priorities Reference Model Standards Release Plan Responsibilities Governance Testing and Certification 6

7 NIST Three Phase Plan 7 PHASE 1 Identify an initial set of existing consensus standards and develop a roadmap to fill gaps PHASE 1 Identify an initial set of existing consensus standards and develop a roadmap to fill gaps PHASE 2 Establish public/private Standards Panel to provide ongoing recommendations for new/revised standards PHASE 2 Establish public/private Standards Panel to provide ongoing recommendations for new/revised standards PHASE 3 Testing and Certification Framework PHASE 3 Testing and Certification Framework MarchSeptember

8 Roadmap Focus Areas FERC-identified priority applications: –Demand Response –Wide-Area Situational Awareness –Electric Storage –Electric Transportation Additional priority applications: –Advanced Metering Infrastructure –Distribution Grid, including Distributed Energy Resource Integration Cross-cutting priorities –Cybersecurity –Data networking 8

9 9 Demand Response Reference Model

10 10 Customer Facility Automation: BACnet ANSI ASHRAE /ISO ZigBee/HomePlug Smart Energy Profile OpenHAN LON: ANSI/CEA B (2, 3, 4 phy layers), CEA OPC-UA Meter information ANSI C12.19 DR Signaling: OpenADR Demand Response Reference Model

11 Next Step: Plan to Fill Gaps Move OpenADR to a formal standard Pricing information standard Meter standards Storage device interconnection Object models for electric transporation 11

12 A Once In A Lifetime Opportunity! 12


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