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Stephen Van Vleet, Ph.D Washington State University Whitman County Extension Agriculture and Natural Resources Influence of Multi-species Grazing on Continuous.

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Presentation on theme: "Stephen Van Vleet, Ph.D Washington State University Whitman County Extension Agriculture and Natural Resources Influence of Multi-species Grazing on Continuous."— Presentation transcript:

1 Stephen Van Vleet, Ph.D Washington State University Whitman County Extension Agriculture and Natural Resources Influence of Multi-species Grazing on Continuous CRP

2 CRP in Whitman County Acres Accepted 198, Annual Payments$12,389, Total County Cropland 1,020, No general CRP or CSP signup for 2007 or 2008

3 Managed Haying and Grazing Provisions Nesting season April 1 – June 1 **Changed 9/2006: April 1- August 1 Must start with FSA and file a request for grazing 25% payment reduction NRCS grazing plan Incidental grazing – contour buffers and filter strips Changes 9/2005: Only allowed 1 out of every 4 years Grazing period for Whitman County November 1 – February 28 Recent changes 9/2006: Only allowed 1 out of every 10 years

4 Each year approximately 30% of grasses root system is replaced It is necessary for grass to replace its roots to remain healthy and productive It is necessary for grass to replace its above-ground biomass to remain healthy and productive Avoid overgrazing, provide enough rest for grasses to recover Manage grass not livestock Managing Grass

5 Many weeds we face are good sheep and cattle feed –Canada Thistle, Leafy Spurge, Downy Brome, Medusa Head, Rush Skeletonweed, Dalmation Toadflax, Lupine, common Mallow, common Tansy, Whitetop Some weeds are not –Bull Thistle, Nightshade, Poison Hemlock Some weeds do not like to be trampled –Fiddleneck, Rattail fescue Grazing and Weed Control

6 CRP Grazing Study Research site set up on June 20, 2005 Pasture 1=1.12 acres, pasture 2=0.65 acres, pasture 3=1.72 acres, pasture 4(2006)=1.28 acres Primary vegetation: fiddleneck, Canada thistle, downy brome, tumble mustard, cattail, reed canary grass, mullein, catchweed bedstraw, lambsquarter 2005: 6 yearling steers and 6 ewes put in pasture 2 (P2) on June 23 Cattle and sheep removed from trial August : 6 yearling steers and 6 ewes put in pasture 2 on June 12 increased to 8 steers on June 16 Cattle and sheep removed from trial on August 30

7 CRP Grazing Study Permanent sampling areas (rebar rods) were established in each pasture Changes in vegetation were recorded at each sampling point Temperatures were also evaluated (20 foot sections) in cattails and in open areas of a continuous flowing spring

8 June 23 July 5 July 19 Aug. 5 Aug. 19 Aug. 10 Aug. 17 Pasture 2Pasture 1Pasture Rotation Pasture 4

9 June 12 June 19 June 29 July 14 Aug. 25 July 20 July 26 Pasture 2Pasture 1Pasture Rotation July 30 July 31 Aug. 10 Aug. 14 Aug. 20 Aug. 23 Aug. 30 Pasture 4

10 May 24 & 25 May 30 June 12 Pasture 2Pasture 1Pasture Rotation Pasture 4 June 20 July 4 June 30 July 13

11 June 23, 2005 Pasture 2 Pasture 1

12 July 04, 2005 Pasture 2 Pasture 1

13 June 10, 2006 Pasture 2 Pasture

14 June 27, 2006 Pasture 2 Pasture

15 June 30,2005 Plot 8Sept. 22,2005 Plot 8 June 20,2006 Plot 8 Sept. 11,2006 Plot 8

16 May 24, 2007 Plot 8 June1, 2007 Plot 8 100% Grass, Height = 33 cm After 1 st grazing rotation

17 July 19, 2005 Plot 26Sep. 22, 2005 Plot 26 July 14, 2006 Plot 26 Sep.11, 2006 Plot 26

18 May 24, 2007 Plot 26 June 17, 2007 Plot 26 After 1 st grazing rotation 20% Grass, Height = 23 cm

19 PasturesWeedsGrass 147% decrease47% increase 235% decrease35% increase 318% decrease18% increase Change in the percent cover of weeds and grass from 2005 to 2006

20 20 Open Sampling Area 20 Cattail Sampling Area 66°F 64°F Average 2°F decrease after grazing in 2005 and 2006

21 Dayslbs/day steers steers Yearling Steer Weight Gain Data Individual weight gains were taken in 2005 and ranged from 1.35 to Weights in 2006 were taken on all eight steers combined. There was a weak performing steer in 2005 and in 2006 which influenced the weight gain averages. Sheep remained at their maintenance weights because they did not lamb.

22 Grazing CRP AdvantagesDisadvantages Vegetation managementWater availability Weed control Constant animal rotation Limit weed seed production Poor feed quality? Increase grass prod. Decrease H2O temperature Increase OM--carbon storing Wildlife benefit Natural reseeding--hoof action Increase water infiltration

23 Continued Work-Initiatives 1) Separate haying from grazing within the CRP guidelines. 2) Use rotational grazing as a management tool. The typical cost share of $5.00 per acre for maintenance (weed control) and $6.00 per acre for mowing could be used to encourage livestock managers to perform managed grazing on CRP lands (i.e., temporary fencing, water tanks). 3) CRP contract holders: If managed grazing were to be allowed on CRP lands, the livestock producer would enter into an agreement to manage the land and continue to keep the land in grass for the same number of years as the CRP contract, following expiration of the CRP contract. Example: Year Under contract--CRP payments No contract, no payment managed grazing remain in sod and continue mgmt 4) Allow managed grazing on CRP lands 1 out of every 2 years

24 Questions ? (509)


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