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Delivery notes These slides contain all the information you need to deliver this lecture. However, you may remove some of the detail or slides to make.

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Presentation on theme: "Delivery notes These slides contain all the information you need to deliver this lecture. However, you may remove some of the detail or slides to make."— Presentation transcript:

1 Delivery notes These slides contain all the information you need to deliver this lecture. However, you may remove some of the detail or slides to make them appropriate for your trainees, length of lecture and lecture style. You will need to have the following video available to play at points highlighted in the slides: –Training video: deo deo

2 Equal Rights, Equal Respect Citizenship studies Understanding equality

3 Objectives for session one By the end of today, you should: Understand what equality means. Be aware of how our society has become more equal and the unfairness that still exists. Be aware of laws that have been introduced to tackle equality over the years. Understand the Equality Act 2010 and how it works in practice.

4 What is equality?

5 Equality Equality is about ensuring that every individual has an equal opportunity to make the most of their lives, and believing that no one should have poorer life chances because of where, what or whom they were born. Equality recognises that historically, certain groups of people with particular characteristics e.g. race, disability and sexuality, have experienced discrimination.

6 Are we a more equal society today than in the past? Play part 1 of the video to show experts talking about how equality has developed but the issues that still exist: o o

7 Prejudice and stereotypes Much discriminatory behaviour comes from prejudiced attitudes and stereotypes. Prejudice is negatively judging someone without knowing them, on the basis of what they look like or what group they belong to, e.g. all black people are lazy, all young people who wear hoodies are thugs. Stereotyping is thinking all people who belong to a certain group act the same, e.g. all women should be staying at home looking after the children, Asians only eat curry. These negative attitudes influence the way we treat people and behave.

8 Influencing negative attitudes Prejudice, stereotypes and discrimination can all be influenced by different things: –Upbringing/attitudes of family –Personal experiences/negative experiences –Media –Friends –Fear of the unknown/lack of understanding –Intolerance/arrogance –Work –Clubs

9 Power of media The media can encourage negative attitudes towards certain groups. It is important that young people are given a safe forum to explore, challenge and develop their own opinions and those of others. Britons squeezed out of workforce by foreigners Black men 'to blame for most violent city crime Teenage girls are 'out of control'

10 Tackling inequality Over the years, new laws have helped to tackle discrimination and ensure people with particular characteristics are treated fairly. For example, the Sex Discrimination Act was introduced in 1975 to stop discrimination due to a persons gender. Sex discrimination frequently occurred in the past, particularly in the workplace and specifically towards women. The Act restricted advertising for men only jobs. Also the Equal Pay Act 1970, which came into force in 1975, removed unequal treatment on grounds of sex in terms of pay. This is one of many anti-discrimination laws that were introduced to protect people with particular characteristics.

11 Anti-discrimination laws timeline 1918 Representation of the People Act: Gave women of property over the age of 30 the right to vote – not all women could vote. It took until 1928 for women to have the same voting rights as men. Equal Pay Act 1970: Made it unlawful for there to be less favourable treatment between men and women in terms of pay and conditions of employment. Sex Discrimination Act 1975: Protects men and women from discrimination because of sex or marriage in employment, training, education, provision of goods and services, and the disposal of premises.

12 Anti-discrimination laws timeline Race Relations Act 1976: Prevents discrimination because of race in employment, the provision of goods and services, education and public functions. Disability Discrimination Act 1995: Prevents discrimination against people because of disabilities in employment, the provision of goods and services, education and transport. The Employment Equality (Sexual Orientation) Regulations 2003: Made it unlawful to discriminate because of sexual orientation in employment.

13 Anti-discrimination laws timeline The Employment Equality (Religion or Belief) Regulations 2003: Made it unlawful to discriminate because of religion or belief in employment. The Employment Equality (Age) Regulations 2006: Made it unlawful for employers to unreasonably discriminate against employees because of age. The Equality Act (Sexual Orientation) Regulations 2007: Made it unlawful to discriminate because of sexual orientation in the provision of goods, facilities, services, education and public functions.

14 What is the law today? Play part 1 of the video to show experts explaining the Equality Act 2010: o o

15 Equality Act 2010 – key points The Equality Act 2010 makes it unlawful for employers, service providers and education providers to discriminate against, harass or victimise individuals with protected characteristics.

16 Equality Act 2010 – key points Protected characteristics are the grounds upon which discrimination is unlawful and include: –Age –Disability –Gender reassignment –Marriage and civil partnership –Pregnancy and maternity –Race –Religion or belief –Sex –Sexual orientation

17 Equality Act 2010 – key points The Act offers the same levels of protection from discrimination across most protected characteristics and sectors, where appropriate – a process called harmonisation. A few areas do not have equal protection: –In schools, age and marriage and civil partnership do not apply to students, although they do apply to employees. –However, age does apply to students in 6 th form college, FE colleges and universities and to everyone in employment.

18 Equality Act 2010 – key points The Equality Act 2010 also includes the Public Sector Equality Duty (PSED). This means public bodies not only have to eliminate discrimination, but also have to have due regard to the need to advance equality of opportunity and foster good relations.

19 Equality Act 2010 – key points The Equality Act 2010 also includes provisions for Positive Action. This enables schools to overcome or minimise disadvantages experienced by people who share a protected characteristic to meet their different needs or reduce under representation. For example: –Providing additional classes for Gypsies and Travellers that are underperforming.

20 Real-life examples of discrimination Case: A Muslim girl, called Bushra Noah, was rejected from 25 hairdressing jobs. One particular hairdresser stated that it was because she wears a head scarf. The owner claimed her staff needed to display their hairstyles to customers. Do you think this could be unlawful discrimination?

21 Real-life examples of discrimination Outcome: This was unlawful discrimination because of religion and belief. The court ruled that Bushra had been badly upset by her job interview and was awarded £4000 compensation for injury to feelings.

22 Real-life examples of discrimination Case: Martyn Hall and Steven Preddy are civil partners who booked to stay in a hotel but when they arrived, the Christian hotel owners, Mr and Mrs Bull, refused to allow the gay couple to stay in a room with a double bed which were set aside for married people. They were offered a room with two single beds instead. Do you think this could be unlawful discrimination?

23 Real-life examples of discrimination Outcome: This was unlawful discrimination because of sexual orientation. The court ruled that the hotel had directly discriminated against the couple and awarded them £1,800 compensation.

24 Real-life examples of discrimination Case: Miriam OReilly was dropped from the BBC1s rural affairs show, Countryfile, when it moved to its peak-time slot in April OReilly took her case to court, claiming discrimination after she was one of four female presenters, all in their 40s and 50s, who were dropped from the show. Do you think this could be unlawful discrimination?

25 Real-life examples of discrimination Outcome: This was unlawful discrimination because of age. The court ruled that age was a significant factor in dropping OReilly and the BBC was asked to provide compensation. Do you think this could be unlawful discrimination?

26 To think about...

27 To think about What are the opportunities for teachers? What are the challenges for teachers? What methods could you use to teach equality?

28 Useful information

29 Useful reading Equal Rights, Equal Respect on the Equality and Human Rights Commission website provide lots more information, including free online training and resources:


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