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CLRProfiler A Tool to Analyze the Heap Usage of Managed Code Peter Sollich Microsoft Corporation.

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Presentation on theme: "CLRProfiler A Tool to Analyze the Heap Usage of Managed Code Peter Sollich Microsoft Corporation."— Presentation transcript:

1 CLRProfiler A Tool to Analyze the Heap Usage of Managed Code Peter Sollich Microsoft Corporation

2 Agenda Overview Important Views –Allocation Graph –Objects by Address –Time Line –Heap Graph How they are implemented -Instrumentation -Allocation notifications, Shadow Stack for Allocation Graph -Heap simulation, LiveObjectTable for Objects by Address -SampleObjectTable for Time Line -Building the Heap Graph -The CLRProfiler API

3 Overview Focused on managed heap –Who allocates what –What objects survive –What is on the heap –Who is holding on to objects Instrumented application writes log Separate tool to analyze log offline Intrusive tool –By default, every allocation, every call is logged –Expect 10 – 100 x slowdown –Logging can be turned off selectively for speedup –Not a tool to measure where time is spent

4 Agenda Overview Important Views –Allocation Graph –Objects by Address –Time Line –Heap Graph How they are implemented -Instrumentation -Allocation notifications, Shadow Stack for Allocation Graph -Heap simulation in LiveObjectTable for Objects by Address -SampleObjectTable for Time Line -Building the Heap Graph -The CLRProfiler API

5 Allocation Graph What is it? Every type, every method becomes a vertex Edges from method to type if method allocates type Edges from method A to method B if A calls B and B (directly or indirectly) allocates Sizes of vertices, width of edges proportional to cumulative total of allocation Detail is suppressed below an adjustable threshold Recursion is eliminated to some extent What is it useful for? Which call stacks allocate which types?

6 Allocation Graph (continued) Show demo of simple parser example –What would we do in this case? Avoid string.Split, use lower level calls. –We could also change string.Split to allocate a smaller int[] array and grow if necessary. –What does CLRProfiler itself do for parsing? Show Source code for ReadChar(). Another example: drawing gc tick marks –Original version – new SolidBrush(), new Pen() inside loop –Improved version preallocates a table of these Real life example – a GUI library was allocating lots of objects while just hovering the mouse over form – we were able to pinpoint allocating methods

7 Objects by Address What is it? Picture of gc heap at particular point in time Addresses are mapped to pixels – selectable resolution Pixel color determined by objects type What is it useful for? Determine what gets promoted to higher generations Get intuition for what is taking space on the heap Get intuition for application phases Can drill down by selecting address range and asking for allocation graph, histograms

8 Objects by Address (continued) Demo application with finalizers –Fix the problem – using statement –Not so contrived as it seems – this happened in CLRProfiler with pens and brushes! Real life example –Database application had bad performance, stressing gc –Tracked this down to useless finalizer –Still happens to a surprising extent in Longhorn – unfortunately not so easy to fix there...

9 Time Line What is it? Picture of evolution of gc heap over time Horizontal axis is time axis Vertical axis is addresses Pixel color determined by type of object at address at point in time What is it useful for? See at a glance whether heap is growing, how effective garbage collection is See how often gen 0, gen 1, gen 2 collections occur Can drill down by selecting time interval or point in time and requesting Allocation Graph, Histograms etc.

10 Time Line (continued) Demo view using previous example Real life example –Application using asynchronous I/O (network) had high working set –Tracked down to garbage collector unable to recycle memory due to fragmentation caused by pinning –In CLRProfiler, noticed discrepancy between what the time line showed (a large heap), and what Heap Graph said (not many objects actually live) –Changed garbage collector to deal better with fragmentation caused by pinning, also need to change application or library to use less pinning.

11 Heap Graph What is it? Shows objects on the heap and their connections For each object, only shows (a) shortest path from a garbage collector root Objects are grouped by signatures (type of parent, type of object, type of objects referenced). History feature – you can see what is growing You can see new objects added since the last heap dump What is it useful for? Used mostly to investigate leaks – what is holding all these objects alive?

12 Real life example: Longhorn Explorer Opening and closing the clock on the side bar –Time Line shows the heap is growing – a leak? –Objects by Address shows phases of the application –Heap Graph shows growth – we are indeed leaking Explorer idle –Time Line shows garbage collector tuning problem – need to do generation 1 garbage collection earlier –Objects by Address shows various...Transform objects piling up in generation 1 –Can drill down and find out call stacks responsible for these allocations. Need to investigate whether callers can call Dispose when done using the...Transform objects.

13 Agenda Overview Important Views –Allocation Graph –Objects by Address –Time Line –Heap Graph How they are implemented -Instrumentation -Allocation notifications, Shadow Stack for Allocation Graph -Heap simulation, LiveObjectTable for Objects by Address -SampleObjectTable for Time Line -Building the Heap Graph -The CLRProfiler API

14 Instrumentation CLR provides profiling callbacks – no need to change CLR or application to profile Set environment variables (or registry keys) to indicate profiling and which profiler dll to load set COR_ENABLE_PROFILING=0x1 set COR_PROFILER={8C29BC4E-1F57-461a-9B C32E6F1F} Profiler dll implements interface which CLR calls to notify profiler of important events Profiler dll associated with CLRProfiler responds to notifications by logging or updating its datastructures

15 Logging Allocations CLR calls ObjectAllocated notification, passing address and type of object allocated CLR calls FunctionEnter/FunctionExit notifications – profiler dll uses these (and others for tail calls, exceptions etc.) to maintain shadow stack Profiler dll responds to ObjectAllocated notification by logging allocation and current shadow stack Current format encodes object size, object type and call stack in a single integer. But ID of allocating thread and object address are also logged – still room for improvement!

16 Logging Allocations – Evolution of format Initial format – log all the names explicitly, e.g.: System.String 24 System.String.Concat System.String(System.String System.String) MyNameSpace.MyClass.MyFunction void ()... Next step: list type, method names just once, they occur many times (but added object address): t 33 System.String f 163 System.String.Concat System.String(System.String System.String) f 623 MyNameSpace.MyClass.MyFunction()... a 0x

17 Evolution of log file format (continued) Now we compress object type, size and stacktrace into a single integer – they are often repeated as well: t 33 System.String f 163 System.String.Concat System.String(System.String System.String) f 623 MyNameSpace.MyClass.MyFunction() s a 0x On the other hand, we needed to add the id of the allocating thread: ! 968 0x Still room for improvement – thread ids can be smaller, addresses, stacktrace ids are often consecutive or close

18 Building the Allocation Graph For Allocation Graph, parser just increments a counter in table indexed by the id that encodes object size, type and call stack When done parsing, examine each non-zero entry Retrieve call stack, make each entry into a vertex Retrieve object type, make into a vertex Generate appropriate edges Weight of vertices and edges determined from count and object size Lay out and display resulting graph – hard to do well, still in flux

19 Building Object by Address Uses allocation log entries Also uses relocation log entries generated when garbage collector moves entries – log file format is simple: u u 0x01cc4a58 0x01cc469c 296 Object death notification would be handy, but we dont have it (yet) – using heuristics to infer object death – not completely accurate! How to build the simulation – LiveObjectTable –Needs to be fast and relatively compact –Started with sorted list, was too slow and bulky –Currently use (segmented) array indexed by objects address, a ½ size map of the real garbage collector heap –Stored information: 1 bit for start of object, 22 bits to encode type, size, stacktrace, 23 bits for allocation time – minimum object size is 12 bytes in the real heap, 6 bytes in the map. Stored as 3 16-bit words, high bit marks obj start

20 LiveObjectTable Real object layout: Simulated layout (1/2 Size) Object Header (4 Bytes) Method Table (4 Bytes) Contents (>= 4 Bytes)... 1 TSS Lo (15 bits) 0 TSS Hi (7 bits) AT Lo (8 bits) AT Hi (15 bits) TSS = type, size, stacktrace AT = allocation time High bit marks start of object Next Object Header (4 Bytes)...1 Next TSS Lo... (15 bits)

21 Building Time Line Cannot show or track history of all objects Hence, track history of changes at sample addresses (1024 byte granularity today) When an object gets allocated at or moved from or to a sample address, make a note of the change Data structure used is an array of lists of changes: SampleObjectTable Additional lists for garbage collection markers, user entries in the log file Final graph drawn by walking lists of changes, drawing colored lines from change to change

22 SampleObjectTable 0x Secs String Secs Int Secs Free Space 0x x x12340C Secs Object [] Secs String Secs Double Garbage Collections Secs Gen 1 Coll Secs Gen 0 Coll Secs Gen 0 Coll.

23 Building Heap Graph Profiler dll uses ObjectReferences and RootReferences notifications to log appropriate information - log file format is very simple: –o { } –o 0x01c x01c912b0 0x01c912fc 0x01c91320 –r { } –r 0x020455d0 0x02044d98 0x x Parser of analysis tool builds full graph of objects Analysis tool determines (a) shortest path from the root for each object in a breadth-first traversal For each object, signature is computed from type of parent, type of object, and type of objects referenced For each object on the path from the root, we create a vertex based on the signature, and appropriate edges between the vertices Finally, lay out and display resulting graph

24 Building Heap Graph (continued) Objects in Heap Graph contain allocation time (determined by looking them up in LiveObjectTable) –We can restrict the graph to a range of allocation times –Useful to determine recent heap growth –Useful to determine old objects surviving for too long Objects in Heap Graph also have allocation stack (also determined by looking them up in LiveObjectTable) –So we can tell you who allocated them

25 Agenda Overview Important Views –Allocation Graph –Objects by Address –Time Line –Heap Graph How they are implemented -Instrumentation -Allocation notifications, Shadow Stack for Allocation Graph -Heap simulation, LiveObjectTable for Objects by Address -SampleObjectTable for Time Line -Building the Heap Graph -The CLRProfiler API

26 CLRProfiler API Allows application to control profiling: –Turn profiling on or off –Log comments (can also serve as time markers) –Trigger heap dumps –Enables more fancy investigations Compare heap dumps at specific points in application Determine which objects allocated between entering and exiting a method still survive later Etc. Implemented by a thin layer of managed code calling into profiling dll via P/Invoke.

27 CLRProfiler API (continued) public class CLRProfilerControl { // log comments public static void LogWriteLine(string comment) {... } public static void LogWriteLine(string format, params object[] args) {... } // enable/disable profiling public static bool AllocationLoggingActive { get {... } set {... } } public static bool CallLoggingActive { get {... } set {... } } // dump heap public static void DumpHeap() {... } // is process being profiled? public static bool ProcessIsUnderProfiler { get {... } } }

28 Finally... Source code, binaries, and documentation for CLRProfiler are freely available: –http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyId=86CE6052 -D7F4-4AEB-9B7A-94635BEEBDDA&displaylang=enhttp://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyId=86CE6052 -D7F4-4AEB-9B7A-94635BEEBDDA&displaylang=en –http://www.gotdotnet.com/team/clr/about_clr_performance.aspx also has a link that will probably be more permanent...http://www.gotdotnet.com/team/clr/about_clr_performance.aspx If you get the impression that you could write a profiler, too, you are probably right – its not that hard, and there are plenty of interesting notifications from the CLR to play with... More examples and Documentation provided with VS Questions?


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