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Developing the Future: Student Affairs and Technology Iowa State University MacGarret Becker Verl Long Frank Rowen Chris Stoppel Student Affairs.com Virtual.

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Presentation on theme: "Developing the Future: Student Affairs and Technology Iowa State University MacGarret Becker Verl Long Frank Rowen Chris Stoppel Student Affairs.com Virtual."— Presentation transcript:

1 Developing the Future: Student Affairs and Technology Iowa State University MacGarret Becker Verl Long Frank Rowen Chris Stoppel Student Affairs.com Virtual Case Study Competition

2 Higher Education 601: Student Affairs and Technology Presented by Iowa State University Presentation Content: 1. Purpose of this Course 2. Intended Outcomes of the Course 3. Syllabus 4. Individual Class Descriptions 5. Assignment Learner Outcomes 6. Justification 7. Sources

3 Higher Education 601: Student Affairs and Technology Presented by Iowa State University Purpose of this Course The purpose of Higher Education 601: Student Affairs and Technology is to prepare current and future professionals with the necessary knowledge, understandings, and skills to assess technology in student affairs. Topics will include key concepts and terms; data security; network systems; internet issues; legal issues; technology and student development; e-professionalism; and future technology issues. Intended Outcomes of the Course Students will: 1. Identify key technology issues in student affairs. 2. Analyze technology and identify relevant issues to consider. 3. Identify characteristics of a properly technology-equipped campus. 4. Analyze the costs that can be incurred with a high-technology campus. 5.Develop a forward thinking thought process to technology on campus.

4 StudentAffairs.Com Virtual Case Study Competition Higher Education 601 – Student Affairs and Technology (3 credits) Fall Semester 2004 Mondays, 6:00-9:00 PM Course Prerequisites: Successful completion of two student development theory courses or equivalent. Course Description: The purpose this course is to prepare current and future professionals with the necessary knowledge, understandings, and skills to assess technology in student affairs. Topics will include key concepts and terms; data security; network systems; internet issues; legal issues; technology and student development; e-professionalism; and future technology issues. Course Objectives: Students will: 1.Identify key technology issues in student affairs. 2.Analyze technology and identify relevant issues to consider. 3.Identify characteristics of a properly technology-equipped campus. 4.Analyze the costs that can be incurred with a high-technology campus. 5.Develop a forward thinking thought process to technology on campus. Required Texts: Frye, C. (2003). Microsoft Office 2003 Step by Step. Redmond, WA: Microsoft Press. Hamrick, F.A., Evans, N.J., & Schuh, J.H. (2002). Foundations of Student Affairs Practice: How Philosophy, Theory, and Research Strengthen Educational Outcomes. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Petridves, L.A. (ed.). (2000). Case Studies on Information Technology in Higher Education: Implications for Policy and Practice. Hershey, PA: Idea Group Publishing Recommended Texts: Baier, J.L. & Strong, T.S. (eds.). (1993). Technology and Student Affairs. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Hawke, C.S. (2000). Computer and Internet Use on Campus: A Legal Guide to Issues of Intellectual Property, Free Speech, and Privacy. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Schwitzer, A.M., Ancis, J.R., & Brown, N.W. (2000). Promoting Student Learning and Student Development at a Distance: Student Affairs Concepts and Practices for Televised Instruction and Other Forms of Distance Learning. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield. Course Syllabus Presented by Iowa State University Higher Education 601: Student Affairs and Technology

5 Expectations: In addition to completing all required readings prior to class meetings and participating in class discussions and activities, students are expected to fulfill the following: Students must have an active university account for communication purposes. The university has several computer and technology labs equipped with word processing programs, Internet access, and other software. Students must be familiar with the university library and how to locate resources via the librarys computerized databases. Students should also have a working understanding of conducting research for higher education and student affairs via online databases. Assignments and Evaluation: 1.One five-minute oral presentation defining and detailing one concept of technology. 2.One 5-7 page reflection paper integrating personal accounts, issues, and vision for successful integration of technology into students lives. 3.Three 1-2 page article reviews demonstrating understanding and applications of current issues in technology and student affairs. 4.One case study analysis with oral and visual presentation presented by student pairings. 5.One 45-minute presentation demonstrating understanding and integration of course topics applied to one functional area within student affairs presented by three-person student groups. In-depth explanations of assignments are detailed in later sections of the syllabus. 5 Minute Definition Presentation5 Reflection Paper on Student Affairs and Technology20 Article Review 5 points each)15 Case Study15 Collaborative Creative Component35 Class participation and engagement All assignments are due on the date and time as indicated in the syllabus. Late assignments are unacceptable and will be penalized one-half the assignment value. Students with extraordinary circumstances, work/assistantship conflicts, or personal emergencies must discuss alternate deadlines and demonstrate appropriate completion of assignments prior to deadlines with the instructor. Unexcused absences will detract from participation points awarded. Grading Scale - No incompletes will be given for this class. A points A grades reflect exemplary performance in all areas A points B points B grades reflect consistent proficiency and high quality work B83-86 points B points C points C grades reflect marginal performance at the graduate level C73-78 points Failing 72 points C-, D, and F grades are unacceptable at the graduate level Presented by Iowa State University Course Syllabus continued Higher Education 601: Student Affairs and Technology

6 Presented by Iowa State University Course Schedule: Course Syllabus continued

7 Higher Education 601: Student Affairs and Technology Presented by Iowa State University Course Assignments: 5 Minute Definition Presentation – Each student will select and research one concept or product essential to todays technology and present to the class brief, detailed definitions and applications for student affairs educators. Each presentation is to last no more than five minutes and a one-page handout to classmates and instructor is encouraged. The purpose of this assignment is not to invest great amounts of time into the presentation, but rather to understand better technology and relate it to the university environment. Each student will indicate their preferred date and topic to the instructor. Reflection Paper on Student Affairs and Technology – The student will reflect upon the broad issues and impacts of technology in student affairs and how this concept relates to the students academic progress, current worksite, and personal experiences. Students are encouraged to trace the recent evolution of technology and detail its ever-widening impact on students, faculty, and professionals in higher education. Similarly, trace the impacts technology has had on you, the student, and highlight successes, problems, concerns, and anticipated areas for improvement/advancement. Synthesize the two strains of thought together, both reflecting and hypothesizing the future of technology in student affairs. Papers should be 5-7 pages in length. Article Review – Each student will select, read, and analyze three different current articles and describe the relationship between student affairs and technology. All subject areas discussed in the syllabus, in addition to concepts that arise via class discussion or workplace experience, are optimal areas for article review. Briefly describe salient points of the article, depth and breadth of perceived/anticipated/current impact to student affairs and technology, and personal vantages about the issue. Papers should be 1-2 pages in length (no cover page). Case Study – Students will work in C 3 groups to discuss a case study detailing a students possible involvement in illegally obtaining and sharing music files while living on campus. Students are expected to prepare a 20 minute presentation for the class detailing pertinent facts, relevant theories, current university/state/national trends, and possible solutions. The assignment will be given to groups in class during Legal Issues and Technology I and presentations will occur the following week, during Legal Issues and Technology II. Use of visual aides is encouraged. An electronic copy or compact disc is the preferred method of submission to the instructor. Collaborative Creative Component (C 3 ) -- Each student group will assess the technology in a student affairs office on campus. Using the knowledge gained through the semester, students will review the current equipment, uses of technology, and the technology expertise of the office personnel. Students will assess if the offices technology is sufficient for the work done in that office and if it is allowing staff to address student needs. Students will research technology trends for that field of student affairs and what technology requirements will be necessary for that office in the future. Each group will have a 45 minute multimedia presentation base on their finding and recommendations for their office. The group is required to turn in an electronic file of their presentation via or compact disc. Information for Students: Academic Dishonesty Academic dishonesty, including intentional or unintentional plagiarism, is of central importance in a course and discipline where actual, factual published ideas and research exists. All graduate students are responsible for understanding and abiding by the universitys policies regarding academic integrity and student conduct. Academic dishonest –in all its formsaffects all students, staff, and faculty and is strictly prohibited. Consult the universitys general catalog, graduate college catalog, graduate college handbook, and student code of conduct for clarification of definitions and policies. Contributing to the Academic Environment Involvement in class discussion occurs in many forms, including (but not limited to): posing questions, providing answers or relevant information; demonstrating listening and verbal skills; contributing to small group work and activities; and participating in online discussions via messaging and formats. It is important to present good examples based on concepts at hand, build on the comments of students, provide insight and clarification about topics, and being sensitive to your level of participation and increasing or decreasing activity as necessary. Furthermore, students are to attend all class meetings, turn off all pagers and cell phones (except for emergency contact), and be on time to class. Course Syllabus continued

8 Higher Education 601: Student Affairs and Technology Presented by Iowa State University Documented Disabilities Students with a documented disability that affect their ability to participate fully in the course or who require special accommodations are encouraged to speak with the instructor so that appropriate accommodations can be arranged. Grading Assignments will be graded on content as well as technical quality of writing and presentation. All written materials should be proofread for errors prior to submission. Consult the Department of Higher Educations Rubrics of Oral Presentations and Written Materials for defining standards. Selected Readings: AScribe Law News Service. (2003, August 29). Internet Ethics: College Students Say Downloading Copyrighted Material Is Not Unethical. Page not available. Beachy, R.N. (2003). Intellectual Property policies and serving the public. Science, 299(5606), 473. Bloombecker, J.J. (2001). Computer ethics: an antidote to despair. Mid-Atlantic Journal of Business 27(1), Community College Week. (2003, May 12). 220 students lose dorm access for file sharing. 15(20), 20. Foster, A.L. (2003). California colleges prepare to disclose computer intrusions; some officials fear new law is unclear and might not work. The Chronicle of Higher Education 49(39), A Kuh, G.H., & Hu, S. (2001). The Relationships Between Computer and Information Technology Use, Selected Learning and Personal Development Outcomes, and Other College Experiences. The Journal of College Student Development, 42(3), Lewis, J., Coursol, D. & Khan, L. (2001) College A Study of Comfort and the Use of Technology. The Journal of College Student Development,42(6), O'Neil, R. (2003). What limits should campus networks place on pornography?. The Chronicle of Higher Education, 49(28), B20. Pedrotty Bryant, D., & Bryantt, B.R. (2002). Assistive Technology for People with Disabilities. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Allyn & Bacon. Rothfeder, S. (1989). Is Nothing Private?. Business Week, 3122, Scanlon, P.M., Neumann, D.R. (2002). Internet Plagiarism Among College Students. Journal of College Student Development, 43(3), Schererp, K. (1997). College life on-line: Healthy and unhealthy internet use, Journal of College Student Development,38, The Chronicle Review: Information Technology. (2004, January 30). The Chronicle of Higher Education, pp. B1-B30. The syllabus is subject to change at the discretion of the instructor. Advanced notification will be provided concerning any modifications. Course Syllabus continued

9 Description: This class is designed to review with students the class syllabus. A brief introductory discussion will take place regarding issues of technology within student affairs. Class ends with introducing desktop applications that deal with word processing, overhead presentations, and . Learner Outcomes: Students will have an understanding of class expectations. Students will have better understanding from classroom discussion the potential uses and disadvantages of technology with student affairs. Students will be introduced to desktop applications that deal with word processing, overhead presentations, and . A visual demonstration will be given to show common and uncommon uses from these applications which will enhance students understanding of how the applications can be used. Tuesday, August 30 Week 1 Course Overview, Discussion of Student Affairs and Technology. Introduction to word processing, overhead presentation, and applications. Higher Education 601: Student Affairs and Technology Presented by Iowa State University

10 Tuesday, Sept. 7 Week 2 Software continued – Media publishing, spreadsheets, and database applications. Higher Education 601: Student Affairs and Technology Presented by Iowa State University Description: Media Publishing applications will be reviewed that are used for publication of documents for flyers, pamphlets, newsletters, etc. The remaining class time will be dedicated to reviewing with students software that is used for accounting purposes and creating databases. Importance of databases will be discussed. Common and Uncommon uses will be explained and demonstrated for each application as well as the differences between spreadsheet and database applications. Budgetary uses will also be discussed and demonstrated using spreadsheets. Learner Outcomes: To be introduced to the tools and varying uses of a media publishing application. To gain a better understanding of how spreadsheets and database applications are used differently and how they can be used to create, maintain, and store student records. To learn how spreadsheet applications can be utilized for budgetary uses.

11 Description: The class will discuss and give descriptions for potential security threats for stored data, such as viruses, worms, Trojan horses, and spyware. Options for securing data and backing up data will be discussed. Class will conclude with an introduction to web design. Students will be introduced to good web design technique and website uses. Web design software (i.e., Netscape Composer) will be used to show a WYSIWYG (What You See Is What You Get) approach to web page development as well as an introduction to basic HTML. Learner Outcomes: Students will gain an understanding of data security and protection. Learn web site development as well as issues with web site creation, such as what software tools to use, accessibility for the disabled, and good web design technique. Tuesday, Sept. 14 Week 3 Software Continued (Web design applications). Introduction to data security. Article Review #1 Higher Education 601: Student Affairs and Technology Presented by Iowa State University

12 Description: Class will begin with discussing varying uses of technology within different divisions of student affairs, such as with Admissions, Department of Residence, Financial Aid, Registrars, and etc. Students will be introduced to basic networking structure through a guest speaker who is familiar with the systems being used on a campus. Learner Outcomes: Students will learn about different technology uses within various divisions of student affairs. Students will gain a general understanding of networking systems within a campus environment. Tuesday, Sept. 21 Week 4 A more in-depth look at uses of technology within the various areas of student affairs. Introduction to Campus Systems. Reflection Paper Higher Education 601: Student Affairs and Technology Presented by Iowa State University

13 Description: Internet issues on campus will look into topics about website space needed to maintain student and student organization websites, the possible issues with hosting such sites, and how to establish proper guidelines for student web development. University homepages will be researched to determine how all types of groups (prospective students, current students, staff/faculty, and others) utilize these sites and what the ideal university website should be. Other student Internet uses including online scholarships, FAFSA issues, academic sites, and plagiarism issues will be discussed. Learner Outcomes: Students will be able to provide guidance to students or organizations on acceptable Internet content. Have an understanding of how people use the Internet in relation to universities. Students should become familiar with the resources that are available on the Internet. Tuesday, Sept. 28 Week 5 The Internet on Campus Higher Education 601: Student Affairs and Technology Presented by Iowa State University

14 Tuesday, October 5 Week 6 Legal Issues and Technology IArticle Review #2 Higher Education 601: Student Affairs and Technology Presented by Iowa State University Description: Issues such as: peer-to-peer networks and how they can be used properly and improperly; FERPA and how it applies to electronic forms of communication; issues of plagiarism and how they are affected by technology; laws surrounding confidentiality of personal information that is stored digitally by the university; and existing laws on intellectual property, downloading of music and movies, etc., will be discussed. Learner Outcomes: Students will learn about the ethics and laws concerning technology. Student will learn about the misuse of peer to peer networks. This will include the legal aspects of this issue and how this may affect their student populations. Students will learn how FERPA applies even to electronic communication so they can still adhere to ethical standards and principals. Students will learn about other laws surrounding protection of personal information stored digitally. Students will learn about the ethics and laws associated with downloading movies and music so they can communicate these ideas to their students. Students will learn about the risks of plagiarism, especially in the digital age, for their own benefit and that of their students.

15 Tuesday, October 12 Week 7 Legal Issues and Technology II Higher Education 601: Student Affairs and Technology Presented by Iowa State University Description: Presentation of case study about a student who has been charged with illegally obtaining music files. Panel discussion about legal issues in technology including an attorney and a campus Information Technology officer. Learner Outcomes: Students will learn to think of the big picture, outside of their own normal roles. Students will learn different ways to approach the same situation through hearing others ideas. Students will get to interact with and learn how experienced professionals in the field would react to situations.

16 Description: The trends in technology on campuses will look into possible system requirements (bandwidth, P2P, monitoring usage) for universities in the future. Issues dealing with the cost of new systems, requirements for future students such as laptops for every student, and funding will be discussed. How to address these issues and what skills will be need to handle new technology will be brought up. Learner Outcomes: Students will understand the newest technology trends in student affairs. Students will gain an understanding of the costs and resource issues that will arise from funding new technology. Tuesday, October 19 Week 8 Future Issues with Technology and Student Affairs, Collaborative Creative Component discussed Higher Education 601: Student Affairs and Technology Presented by Iowa State University

17 Description: Review seminal person-environment, psychosocial, and typology theories. Discuss in particular typology theories and how certain students may not function best in an environment such as the university because of its reliance on ever-changing technology. Brainstorm ideas about changes in student interaction and communication between students and faculty. Discuss changing nature of campus interactions and services provided online to studentsare increases in technological reliance damaging student development and interaction? What methods exist to increase student-student or student-faculty contact or improve possible strains of relationships between parties, especially with regard to varying diversities? Learner Outcomes: Students will revisit and solidify understandings of important student development theories. Students will understand technology concepts present that improve and discourage student development. Students will better comprehend changing student-student and student- faculty relationships with regard to technology. Tuesday, October 26 Week 9 Technology and Student Development IArticle Review #3 Higher Education 601: Student Affairs and Technology Presented by Iowa State University

18 Description: Discuss student groups that may be marginalized through increased use of technology via access and cultural norms of communication, including differences among those of various social-economic, physical and mental abilities, racial, ethnic, gender, and sexual orientation backgrounds. Focus specifically on serving two distinct student populations: non-traditional adult students and students with disabilities. What purposes and needs do non-traditional students have, and does current technology standards permit full-usability for this population? What can be employed to meet and exceed current standards for using technology for persons with disabilities? Learner Outcomes: Increase knowledge of impacts of technology on students representing multiple diversities. Explore, in-depth, development and access issues related to non- traditional adult students and students with disabilities. Tuesday, Nov. 2 Week 10 Technology and Student Development II Higher Education 601: Student Affairs and Technology Presented by Iowa State University

19 Description: Investigate trends and growth of offering university services online, especially with distance education. Learn what distance education represents and ways educators must improve services to assist those not necessarily on campus. What purposes do the universitys World Wide Web pages serve? How has incoming and transfer students expectations and needs changed for selecting colleges and universities via accessing materials on the Internet? Discuss actual and future uses of the universitys webpages for current students, staff, and faculty. Review how courses best make usage of technology, including WebCT applications and use of . Review current data outlining students choice in majors and improvements of completing surveys, both internal to the university and external for research purposes, and how changes, if any, have occurred. Learner Outcomes: Students will gain a working knowledge of distance education and its increasing appeal to students. Students will comprehend importance of websites and their importance in recruiting and retaining prospective and current students. Students will become familiar with current trends detailing relationship and impacts of technology on students. Tuesday, Nov. 9 Week 11 Technology and Student Development III* 5 Minute Presentations completed Higher Education 601: Student Affairs and Technology Presented by Iowa State University

20 Description: A class trip will be taken to an institution of higher education that is not similar (e.g. community college; small, private, liberal arts; vocational school) to view and assess the institutions use of technology. Students will meet with the institutions head of IT, dean of students, and a faculty representative to understand how technology impacts campus life. Learner Outcomes: Students will become aware of technology differences at other types of institutions. Provide students the opportunity to network at another institution. Tuesday, Nov. 16 Week 12 Field Trip – Alternative Institution Higher Education 601: Student Affairs and Technology Presented by Iowa State University

21 Description: Proper techniques will be addressed because of its impression on those who receive it. Included in this will be addressing s with a proper subject line, personalizing the message, accounting for tone, forwarding, discussing who could see the , unnecessary ing, how to respond to , and other etiquette. The importance of organization in a departmental and personal drive will be discussed. Learner Outcomes: Students will discuss and become better generators and receptors of electronic communication. The student will understand the importance of organization and effective organization of a computer drive. Collaborative Creative Component Presentations Tuesday, Nov. 30 Week 13 Technology and E-Professionalism for the Student Affairs Professional I (1/2 class) Collaborative Creative Component Presentations Groups 1 & 2 Higher Education 601: Student Affairs and Technology Presented by Iowa State University

22 Description: The second half of this course subject will focus on resource available for student affairs professionals. A review of job search websites, how to best use these sites to ease the job search process, and how to submit resumes to various sites will be discussed. Other resources for professionals will be reviewed including specialized areas websites, using the Internet to book conference travel and participation, and become familiar with other student affairs sites. Learner Outcomes: Students will gain an understanding of the information available on the internet for professional advancement and development. Develop insight into applying for professional positions and utilizing time and efforts effectively in conducting Internet job searches. Collaborative Creative Component Presentations Tuesday, Dec. 7 Week 14 Technology and E-Professionalism for the Student Affairs Professional II (1/2 class) Collaborative Creative Component Presentations Groups 3 & 4 Higher Education 601: Student Affairs and Technology Presented by Iowa State University

23 Higher Education 601: Student Affairs and Technology Presented by Iowa State University Assignment Learner Outcomes Five Minute Definition Presentation Increase comfort of speaking in small group settings, similar to functional area meetings. Improve extemporaneous oral communication skills. Familiarize oneself with technological concepts and relate them to classmates clearly. Connect with online and printed materials to assist in creating definitions. Reflection Paper on Student Affairs and Technology Demonstrate self-understanding of impacts in technology relating to student life. Strengthen editing, proofreading, and written communication skills. Article Reviews Enhance awareness of issues occurring in technology affecting student affairs. Strengthen editing, proofreading, and written communication skills Case Study Help students develop analytical and problem-solving skills. Familiarize students with real situations that have occurred on other campuses. Collaborative Creative Component Allow students to focus on a department in student affairs and assess the current technology. Understand the possible future technology needs of selected department. Student will be able to apply the theoretical and technical knowledge gain through the semester.

24 Higher Education 601: Student Affairs and Technology Presented by Iowa State University Justification We believe technology will play an increasing role within the campus environment and the higher education experience. This impact will affect the relationships, functions, and identities of students, staff, and faculty. The rate at which technology advances requires a depth of understanding of uses and issues. Likewise, this knowledge will assist in the quality and quantity of services available to students at a given institution. We recognize and celebrate the many forms of diversity present in higher education and seek to best serve students needs through careful integration of technology. Additionally, student affairs professionals have a responsibility to be familiar with the legal and ethical implications of technology within their respective offices and its impact upon students. Technology will also shape the psychosocial, identity, cognitive, and moral development of current and future students. An understanding of development is central to providing superior service for students. As technology changes, innovative theories and applications will be needed to meet the needs of students. For these reasons, a course on Student Affairs and Technology is a vital component in the preparation of student affairs educators.

25 Higher Education 601: Student Affairs and Technology Presented by Iowa State University Sources EDUCAUSE. Retrieved February 15, 2004 from Evans, N.J., Forney, D.S., & Gudio-DiBrito, F. (1998). Student development in college: Theory, research, and practice. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Iowa State University – Administrative Technology Services. Retrieved February 15, 2004 from Itsecurity.com Security Tutorial. Retrieved February 15, 2004 from Kuh, G.H., & Hu, S. (2001). The relationships between computer and information technology use, selected learning and personal development outcomes, and other college experiences. The Journal of College Student Development, 42(3), Skalar, J., (2000). Principles of web design. Boston: Course Technology-Thomson Learning. The Chronicle Review: Information Technology. (2004, January 30). The Chronicle of Higher Education, pp. B1-B30. Williams, R. & Tollett J. (2000). The non-designers web book. Berkeley, CA: Peachpit Press. Winston, R.B. Jr., Creamer, D.G., & Miller, T.K. (2001). The professional student affairs administrator. New York: Brunner-Routledge.


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