Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Virtual Case Study: 5 Hot Topics in Technology CANISIUS COLLEGE Maggie Bach Amy Feder Jennifer Lenfant Eddie Wright CANISIUS COLLEGE Maggie Bach Amy Feder.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Virtual Case Study: 5 Hot Topics in Technology CANISIUS COLLEGE Maggie Bach Amy Feder Jennifer Lenfant Eddie Wright CANISIUS COLLEGE Maggie Bach Amy Feder."— Presentation transcript:

1 Virtual Case Study: 5 Hot Topics in Technology CANISIUS COLLEGE Maggie Bach Amy Feder Jennifer Lenfant Eddie Wright CANISIUS COLLEGE Maggie Bach Amy Feder Jennifer Lenfant Eddie Wright

2 5 HOT TOPICS 1.BLOGS 2.INSTITUTIONAL SPAM 3.ONLINE SOCIAL NETWORKING 4.ILLEGAL DOWNLOADING 5.SMART CLASSROOMS 1.BLOGS 2.INSTITUTIONAL SPAM 3.ONLINE SOCIAL NETWORKING 4.ILLEGAL DOWNLOADING 5.SMART CLASSROOMS

3 ONLINE BLOGS

4 What is a blog? A blog can be best described as an online journal or diary. They are meant to reach the general public or a specific audience (ex. Chemistry scholars or incoming students). Blogs can be anecdotal, topic-driven, or discussion-based. Readers can leave comments in a discussion board manner. A blog can be best described as an online journal or diary. They are meant to reach the general public or a specific audience (ex. Chemistry scholars or incoming students). Blogs can be anecdotal, topic-driven, or discussion-based. Readers can leave comments in a discussion board manner.

5 Why is blogging relevant? Students are using blogs… – As a means for self-expression – As a way to communication with one another Faculty members are using blogs… – To keep an academic journal; a non-traditional way of publishing. – To inspire class discussion online. Student Affairs professionals are using blogs… – To connect new students to each other. – As recruitment tools. – To stay in touch with students. Students are using blogs… – As a means for self-expression – As a way to communication with one another Faculty members are using blogs… – To keep an academic journal; a non-traditional way of publishing. – To inspire class discussion online. Student Affairs professionals are using blogs… – To connect new students to each other. – As recruitment tools. – To stay in touch with students.

6 Use and Benefits of Blogs On-Campus Student journals – Study abroad journals detailing student experience. – RA journals for Hall Director. – Journals that prospective students can read and comment on. Student Affairs professional journals – Giving recognition to students. – Detailing operations of the office for student readers. – Career blogs for use in a Career Center. Student journals – Study abroad journals detailing student experience. – RA journals for Hall Director. – Journals that prospective students can read and comment on. Student Affairs professional journals – Giving recognition to students. – Detailing operations of the office for student readers. – Career blogs for use in a Career Center.

7 Problems and Issues Blogs dont work well as discussion boards (Krause, 2005). Personal information can be put online causing security concerns. Student blogs for institutional purposes, trust the student to properly represent the institution which they may not. Blogs dont work well as discussion boards (Krause, 2005). Personal information can be put online causing security concerns. Student blogs for institutional purposes, trust the student to properly represent the institution which they may not.

8 INSTITUTIONAL SPAM Defined as: A subset of general statements in acceptable-use policies about the responsibility that network system operators have to regulate the system for optimal functionality (Mitrano 2003, p.87). Defined as: A subset of general statements in acceptable-use policies about the responsibility that network system operators have to regulate the system for optimal functionality (Mitrano 2003, p.87).

9 INSTITUTIONAL SPAM cont. Why is this important? By filtering all institutional messages through one central officer, the content and amount of information going out to members of the institution can be better regulated and monitored Institutional Relations Officers with input from administrative heads should make these policies because they represent the institution in all official public formats Why is this important? By filtering all institutional messages through one central officer, the content and amount of information going out to members of the institution can be better regulated and monitored Institutional Relations Officers with input from administrative heads should make these policies because they represent the institution in all official public formats

10 INSTITUTIONAL SPAM cont. Benefits Communication with the Net generation on their level Approval of messages ensures only official college communications are being shared via the list serves Creates electronic paper trail which can be tracked back to specific individuals in the event an issue should arise Benefits Communication with the Net generation on their level Approval of messages ensures only official college communications are being shared via the list serves Creates electronic paper trail which can be tracked back to specific individuals in the event an issue should arise

11 INSTITUTIONAL SPAM cont. Issues If all offices have access to the list serves, many emails can be sent out in one day creating a pile up in a students email account. With a magnitude of emails in an inbox, the student may delete all instead of reading any pertinent information. If a central office filter is not in place, and students gain access to the list serves, then unofficial messages could be sent in the institutions name. Issues If all offices have access to the list serves, many emails can be sent out in one day creating a pile up in a students email account. With a magnitude of emails in an inbox, the student may delete all instead of reading any pertinent information. If a central office filter is not in place, and students gain access to the list serves, then unofficial messages could be sent in the institutions name.

12 POLICING ONLINE SOCIAL NETWORKING

13 What is Online Social Networking? Online Social Networks are internet based communities aimed at providing a way for people to keep in touch with old friends or meet new people. Members can form groups, post photos and comment on each others pages. Examples include: www.facebook.com www.myspace.com www.friendster.com What is Online Social Networking? Online Social Networks are internet based communities aimed at providing a way for people to keep in touch with old friends or meet new people. Members can form groups, post photos and comment on each others pages. Examples include: www.facebook.com www.myspace.com www.friendster.com

14 POLICING ONLINE SOCIAL NETWORKING Who are these networks for? Originally, facebook.com was created solely for college and university networks. It gave students, faculty, and staff a chance to connect online. Since then, however, it has been opened up to corporations, high schools and even geographic regions. Myspace.com is open more widely to the general public. It has a large focus on the music industry. Friendster.com is also open to the general public but more popular worldwide then in the U.S. Who are these networks for? Originally, facebook.com was created solely for college and university networks. It gave students, faculty, and staff a chance to connect online. Since then, however, it has been opened up to corporations, high schools and even geographic regions. Myspace.com is open more widely to the general public. It has a large focus on the music industry. Friendster.com is also open to the general public but more popular worldwide then in the U.S.

15 POLICING ONLINE SOCIAL NETWORKING Why Online Social Networking? Online Social Communities are nothing new to the world of higher education. Sites like facebook.com, myspace.com, and friendster.com have been the focus of much media attention for years. As administrators learn about the sites, new issues are created. There has been much controversy on numerous campus surrounding the use of these site in judicial investigations. Why Online Social Networking? Online Social Communities are nothing new to the world of higher education. Sites like facebook.com, myspace.com, and friendster.com have been the focus of much media attention for years. As administrators learn about the sites, new issues are created. There has been much controversy on numerous campus surrounding the use of these site in judicial investigations.

16 POLICING ONLINE SOCIAL NETWORKING What students (and many administrators) dont know: Even after online photos and comments are deleted from sites such as myspace.com or facebook.com, they can often still be found through a simple google search. Despite extreme privacy settings offered by facebook.com, there are ways to obtain personal information provided in profiles. What students (and many administrators) dont know: Even after online photos and comments are deleted from sites such as myspace.com or facebook.com, they can often still be found through a simple google search. Despite extreme privacy settings offered by facebook.com, there are ways to obtain personal information provided in profiles.

17 POLICING ONLINE SOCIAL NETWORKING BENEFITS Gives students an opportunity to connect with classmates. Provides a unique way for Professors to keep in contact with students. Students are able to keep in touch with friends from home and at school. Provides a more diverse professional network for students after graduation. Gives students the opportunity to find people with similar interests as them (political, social, religious etc.) Gives administrators a chance to intercept unauthorized events before their occurrence. Can be used by Greek life advisors to make sure Greek organizations are properly representing themselves and the school. BENEFITS Gives students an opportunity to connect with classmates. Provides a unique way for Professors to keep in contact with students. Students are able to keep in touch with friends from home and at school. Provides a more diverse professional network for students after graduation. Gives students the opportunity to find people with similar interests as them (political, social, religious etc.) Gives administrators a chance to intercept unauthorized events before their occurrence. Can be used by Greek life advisors to make sure Greek organizations are properly representing themselves and the school.

18 POLICING ONLINE SOCIAL NETWORKING ISSUES Students can post pictures and thoughts that might not coincide with the mission of the college. Students can represent themselves in any way they choose in their profiles, even if its not accurate information. Employers are checking out these profiles and discounting well qualified students based on their online profiles. If administrators restrict use of these networks, students tend to feel that their rights are being violated. Students may discontinue the use of these networks if they feel they do not have personal privacy. Therefore, they would not reap any of the benefits of its positive aspects. ISSUES Students can post pictures and thoughts that might not coincide with the mission of the college. Students can represent themselves in any way they choose in their profiles, even if its not accurate information. Employers are checking out these profiles and discounting well qualified students based on their online profiles. If administrators restrict use of these networks, students tend to feel that their rights are being violated. Students may discontinue the use of these networks if they feel they do not have personal privacy. Therefore, they would not reap any of the benefits of its positive aspects.

19 ILLEGAL DOWNLOADING Colleges and universities are being held responsible for students illegally downloading music, movies and/or computer software. Definition - To transfer copyrighted data or programs from a server or host computer to one's own computer or device ( The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language) Colleges and universities are being held responsible for students illegally downloading music, movies and/or computer software. Definition - To transfer copyrighted data or programs from a server or host computer to one's own computer or device ( The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language)

20 ILLEGAL DOWNLOADING cont. BENEFITS Create awareness amongst students, staff and faculty Prevent it from occurring on the campus network Implement a peer-to-peer disciplinary agreement with the corporations seeking remunerations Avoid lawsuits under the Digital Millenium Copyright Act BENEFITS Create awareness amongst students, staff and faculty Prevent it from occurring on the campus network Implement a peer-to-peer disciplinary agreement with the corporations seeking remunerations Avoid lawsuits under the Digital Millenium Copyright Act

21 ILLEGAL DOWNLOADING cont. ISSUES Difficult to monitor and enforce Requires collaboration of ITS, Residence Life, Judicial Affairs and various corporations – Motion Picture Association of America – Recording Industry Association of America – Business Software Alliance ISSUES Difficult to monitor and enforce Requires collaboration of ITS, Residence Life, Judicial Affairs and various corporations – Motion Picture Association of America – Recording Industry Association of America – Business Software Alliance

22 SMART CLASSROOMS Defined as: a classroom with technology equipped for to meet the demands of the net generation SMART – Shared Multimedia Access to Resources for Teaching Academic lives of our students should meet the technological needs of the Net Generation Defined as: a classroom with technology equipped for to meet the demands of the net generation SMART – Shared Multimedia Access to Resources for Teaching Academic lives of our students should meet the technological needs of the Net Generation

23 SMART CLASSROOMS cont. BENEFITS Enhances faculty teaching style to match current students learning style Incorporates current affairs and advances with textbook facts Instant feedback for instructors to gauge student learning BENEFITS Enhances faculty teaching style to match current students learning style Incorporates current affairs and advances with textbook facts Instant feedback for instructors to gauge student learning

24 SMART CLASSROOMS cont. ISSUES Giving faculty resources but no proper training, thus making them less effective Institutional Loss – money is spent on new technology and faculty do not use it Loss of Attention as students go online or work on other things while in class ISSUES Giving faculty resources but no proper training, thus making them less effective Institutional Loss – money is spent on new technology and faculty do not use it Loss of Attention as students go online or work on other things while in class

25 References T 10 Techniques to change your teaching [Electronic version]. (2005). The Chronicle of Higher Education, 51 (42), B1. Bradley, D. L. (2004). Music piracy on college campuses. Retrieved January 15, 2007, from the University of Vermont IT News Web Site http://www.uvm.edu/ets/IT-news/200412/feature/musicpiracy.pdf Carlson, S. (2001). New company besieges colleges with notices about copyright violations [Electronic version]. The Chronicle of Higher Education, A29. downloading. (n.d.). The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition. Retrieved February 12, 2007, from Dictionary.com website: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/downloading Eolas Technologies, Inc. and the Regents of the University of California v. Microsoft Corp., 457 F.3d 1279 (2006) Johnson, D., & Henry, S. (2006). Downloading and file-sharing activity of college graduates entering the workforce can impact their job prospects, says new study. Business Software Alliance. Retrieved January 15, 2007, from http:// www.bsa.org/usa/press/newsreleases/DTL-Graduates.cfm www.bsa.org/usa/press/newsreleases/DTL-Graduates.cfm Kiernan, V. (2002). Film studios want colleges to block students from downloading movies [Electronic version]. The Chronicle of Higher Education, 49 (7), A37. Krause, S. D. (2005). Blogs as tools for teaching [Electronic version]. The Chronicle of Higher Education, 51 (42), B33. T 10 Techniques to change your teaching [Electronic version]. (2005). The Chronicle of Higher Education, 51 (42), B1. Bradley, D. L. (2004). Music piracy on college campuses. Retrieved January 15, 2007, from the University of Vermont IT News Web Site http://www.uvm.edu/ets/IT-news/200412/feature/musicpiracy.pdf Carlson, S. (2001). New company besieges colleges with notices about copyright violations [Electronic version]. The Chronicle of Higher Education, A29. downloading. (n.d.). The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition. Retrieved February 12, 2007, from Dictionary.com website: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/downloading Eolas Technologies, Inc. and the Regents of the University of California v. Microsoft Corp., 457 F.3d 1279 (2006) Johnson, D., & Henry, S. (2006). Downloading and file-sharing activity of college graduates entering the workforce can impact their job prospects, says new study. Business Software Alliance. Retrieved January 15, 2007, from http:// www.bsa.org/usa/press/newsreleases/DTL-Graduates.cfm www.bsa.org/usa/press/newsreleases/DTL-Graduates.cfm Kiernan, V. (2002). Film studios want colleges to block students from downloading movies [Electronic version]. The Chronicle of Higher Education, 49 (7), A37. Krause, S. D. (2005). Blogs as tools for teaching [Electronic version]. The Chronicle of Higher Education, 51 (42), B33.

26 References Mitrano, T. (2003). Resolving information technology policy issues on the networked campus [Electronic version] (P. A. McClure, Ed.). Jossey-Bass Inc. News 8 - KFMB Stations. (2006, February 23). Smart classrooms make higher education high-tech. San Diego, CA: Midwest Television. Retrieved February 15, 2007, from News 8 - KFMB Stations, San Diego, California Web site: http://www.kfmb.com/ printable/ ?id=40172 Read, B. (2005). Coming soon to a campus near you: Movie industry lawsuits [Electronic version]. The Chronicle of Higher Education, 51 (19), A31. Young, J. R. (2004). When good technology means bad teaching [Electronic version]. The Chronicle of Higher Education, 51 (12), A31. Mitrano, T. (2003). Resolving information technology policy issues on the networked campus [Electronic version] (P. A. McClure, Ed.). Jossey-Bass Inc. News 8 - KFMB Stations. (2006, February 23). Smart classrooms make higher education high-tech. San Diego, CA: Midwest Television. Retrieved February 15, 2007, from News 8 - KFMB Stations, San Diego, California Web site: http://www.kfmb.com/ printable/ ?id=40172 Read, B. (2005). Coming soon to a campus near you: Movie industry lawsuits [Electronic version]. The Chronicle of Higher Education, 51 (19), A31. Young, J. R. (2004). When good technology means bad teaching [Electronic version]. The Chronicle of Higher Education, 51 (12), A31.


Download ppt "Virtual Case Study: 5 Hot Topics in Technology CANISIUS COLLEGE Maggie Bach Amy Feder Jennifer Lenfant Eddie Wright CANISIUS COLLEGE Maggie Bach Amy Feder."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google