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Joseph Shannon, Deputy Chief Academic Officer International Center for Leadership in Education Navigating the School Improvement Grants Joseph Shannon,

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1 Joseph Shannon, Deputy Chief Academic Officer International Center for Leadership in Education Navigating the School Improvement Grants Joseph Shannon, Deputy Chief Academic Officer International Center for Leadership in Education

2 To hear this webinar you will need to choose your audio mode. Go to the control panel in the upper right corner of your screen and click the button of how you will be listening. Your choices: Use telephone Use mic & speakers If using mic & speakers make sure your volume is turned up so you can hear If using the telephone Dial: Access Code: Audio PIN: unique PIN shown in audio control panel on screen Technical difficulties? Contact (518) All participants are on mute.

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4 Webinar Guidelines All participants are on mute during the entire webinar. Presentation portion will be 45 minutes Questions and Answers portion will be 15 minutes To ask a question type it in the question control panel in the upper right corner of your screen. Content questions will be answered in the order they were received at the end of the webinar presentation. Todays PowerPoint and archived webinar will be sent to you in a follow up .

5 Agenda School Improvement Grants and ARRA Which schools are eligible to receive funding Requirements of the four federal models of school reform - Restart, Closure, Transformation, and Turnaround Data and information required in district applications for the SIG Grant-writing tips and recommendations

6 NCLB Accountability Schools Eligible for SIG 13,457 Schools = in some form of improvement status under NCLB 4,941 Schools = in some form of restructuring status (planning + implementation) 3,200 Schools = Restructuring Implementation

7 NCLB Definition of Struggling Schools Title I schools that fail to make AYP for: – 2+ consecutive years are in improvement –after 4 years are in corrective action –after 5 years are in restructuring (year 5 = planning year; year 6 = implementation)

8 Current NCLB Definition of Struggling Schools and must do one of the following: –Close and reopen as charter –Contract with private management company –Replace all or most staff –State management, or –Other major governance restructuring that makes fundamental reforms [most common option taken]

9 States traditionally select the least rigorous (if any) intervention option for struggling schools Of the 45 states with schools in restructuring in SY , 29 selected other as their restructuring strategy Very few schools reported any of the named NCLB interventions, including: Replacing all or most of the school staff (17%) State takeover of the school (3%) Reopening the school as a public charter school (1%) or Contracting with a private entity to manage the school (1%) From ED, State and Local Implementation of the No Child Left Behind Act, Volume IX Accountability Under NCLB: Final Report, 2009 (forthcoming)

10 School Improvement Grants (SIGs) and the 2009 American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA) FY2009 : –$546 Million from Title I –$3 billion for School Improvement Grants from ARRA –$3.546 Billion total Unprecedented Funding

11 Goal for FY09 and ARRA School Improvement Funds Target each states: Chronically low-performing schools Dramatically transform school culture and increase student achievement.

12 States Eligible to Date for SIG 26 states and the District of Columbia have been awarded SIG funds Distributed to states by formula Distributed to districts based on competitive application School district must have a state-identified "persistently lowest achieving" or a Tier III school

13 State SIG Awards StateAwardStateAward Alabama58MColorado40M Kentucky56MMissouri54M Oklahoma39MAlaska10.7M Virginia58.8MArizona70M Nevada23.4MN. Mexico28M Utah17.4MN. Carolina91M South Dakota11.3MIowa18M Connecticut25.7MGeorgia122M Texas338MIndiana61M Ohio132MMaryland47M S. Carolina50.8MDC12M

14 Agenda School Improvement Grants and ARRA Which schools are eligible to receive funding Requirements of the four federal models of school reform - Restart, Closure, Transformation, and Turnaround Data and information required in district applications for the SIG Grant-writing tips and recommendations

15 Which schools will receive SIG funds? There are three tiers of schools that are eligible for SIG funds

16 Tier I Schools The states bottom 5% of Title I schools in improvement, corrective action, or restructuring (or the states bottom 5 lowest-achieving Title I schools, whichever is greater). LEAs must prioritize their Tier I schools (i.e., LEAs cannot apply for SIG funds solely for Tiers II or III)

17 Tier II Schools The states Title I eligible (but not necessarily participating) secondary schools with equivalently poor performance as Tier I schools

18 Tier III Schools Tier III: (only for SEAs that have sufficient funding for all Tier I and II schools and still have a surplus of SIG funds) Any state Title I school in improvement, corrective action, or restructuring

19 Tier Schools by State StateTier ITier IITier III Arizona Indiana Louisiana Mississippi691125

20 Agenda School Improvement Grants and ARRA Which schools are eligible to receive funding Requirements of the four federal models of school reform - Restart, Closure, Transformation, and Turnaround Data and information required in district applications for the SIG Grant-writing tips and recommendations

21 Schools applying for SIG funds can select between four models 1.Turnaround Model 2.Restart Model 3.School Closure Model 4.Transformational Model

22 Turnaround Model Replace principal and at least 50% of the staff Adopt new governance, and implement a new or revised instructional program Incorporate interventions that take into account the recruitment, placement and development of staff to ensure they meet student needs Schedules that increase time for both students and staff Appropriate social-emotional and community- oriented services/supports.

23 Restart Model Close the school and restart it under the management of a charter school operator, a charter management organization (CMO), or an educational management organization (EMO) A restart school must admit, within the grades it serves, any former student who wishes to attend

24 Closure Model Closing the school and enrolling the students who attended the school in other, higher-performing schools in the LEA The International Center does not support this option

25 Transformation Model Replace the principal who led the school prior to the transformation model Identify and reward school leaders, teachers, and other staff who improve student achievement outcomes Develop teacher and leader effectiveness Provide high quality job-embedded professional development to staff Develop a comprehensive instructional programs using student achievement data: Extend learning time and create community-oriented schools Provide operating flexibility and intensive support

26 Mandated Strategies 1.Developing teacher and school leader effectiveness 2.Comprehensive instructional reform strategies 3.Extending learning time and creating community-oriented schools 4.Ensuring sufficient operating flexibility

27 Developing teacher and leader effectiveness Operating, flexibility, and sustainable support Comprehensive Instructional Reform Strategy Extending learning time and creating community- oriented schools

28 Developing teacher and leader effectiveness

29 Teacher and Leader Effectiveness Effective teacher evaluation system based on student performance Action plan to recruit, train, and retain quality teachers Community Resource Team Extended school day Flexible school conditions

30 Developing teacher and leader effectiveness Comprehensive Instructional Reform Strategy

31 Instructional Reform Strategies 1.Teacher Evaluation System (TES) based on Student Performance –Use of SAS EVAAS to examine linkage between teacher and student performance –Formative and summative assessments in core academic areas –Observation of teacher performance –Professional development for teachers based on TES –Career pathways for teachers/staff

32 Instructional Reform Strategies 2.Effective Teaching –Teacher observation using the Collaborative Instructional Review Process –Accountability Measures –Job-Embedded Coaching –Professional Dialogue/Communities –Targeted Professional Development

33 Instructional Reform Strategies 3.Programs/Interventions –Implement specific inclusion and co- teaching strategies to improve performance of SWD –Small Learning Communities –Expand the End-of-Course and benchmark assessments –Implement, monitor, and adjust student interventions (RTI) –Increase opportunities for students to take college credit bearing courses

34 Developing teacher and leader effectiveness Comprehensive Instructional Reform Strategy Extending learning time and creating community- oriented schools

35 Extended Learning Time Provide more time for students to learn core academic content by expanding the school day, the school week, or the school year Provide more time for teachers to collaborate Provide more time or opportunities for enrichment activities for students

36 Community-Oriented Schools Develop parent/community partnerships to support Transformational Interventions Increase parent and community participation in school-wide decision and events Increase parent and community awareness of the impact of poverty on student achievement Provide parents and community members with strategies to reverse the impact of poverty on student achievement Leverage business and community partnerships

37 Developing teacher and leader effectiveness Operating, flexibility, and sustainable support Comprehensive Instructional Reform Strategy Extending learning time and creating community- oriented schools

38 Operating Flexibility Adopt board policy to provide school leaders with sufficient operating flexibility (including in staffing, calendars/time, and budgeting) to implement fully a comprehensive approach to substantially improve student achievement outcomes Alignment of district and school administration with collective bargaining units Unwavering commitment to Transformation

39 Developing teacher and leader effectiveness Operating, flexibility, and sustainable support Comprehensive Instructional Reform Strategy Extending learning time and creating community- oriented schools

40 Agenda School Improvement Grants and ARRA Which schools are eligible to receive funding Requirements of the four federal models of school reform - Restart, Closure, Transformation, and Turnaround Data and information required in district applications for the SIG Grant-writing tips and recommendations

41 State Applications Competitive Application Process Scored by Rubric Points awarded for bold, innovative strategies Implementation plan between now and 2013 Accountability targets Budget

42 State Applications /summary/index.html /summary/index.html

43 Data and Information Needed to Complete Application for Turnaround and Transformation Model Approved Needs Assessment Annual Goals for Student Achievement (3 years) Intervention Plan if Targets are not met Justification for chosen model Process for selecting and evaluating external providers

44 Data and Information Needed to Complete Application for Turnaround and Transformation Model Required Activities – The LEA Must: –Implement the four mandated strategies –Description between now and June 30, 2010 –Description between July 1, 2010-June 20,2013 –Implementation Schedule

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46 Data and Information Needed to Complete Application for Turnaround and Transformation Model Permissible Activities –Supportive strategies –Description between now and June 30, 2010 –Description between July 1, 2010-June 20,2013 –Implementation Schedule

47 Accountability Leading Indicators: Number of minutes in a school year Participation rate on state assessments by subgroup Dropout rates Student attendance rates Number and percentage of students completing advanced coursework

48 Accountability Leading Indicators: Discipline incidents Truancy Distribution of teachers by performance levels on teacher evaluation system Teacher attendance

49 Agenda School Improvement Grants and ARRA Which schools are eligible to receive funding Requirements of the four federal models of school reform - Restart, Closure, Transformation, and Turnaround Data and information required in district applications for the SIG Grant-writing tips and recommendations

50 SIG Funding Mass Insights publication The Turnaround Challenge presents one estimate of the per-school cost of a turnaround effort based on likely expenditures for extending learning time, employing additional staff, professional development and performance bonuses to staff, engaging outside partners, and overseeing the effort at the district level

51 Funding Levels Student Enrollment ClosureTransformationTurnaround/ Restart 1-199$100K-150K$325K-375K$375K-425K $125K-175K$350K-400K$400K-450K $150K-200K$375K-425K$425K-475K 600+$175K-225K$400K-450K$450K-500K

52 Planning and Preparing Starting now, work with LEAs, unions, and other stakeholders to: Identify Tier I and Tier II schools so that LEAs can plan effectively Review and eliminate policies and practices that are barriers to reform Diagnose causes of failure and appropriate interventions for lowest performing schools Develop or refine process to recruit, screen and select necessary outside partners and providers

53 Planning and Preparing Starting now, work with LEAs, unions, and other stakeholders to: Fairly and rigorously evaluate teachers and leaders in lowest performing schools Recruit and train turnaround and transformation principals, school leaders and teachers Begin outreach to parents, students and community stakeholders Allocate existing funds such as 1003(a) and Title I A to support planning efforts

54 Questions

55 Year 1 Project Overview

56 Phase 1 Assessing School Conditions Needs Assessment –Three-day visit to each school based on comprehensive school profile and data analysis –Administration of Leadership Assessment to school-based leadership team –School profile report including a list of top priorities and specific recommendations. –Completion of the Components of School Excellence and Learning Criteria rubrics –Submission of final Needs Assessment Report

57 Phase 2 School Improvement Planning –Review needs assessment findings –Building ownership for school priority goals –Individualized Action Plan (IAP) based on the needs assessment. The action plan includes: Prioritized goals Strategic actions Accountability Measures Professional development needs Challenges and obstacles Timeline, roles and responsibilities

58 Phase 3 Implementation and Capacity Building Principal and Leadership Teams implementation of transformational interventions: 1.Make difficult decisions regarding people, time, money, and programs 2.Assist in recruitment, training, and retention of quality teachers 3.implementation of a teacher evaluation and reward system based on student performance

59 Phase 3 Implementation and Capacity Building 4. Extend learning time 5. Develop parent/community partnerships to support Transformational Interventions 6. Leverage business and community partnerships

60 Phase 3 Implementation and Capacity Building Improve Teacher Effectiveness: Develop content expertise Individualize teaching based on student data Develop teacher and leader effectiveness based on the Rigor/Relevance Framework Implement the Collaborative Instructional Review process

61 Phase 3 Implementation and Capacity Building Integration of literacy strategies into each grade level and content areas Improve student engagement Develop shared responsibility for student achievement Implement effective use of common planning time

62 Unique Benefits of ICLE Dr. Bill Daggett - consultation, communication, large-group facilitation 19 years experience with high quality contract management and quality assurance Proven ability to successfully implement large scale initiatives (e.g. Philadelphia) Resources to build system-wide capacity Alignment to four assurances (ESEA/IDEA/Perkins and FL RTTF) Team of national consultants Expertise in job-embedded instructional leadership coaching Experience in leadership-and professional development- conference management Expertise facilitating teacher networking, train-the-trainer processes and mentor coaching, benchmarking, process validation

63 Q & A with Joe This is the end of the presentation portion. Submit questions at this time and stay on to hear the answers. If you are logging off, thank you for attending and we will you with follow-up information. For more information

64 School Tranformational/Turnaround Intervention Models (518) | | Thank you for attending!

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66 18 th Annual Model Schools Conference Monday, June 14 - Thursday, June 17 Orlando


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