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International Center for Leadership in Education Dr. Willard R. Daggett Whole School Reform – A New Model for Leadership and Change.

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Presentation on theme: "International Center for Leadership in Education Dr. Willard R. Daggett Whole School Reform – A New Model for Leadership and Change."— Presentation transcript:

1 International Center for Leadership in Education Dr. Willard R. Daggett Whole School Reform – A New Model for Leadership and Change

2 International Center Finding Nations top performing Nations most rapidly improving

3 School Improvement End in Mind

4 School Improvement End in Mind –Rigor/Relevance ALL

5 Application Model 1. Knowledge in one discipline 2. Application within discipline 3. Application across disciplines 4. Application to real-world predictable situations 5. Application to real-world unpredictable situations

6 Rigor/Relevance For All Students

7 1.Awareness 2.Comprehension 3.Application 4.Analysis 5.Synthesis 6.Evaluation Knowledge Taxonomy Knowledge Taxonomy

8 Application Model 1. Knowledge in one discipline 2. Application within discipline 3. Application across disciplines 4. Application to real-world predictable situations 5. Application to real-world unpredictable situations

9 Levels CDCDABABCDCDABAB Blooms Application

10 12345 Application Knowledge Rigor/Relevance Framework

11 A B D C Express probabilities as fractions, percents, or decimals. Classify triangles according to angle size and/or length of sides. Calculate volume of simple three- dimensional shapes. Given the coordinates of a quadrilateral, plot the quadrilateral on a grid. Analyze the graphs of the perimeters and areas of squares having different-length sides. Determine the largest rectangular area for a fixed perimeter. Identify coordinates for ordered pairs that satisfy an algebraic relation or function. Determine and justify the similarity or congruence for two geometric shapes. Obtain historical data about local weather to predict the chance of snow, rain, or sun during year. Test consumer products and illustrate the data graphically. Plan a large school event and calculate resources (food, decorations, etc.) you need to organize and hold this event. Make a scale drawing of the classroom on grid paper, each group using a different scale. Calculate percentages of advertising in a newspaper. Tour the school building and identify examples of parallel and perpendicular lines, planes, and angles. Determine the median and mode of real data displayed in a histogram Organize and display collected data, using appropriate tables, charts, or graphs.

12 A B D C Rigor/Relevance Framework Analyze the graphs of the perimeters and areas of squares having different-length sides. Determine the largest rectangular area for a fixed perimeter. Identify coordinates for ordered pairs that satisfy an algebraic relation or function. Determine and justify the similarity or congruence for two geometric shapes. Obtain historical data about local weather to predict the chance of snow, rain, or sun during year. Test consumer products and illustrate the data graphically. Plan a large school event and calculate resources (food, decorations, etc.) you need to organize and hold this event. Make a scale drawing of the classroom on grid paper, each group using a different scale. Calculate percentages of advertising in a newspaper. Tour the school building and identify examples of parallel and perpendicular lines, planes, and angles. Determine the median and mode of real data displayed in a histogram Organize and display collected data, using appropriate tables, charts, or graphs. Express probabilities as fractions, percents, or decimals. Classify triangles according to angle size and/or length of sides. Calculate volume of simple three- dimensional shapes. Given the coordinates of a quadrilateral, plot the quadrilateral on a grid.

13 A B D C Rigor/Relevance Framework Express probabilities as fractions, percents, or decimals. Classify triangles according to angle size and/or length of sides. Calculate volume of simple three- dimensional shapes. Given the coordinates of a quadrilateral, plot the quadrilateral on a grid. Analyze the graphs of the perimeters and areas of squares having different-length sides. Determine the largest rectangular area for a fixed perimeter. Identify coordinates for ordered pairs that satisfy an algebraic relation or function. Determine and justify the similarity or congruence for two geometric shapes. Obtain historical data about local weather to predict the chance of snow, rain, or sun during year. Test consumer products and illustrate the data graphically. Plan a large school event and calculate resources (food, decorations, etc.) you need to organize and hold this event. Make a scale drawing of the classroom on grid paper, each group using a different scale. Calculate percentages of advertising in a newspaper. Tour the school building and identify examples of parallel and perpendicular lines, planes, and angles. Determine the median and mode of real data displayed in a histogram Organize and display collected data, using appropriate tables, charts, or graphs.

14 Levels CDCDABABCDCDABAB Blooms Application

15 A B D C Calculate with numbers, including decimals, ratios, percents, and fractions. Understand two-dimensional motion and trajectories by separating the motion of an object into x and y components.

16 School Improvement End in Mind –Rigor/Relevance ALL –Learning Criteria

17 Ray McNulty Senior Vice President, ICLE February 2008 San Diego, CA

18 Education exists in the larger context of society.

19 When society changes – so too must education if it is to remain viable!

20 Change Model International Center for Leadership in Education WHY Prepare students for their future

21 Change Model International Center for Leadership in Education WHY

22 Change Model International Center for Leadership in Education WHY W H A T Rigor, Relevance, Relationships for ALL Students

23 Change Model International Center for Leadership in Education WHY W H A T Where are you? Where do you want to go? W H E R E Learning Criteria for 21st Century Learners

24 Made to Stick by Chip and Dan Heath Made to Stick by Chip and Dan Heath

25 Six Principles Simplicity Unexpectedness Concreteness Credibility Emotions Stories

26 Focus On Simplicity Finding the essential core of our ideas? COMMANDERS INTENT.. No Plan survives contact with the enemy! …Like writing a plan to have your friend play chess for you……. Southwest Airlines Commanders Intent We Are the Low-Fare Airline

27 Educators Commanders Intent Develop and implement plans to support and enhance 21 st Century Teaching & Learning

28 The Learning Criteria

29 How do you want learning evaluated?

30

31 The video of the movie Star Wars earned $193,500,000 in rental fees during its first year. Expressed in scientific notation, the number of dollars earned is: (1)1935 x 10 8 (3) x 10 6 (2) x 10 6 (4) x 10 8

32 (4) x 10 8

33 Evaluation Systems Many of our systems are incomplete because we over measure some things and not measure enough of others.

34 The Learning Criteria helps you put into action what you believe about learning.

35 Success Beyond the Test Core Academics Stretch Learning Learner Engagement Personal Skill Development International Center for Leadership in Education, Inc. Rigor Relevance Relationships

36 Learning Criteria to Support Rigor, Relevance & Relationships Every school has its own DNA. School success is measurable beyond the tests. Data must drive school improvement initiatives. School growth and continuous improvement is an ongoing, collaborative process. International Center for Leadership in Education, Inc.

37 Sustainable Results In many cases, hard data is the total focus at the exclusion of soft data in our systems. This results in a short-term solution but a long- term mistake!!!!!

38 The Learning Criteria to Support 21st Century Learners ©

39 Criteria Core Academic Learning (Achievement in the core subjects of English language arts, math and science and others identified by the school) Stretch Learning (Demonstration of rigorous and relevant learning beyond the minimum requirements) Personal Skill Development (Measures of personal, social, service, and leadership skills and demonstrations of positive behaviors and attitudes) Learner Engagement (The extent to which students are motivated and committed to learning; have a sense of belonging and accomplishment; and have relationships with adults, peers, and parents that support learning)

40 LEARNING CRITERIA GRID Student Outcomes School Performance SustainedDisaggregated Benchmarke d (Target)

41

42 Core Stretch Learner Engagement Personal Skill Development

43 Core Stretch Learner Engagement Personal Skill Development Dimensions of the Learning Criteria

44

45 Richard Jones Senior Consultant February 2008 San Diego, CA

46 WHY W H E R E W H A T H O W International Center for Leadership in Education Change Model Schools as Living Systems Framework

47 Mental Models influence our thoughts and actions!

48 What is your point of view? Point of View Video Clip

49 Story of blind men observing the elephant

50 Having a common mental model for your school? Each unique professional better understands common decisions Less miscommunication Easier to set organization goals Easier to judge progress Focuses innovation and change

51 What is a useful mental model for school improvement?

52 Schools Are A System Perform unique function Connected set of processes Inputs in form of students and resources Outputs in form of educated students

53 But, A Unique System All schools are different and communities are unique. An open system rather than a closed system, constantly influenced by the community. Education is about people and their human abilities and frailties who dont behave consistently. Things change regardless of what you do. When in doubt they try to keep the status quo

54 If people are machines, seeking to control us makes sense. But, if we live with the same forces intrinsic to all other life, then seeking to impose control through rigid structures is suicide. Margaret Wheatley

55 Schools as Living Systems Framework Organization drives function The goal is to isolate from external influences There is a well-defined beginning and end Control is through clear processes and procedures Innovation uses design prototypes and research Function drives organization The goal is to adapt to external influences Beginning/end are flexible, focus on constant growth Influence through leadership and social networks Innovation uses experiments and risk-taking In Most Systems:In School Systems:

56 56 What are the characteristics of a healthy living system?

57 Living things are made of cells.are made of cells. obtain and use energy.obtain and use energy. grow and develop.grow and develop. reproduce.reproduce. adapt to their environment.adapt to their environment. Learning from Life Living schools have identity vitality maturity sustainability adaptability 19

58 School Improvement - Learning from Life Schools Strive for Vitality, Identity, Maturity, Adaptability and Sustainability Positive Characteristics of All Living Things 20

59 How do living systems change?

60 Living System Framework Biological communities change by Sensing Environment Building Relationships Modeling Others Managing Resources Taking Risks Living Schools change by Adapting Best Practices Using Data Collaborating Among Staff Allocating Staff and Funds Innovating and Planning

61 61 If leaders consider themselves leading living systems, how would they act?

62 Schools as Living Systems Framework Innovate Think long term Increase morale Improve teamwork Be flexible Collaborate Decentralize Avoid mistakes Deliver results now Cut costs Reduce Staff Respect the rules Compete Retain control Industrial (Closed) Systems Leaders: Living (Open) Systems Leaders:

63 63 What should professional learning be like in a living school system?

64 64 Skills and culture Internal collaboration Allow flexibility to innovate Connections Build on current knowledge Localized and personal Learn from everyone Learning everywhere Invest in trailblazers Train next generation Teach skills and ignore culture Use external experts Fixed standard procedures Isolated from other initiatives Introduce the hot topic Large scale Hierarchy Only PD people train Universal and equal Train only for their jobs Traditional Systems: Living Systems: 22

65 Follow a living system mental model? Schools ARE systems, but.... Open rather than closed systems, constantly influenced by the community. Learning is an organic process influenced by environment. Changes evolve rather than occur with precision. Leaders monitor and influence rather than control.

66 School Improvement End in Mind –Rigor/Relevance ALL –Learning Criteria –Future vs. Past

67 Challenges Globalization

68 Challenges Technology Globalization

69 Semantic Web Analyze Documents Analyze Documents Key words and headers Key words and headers Meaning/concepts Meaning/concepts Complete Task Complete Task

70 Challenges Technology Globalization Demographics

71 Challenges Technology Globalization Demographics Values / Beliefs

72 School Improvement End in Mind –Rigor/Relevance ALL –Learning Criteria –Future vs. Past Component

73 I. Needs Assessment –Learning Criteria

74 Eight Components to School Excellence 1. Embrace Common Vision and Goals for Rigor/Relevance/Relationships for ALL Students

75 Eight Components to School Excellence 1. Embrace Common Vision and Goals for Rigor/Relevance/Relationships for ALL Students 2. Inform Decisions through Data Systems

76 Criteria Core Academic Learning (Achievement in the core subjects of English language arts, math and science and others identified by the school) Stretch Learning (Demonstration of rigorous and relevant learning beyond the minimum requirements) Student Engagement (The extent to which students are motivated and committed to learning; have a sense of belonging and accomplishment; and have relationships with adults, peers, and parents that support learning) Personal Skill Development (Measures of personal, social, service, and leadership skills and demonstrations of positive behaviors and attitudes)

77 Eight Components to School Excellence 1. Embrace Common Vision and Goals for Rigor/Relevance/Relationships for ALL students 2. Inform Decisions through Data Systems 3. Empower Leadership Teams to Take Action and Innovate

78 Eight Components to School Excellence 1. Embrace Common Vision and Goals for Rigor/Relevance/Relationships for ALL Students 2. Inform Decisions through Data Systems 3. Empower Leadership Teams to Take Action and Innovate 4. Clarify Student Learning Expectations

79 CA STAR / CAHSEE English LA Benchmarks Tested

80 CA STAR / CAHSEE Test Mathematics Benchmarks Tested

81 California Career and Technical Education California Curriculum Content Standards English/Language Arts Grades 9 and 10 Excerpt Curriculum Survey of Essential Skills CAHSEECAHSEE STARSTAR Agriculture & Natural Resources Arts, Media, & Entertain- ment Building Trades & Construction Agriculture Business Agriculture Mechanics Agriscience Forestry & NaturalResources Animal Science Ornamental &Horticulture Plant & Soil Science Media & Design Arts Performing Arts Production & managerialArts Cabinetmaking & WoodProducts Engineering & HeavyConstruction Mechanical Construction Residential &CommercialConstruction 1.1 Identify and use the literal and figurative meanings of words and understand word derivations. e9HHMLMMMMMLMMLLLL 1.2 Distinguish between the denotative and connotative meanings of words and interpret the connotative power of words. e9HHMLMMMLMLMMLLLL 1.3 Identify Greek, Roman, and Norse mythology and use the knowledge to understand the origin and meaning of new words (e.g., the word narcissistic drawn from the myth of Narcissus and Echo). e9LMMLMLMLMLLLLLLL 2.1 Analyze the structure and format of functional workplace documents, including the graphics and headers, and explain how authors use the features to achieve their purposes. e29 e80 HHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH 2.2 Prepare a bibliography of reference materials for a report using a variety of consumer, workplace, and public documents. e36aLHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH

82 California Arts Education California Mathematics Standards/Benchmarks 5 th Grade CA Standards Test Visual ArtsDanceMusicTheatre 2.4 Understand the concept of multiplication and division of fractions. MHHHH 2.5 Compute and perform simple multiplication And division of fractions and apply these procedures to solving problems. MHHHH 1.1 Use information taken from a graph or equation to answer questions about a problem situation. MMMMM 1.4 Identify and graph ordered pairs in the four quadrants of the coordinate plane. HMLLL 1.5 Solve problems involving linear functions With integer values; write the equation; and graph The resulting ordered pairs of integers on a grid. HHLLL 1.2 Construct a cube and rectangular box from two-dimensional patterns and use these patterns to Compute the surface area for these objects. HHLLH 1.3 Understand the concept of volume and use the appropriate units in common measuring systems (i.e., cubic centimeter [cm 3 ], cubic meter [m 3 ], cubic inch [in 3 ], cubic yard [yd 3 ]) to compute the volume of rectangular solids. HHLLH

83 Eight Components to School Excellence 1. Embrace Common Vision and Goals for Rigor/Relevance/Relationships for ALL Students 2. Inform Decisions through Data Systems 3. Empower Leadership Teams to Take Action and Innovate 4. Clarify Student Learning Expectations

84 2005 Proficiency Grade 4 Reading Proficient Required NAEP Score Georgia 87 % North Carolina 82 % Texas 81 % Florida 71 % Massachusetts 48 % California 48 % South Carolina 35 %

85 2005 Proficiency Grade 4 Reading Proficient Required NAEP Score Georgia 87 %175 North Carolina 82 %183 Texas 81 %190 Florida 71 %202 Massachusetts 48 %234 California 48 %210 South Carolina 35 %228

86 2005 Proficiency Grade 8 Reading Proficient Required NAEP Score North Carolina 88 % Texas 83 % Georgia 83 % Florida 44 % California 39 % South Carolina 30 %

87 2005 Proficiency Grade 8 Reading Proficient Required NAEP Score North Carolina 88 %217 Texas 83 %225 Georgia 83 %224 Florida 44 %265 California 39 %262 South Carolina 30 %276

88 2005 Proficiency Grade 4 Mathematics Proficient Required NAEP Score North Carolina 91 % Texas 82 % Georgia 75 % Ohio 65 % Florida 63 % California 51 % South Carolina 39 % Massachusetts 39 %

89 2005 Proficiency Grade 4 Mathematics Proficient Required NAEP Score North Carolina 91 %203 Texas 82 %219 Georgia 75 %215 Ohio 65 %233 Florida 63 %230 California 51 %231 South Carolina 39 %246 Massachusetts 39 %255

90 2005 Proficiency Grade 8 Mathematics Proficient Required NAEP Score North Carolina 84 % Iowa 76 % Georgia 69 % Michigan 61 % Florida 58 % Massachusetts 42 % South Carolina 24 %

91 2005 Proficiency Grade 8 Mathematics Proficient Required NAEP Score North Carolina 84 %247 Iowa 76 %262 Georgia 69 %255 Michigan 61 %269 Florida 58 %269 Massachusetts 42 %301 South Carolina 24 %305

92 Lexile Framework ® for Reading Study Summary of Text Lexile Measures Text Lexile Measure (L) High School Literature College Literature High School Textbooks College Textbooks Military Personal Use Entry-Level Occupations SAT 1, ACT, AP* * Source of National Test Data: MetaMetrics Interquartile Ranges Shown (25% - 75%)

93 Eight Components to School Excellence 1. Embrace Common Vision and Goals for Rigor/Relevance/Relationships for ALL Students 2. Inform Decisions through Data Systems 3. Empower Leadership Teams to Take Action and Innovate 4. Clarify Student Learning Expectations

94 Eight Components to School Excellence 5. Adopt Effective Instructional Practices

95 Levels CDCDABABCDCDABAB Blooms Application

96 Sight Hearing A Input to Brain

97 Sight Connections / Pathways Hearing C Association Area

98 Sight Connections / Pathways Prefrontal Cortex Hearing C Association Area B D

99 Sight Connections / Pathways Prefrontal Cortex Hearing Association Area

100 Sight Connections / Pathways Prefrontal Cortex Hearing Association Area

101 Levels CDCDABABCDCDABAB Blooms Application

102

103

104 I CAN Learn ® Algebra What Works Clearinghouse: Recognized Evidence of Success US Dept.of Education: Promising Mathematics Program

105 Eight Components to School Excellence 6. Address Organizational Structures 5. Adopt Effective Instructional Practices

106 Eight Components to School Excellence 6. Address Organizational Structures 7. Monitor Progress/Improve Support Systems 5. Adopt Effective Instructional Practices

107 Levels CDCDABABCDCDABAB Blooms Application

108 Eight Components to School Excellence 6. Address Organizational Structures 7. Monitor Progress/Improve Support Systems 5. Adopt Effective Instructional Practices 8. Refine Process on an Ongoing Basis

109 What Works Rigor and Relevance Academics Into: –Arts –CTE Interdisciplinary Academies Electives in 9 th Grade Foreign Language Looping Technology –Read 180 –I CAN Learn

110 1587 Route 146 Rexford, NY Phone (518) Fax (518) International Center for Leadership in Education, Inc.


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