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Transitioning to the Smarter Balanced Assessment System North Carolina Superintendent Association Susan Gendron Senior Fellow International Center June.

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Presentation on theme: "Transitioning to the Smarter Balanced Assessment System North Carolina Superintendent Association Susan Gendron Senior Fellow International Center June."— Presentation transcript:

1 Transitioning to the Smarter Balanced Assessment System North Carolina Superintendent Association Susan Gendron Senior Fellow International Center June

2 Key to Effective Instruction Is Alignment Organizational Leadership Instructional Leadership Teaching

3 Organizational Leadership Instructional Leadership Student Achievement

4 What will our students need to: Know Do 4

5 PISA Shanghai-China556 2 Korea539 3 Finland536 4 Hong Kong-China533 5 Singapore526 6 Canada524 7 New Zealand521 8 Japan520 9 Australia Netherlands United States Germany Ireland France United Kingdom Spain Russian Federation Mexico Brazil Indonesia402 Overall Reading Scale Significantly Above OECD Average Not Significantly Different (OECD Average 493) Significantly below OECD Average

6 PISA 2009 Overall Math Scale Significantly Above OECD Average Not Significantly Different (OECD Average 496) Significantly below OECD Average 1 Shanghai-China600 2 Singapore562 3 Hong Kong-China555 4 Korea546 6 Finland541 9 Japan Canada Netherlands New Zealand Australia Germany France United Kingdom United States Ireland Spain Russian Federation Mexico Brazil Indonesia371

7 PISA 2009 Overall Science Scale Significantly Above OECD Average Not Significantly Different (OECD Average 501) Significantly below OECD Average 1 Shanghai-China575 2 Finland554 3 Hong Kong-China549 4 Singapore542 5 Japan539 6 Korea538 7 New Zealand532 8 Canada Australia Netherlands Germany United Kingdom Ireland United States France Spain Russian Federation Mexico Brazil Indonesia383

8 Reading Risk Mapping State Proficiency Standards onto NAEP Scales, IES August 2011 NC

9 Proficiency Grade 4 Reading 2009 Proficiency Grade 4 Reading 2009 Proficient Required NAEP Score North Carolina 69 %204 Massachusetts 54 %234 Missouri 47 %229 New Hampshire 74%211 Oregon 84 %177 Washington 73 %205 Vermont 70%214

10 Reading Risk Mapping State Proficiency Standards onto NAEP Scales, IES August 2011 NC

11 Proficiency Grade 8 Reading 2009 Proficiency Grade 8 Reading 2009 Proficient Required NAEP Score North Carolina 66%246 Minnesota 67%259 Missouri 50%267 Vermont 69%259 Oregon 69%250 Washington 68%253

12 Math Risk Mapping State Proficiency Standards onto NAEP Scales, IES August 2011 NC

13 Proficiency Grade 4 Mathematics 2009 Proficiency Grade 4 Mathematics 2009 Proficient Required NAEP Score North Carolina 81 %220 Massachusetts 48 %255 Hawaii 50 %239 New Hampshire 73 %237 New Mexico 77 %224 Washington 52 %243 Missouri 45 %246

14 Math Risk Mapping State Proficiency Standards onto NAEP Scales, IES August 2011 NC

15 Proficiency Grade 8 Mathematics 2009 Proficiency Grade 8 Mathematics 2009 Proficient Required NAEP Score North Carolina 80 %253 Massachusetts 49 %300 Missouri 47 %287 Hawaii 39 % 286 Minnesota 58 %287 Oregon 71 %266 Washington 51 %288

16 Elbow partner What are your risks? How will you prepare your school for a potential dip in scores? Do you have a communication strategy and a clear vision for the future? 16

17 Organizational Leadership Student Achievement

18 Culture Organizational Leadership

19 Levin and Elmore Everyone needs to collaborate to ensure that daily teaching and learning practices are the focus of the school All responsible for success Principals and teachers are fundamentally evaluators Leaders responsible for cultural changes – by displacing specific norms, structures, and processes by others

20 How will you create a culture in your schools of ALL students college and career ready? 20

21 Rigor and Relevance Teaching

22 Rigor/Relevance For All Students 22 AB DC

23 1.Awareness 2.Comprehension 3.Application 4.Analysis 5.Synthesis 6.Evaluation Knowledge Taxonomy Knowledge Taxonomy 23

24 Application Model 1. Knowledge in one discipline 2. Application within one discipline 3. Application across disciplines 4. Application to real-world predictable situations 5. Application to real-world unpredictable situations 24

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26 Curriculum-Instruction-Assessment Connections

27 Observation Interpretation Cognition Assessment Triangle Evidence-Based Design Framework

28 Models of Cognition Describe how students acquire knowledge and develop competence in a particular area Reflect recent and credible scientific evidence of typical learning processes and informed experiences of expert teachers Describe typical learning progression toward competence, including milestones (benchmarks)

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32 Observation Models A set of specifications for assessment tasks that will elicit illuminating responses from students The tasks or situations are linked to the cognitive model of learning and should prompt students to say, do, or create something that provides evidence to support inferences about students knowledge, skills, and cognitive processes

33 Interpretation Interpretations use the evidence from observations to make claims about what students understand and can do Claims – Frame a manageable number of learning goals around which instruction can be organized – Guide the specification of appropriate evidence – Provides a basis for meaningful reporting to different interested audiences

34 An Overview of SBACs Approach Content Specifications … –Create a bridge between standards and assessment and, ultimately, instruction –Organize the standards around major constructs & big ideas –Express what students should learn and be able to do

35 Each claim is described for assessment Rationale for each claim – Why is this learning goal important for College & Career Readiness (CCR)? – What does the research say about learning in this area? What does sufficient evidence look like? – What types of items/tasks? – What content/texts will be emphasized? What are some suggested reporting categories?

36 Summative Assessment Targets Indicate proposed prioritized content for the summative assessment- link CCSS to the kinds of items/tasks students will respond to Show how one or more (or parts) CCSS addresses the target – bundles CCSS (examples on next slide) – Standards or parts of standards that relate to same type of understanding & comparable rigor/DOK demands – Several similar CCSS from different strands

37 Assessment Claims for English Language Arts/Literacy Students can read closely and analytically to comprehend a range of increasingly complex literary and informational texts. Reading Students can produce effective and well- grounded writing for a range of purposes and audiences. Writing Students can employ effective speaking and listening skills for a range of purposes and audiences. Speaking/Listening Students can engage in research and inquiry to investigate topics, and to analyze, integrate, and present information. Research/Inquiry (a/o Round 2 – released 9/20/11)

38 Draft Overall Assessment Claims for English Language Arts/Literacy OVERALL 3-8 OVERALL 9-12 (a/o Round 2 – released 9/20/11) Students can demonstrate progress toward college and career readiness in English language arts and literacy. Students can demonstrate college and career readiness in English language arts and literacy.

39 English Language Arts and Literacy Standards Roadmap READING WRITING SPEAKING & LISTENING LANGUAGE 10 Anchor Standards for College and Career Readiness 10 Anchor Standards for College and Career Readiness 6 Anchor Standards for CCR ELA Standards K-12 Literacy Standards 6-12 ELA Standards K-12 Literacy Standards 6-12 Literary Text Hist. / S.S. Sci. / Tech Subj. Inform Text 1 K K K K K Found- ational Skills K

40 40 English Language Arts and Literary Shifts engageny

41 Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium

42 The Assessment Challenge How do we get from here......to here? All students leave high school college and career ready Common Core State Standards specify K-12 expectations for college and career readiness...and what can an assessment system do to help?

43 Next Generation Assessments More rigorous tests measuring student progress toward college and career readiness Have common, comparable scores across member states, and across consortia Provide achievement and growth information to help make better educational decisions and professional development opportunities Assess all students, except those with significant cognitive disabilities Administer online, with timely results Use multiple measures Source: Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 68 / Friday, April 9, 2010 pp

44 Smarter Balanced Background

45 A National Consortium of States 28 states representing 44% of K-12 students 21 governing, 7 advisory states Washington state is fiscal agent

46 Smarter Balanced Approach

47 Seven Key Principles 1.An integrated system 2.Evidence-based approach 3.Teacher involvement 4.State-led with transparent governance 5.Focus: improving teaching and learning 6.Actionable information – multiple measures 7.Established professional standards

48 A Balanced Assessment System Common Core State Standards specify K-12 expectations for college and career readiness Common Core State Standards specify K-12 expectations for college and career readiness All students leave high school college and career ready Teachers and schools have information and tools they need to improve teaching and learning Interim assessments Flexible, open, used for actionable feedback Summative assessments Benchmarked to college and career readiness Teacher resources for formative assessment practices to improve instruction

49 A Balanced Assessment System School Year Last 12 weeks of the year* DIGITAL CLEARINGHOUSE of formative tools, processes and exemplars; released items and tasks; model curriculum units; educator training; professional development tools and resources; scorer training modules; and teacher collaboration tools. English Language Arts and Mathematics, Grades 3-8 and High School Computer Adaptive Assessment and Performance Tasks Computer Adaptive Assessment and Performance Tasks Scope, sequence, number and timing of interim assessments locally determined *Time windows may be adjusted based on results from the research agenda and final implementation decisions. Summative Performance Tasks For Accountability Reading Writing Math Re-take option Summative End Of Year Adaptive Assessment for Accountability Optional Interim Assessment Optional Interim Assessment

50 Using Computer Adaptive Technology for Summative and Interim Assessments Turnaround in weeks compared to months today Faster results Fewer questions compared to fixed form tests Shorter test length Provides accurate measurements of student growth over time Increased precision Item difficulty based on student responses Tailored to student ability Larger item banks mean that not all students receive the same questions Greater security GMAT, GRE, COMPASS (ACT), Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) Mature technology

51 Technology IT readiness survey: Available January 2012 System architecture: Available January 2012 Vendors start building the system: February 2012 Vendors start building the system: February 2012 Improve the technology throughout pilot and field test: 2012 and 2013

52 Technology New Purchases (as of April 2012) – Hardware – 1GHz processor, 1 GB RAM, 9.5 inch screen size (10 inch class), screen resolution of 1024 x 768 Must have tools to temporarily disable features ( i.e.. web browser, Bluetooth connections, application switching) – Operating Systems – Windows 7, Mac 10.7, Linux (Ubuntu 11.10, Fedora 16), Chrome, iOS, Android 4.0 Will consider older versions and Linux after survey data and cognitive labs – Network – Must be able to connect to the Internet

53 Technology New Purchases (as of April 2012) – Form Factors –Desktops, laptops, netbooks, thin- client, and tablets ) iPad, Windows and Android) that meet the above specifications – Additional Accessories – Headphones may be required for audio support Physical keyboards (as opposed to virtual) and/or mice may be required for use with tablets

54 Technology Anticipate by up to 25% of the mathematics assessment will comprise items/tasks requiring student-produced illustrations or calculations. Students will need access to tablet (or other device) that employs a stylus for user input Future required use will be described in the August 2012 guidelines

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56 Technology Plan What is your vision? Designing an infrastructure – CoSN, SETDA, Horizon report, Maine Learning Technology Initiative Define the type of learning you want for your students. Professional Development – Teachers, Principals, Technology Coordinators

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58 2012 Horizon Time to Adoption One Year or Less: –Mobiles and Apps –Tablet Computing 58

59 2012 Horizon Time to Adoption Two to Three Years: –Game-Based Learning –Personal Learning Environments Horizon Report

60 Personal Learning Environments Horizon Report 2012

61 2012 Horizon Time to Adoption Four to Five Years: –Augmented Reality –Natural User Interfaces 61 Horizon Report 2012

62 Key Trends (Horizon Report 2012) Abundance of resources Cost of technology dropping, More common for students to bring their own device Schools including online learning, hybrid learning and collaborative models 62

63 Key Trends (Horizon Report 2012) One to one computing spreading across the world and US People expect to work, learn, and study whenever Technology profoundly affects the way we work, collaborate, communicate and succeed New emphasis on challenged-based and active learning 63

64 Challenges (Horizon Report 2012) Demand for personal learning is not supported by current technology Lack of digital media literacy for teachers Economic pressures – new models of education – unprecedented competition Institutional barriers Blending of formal and informal learning 64

65 Challenges (Horizon Report 2012) Learning that incorporates real life learning – is undervalued Many activities related to learning take place outside the walls of classrooms Putting 21 st century technology into 19 th century schools is a major undertaking We dont use digital media for formative assessment 65

66 What is on your Horizon? Download the NMC 2012 Horizon Report 66

67 Assessment System Components Summative Assessment (Computer Adaptive) Assesses the full range of Common Core in English language arts and mathematics for students in grades 3–8 and 11 (interim assessments can be used in grades 9 and 10) Measures current student achievement and growth across time, showing progress toward college and career readiness Can be given once or twice a year (mandatory testing window within the last 12 weeks of the instructional year) Includes a variety of question types: selected response, short constructed response, extended constructed response, technology enhanced, and performance tasks

68 Assessment System Components Interim Assessment (Computer Adaptive) Optional comprehensive and content-cluster assessment to help identify specific needs of each student Can be administered throughout the year Provides clear examples of expected performance on Common Core standards Includes a variety of question types: selected response, short constructed response, extended constructed response, technology enhanced, and performance tasks Aligned to and reported on the same scale as the summative assessments Fully accessible for instruction and professional development

69 Assessment System Components Extended projects demonstrate real- world writing and analytical skills May include online research, group projects, presentations Require 1-2 class periods to complete Included in both interim and summative assessments Applicable in all grades being assessed Evaluated by teachers using consistent scoring rubrics The use of performance measures has been found to increase the intellectual challenge in classrooms and to support higher-quality teaching. - Linda Darling-Hammond and Frank Adamson, Stanford University Performance Tasks

70 Performance Task Guidelines Integrate knowledge and skills across multiple standards or strands Measure capacities such as depth of understanding, research skills, complex analysis, and identification/providing of relevant evidence Require student-initiated planning, management of information and ideas, interaction with other materials 70

71 Performance Task Guidelines Require production of more extended responses (e.g., oral presentations, exhibitions, product development, in addition to more extended written responses which might be revised and edited Reflect a real-world task and/or scenario-based Allow for multiple approaches Represent content that is relevant and meaningful to students 71

72 Performance Task Guidelines Allow for multiple points of view and interpretations Require scoring that focuses on the essence of the task Be feasible for the school/classroom environment 72

73 Performance Task Guidelines Allow for demonstration of important knowledge & skills, including those that address 21st century skills such as critically analyzing, synthesizing media texts 73

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80 Grade 08 ELA Sample CR Item Assessment Target- 11. REASONING & EVALUATION: Apply reasoning and a range of textual evidence to justify inferences or interpret authors presentation of information (authors line of reasoning; point of view/purpose; relevance of evidence and/or elaboration to support claims, concepts, ideas) Standards: RI-6, RI-8, RST 6 DOK - 3

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85 Item Prompt Based on the text, what inference can be made about how tests and testing should occur to ensure an accurate measurement of overall water quality? Explain your inference using details from the text.

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100 Questions to be answered in the speech In two sentences, use your own words to tell what a wonder is and explain how a person who helps others can be considered a wonder. Write 2 or 3 sentences identifying a personal quality that both Mickey and Ana display. Give an example from both the video and the interview to support your answer.

101 Questions to be answered in the speech Tell which website you think would be most useful for learning about another young person that is a wonder because he or she helps others. Cite the web site by giving the web address. Use details from the website to support your answer.

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103 Performance Tasks Sources (2 articles, 3 videos) Article 1 Metro Daily News June, 2011 The Rise of the Robot Pet by Elena Soto Video 1: Fugitsus cute teddy-bear robot shows what it can do, May This is an introduction to the Fujitsu robot teddy bear. (1:58) Video 2: Pleo: Robot, pet or both? December The host of a technology show provides an introduction to a specific robot pet. (3:10) Article 2 Technology Trends Quarterly Fall, 2010 Love In the Time of Robots by Frank Mullin Video 3: Mayas Human Interaction – Sensors (A Genibo-QD film), February The Genibo robot dog displays some of its capabilities. (1:49)

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107 Scoring 1. Establishing a claim 2. Presentation of relevant evidence 3. Organization 4. Conventions 5. Language, tone, purpose, audience 6. Content

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110 Draft Assessment Claims for Mathematics Students can explain and apply mathematical concepts and interpret and carry out mathematical procedures with precision and fluency. Concepts and Procedures Students can solve a range of complex well-posed problems in pure and applied mathematics, making productive use of knowledge and problem solving strategies. Problem Solving Students can clearly and precisely construct viable arguments to support their own reasoning and to critique the reasoning of others. Communicating Reasoning Students can analyze complex, real-world scenarios and can construct and use mathematical models to interpret and solve problems. Modeling and Data Analysis (a/o Round 2 – released 12/9/11)

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114 A Schematic representation of CCSSM content

115 Hurdles Race

116 Think of the Content involved Interpreting distance-time graphs in a real-world context Realizing to the left is faster Understanding points of intersection in that context (theyre tied at the moment) Interpreting the horizontal line segment Putting all this together in an explanation

117 Think of the Practices involved Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. Reason abstractly and quantitatively. Construct viable arguments… Model with mathematics. Use appropriate tools strategically. Attend to Precision. Look for and make use of structure. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.

118 Item Exemplars: Technology Enhanced and Constructed Response

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144 Few initiatives are backed by evidence that they raise achievement. Formative assessment is one of the few approaches proven to make a difference. - Stephanie Hirsh, Learning Forward Assessment System Components Formative Assessment Practices Research-based, on-demand tools and resources for teachers Aligned to Common Core, focused on increasing student learning and enabling differentiation of instruction Professional development materials include model units of instruction and publicly released assessment items, formative strategies

145 145 Definition: Assessment that takes place continuously during the course of teaching and learning to provide teachers and students with feedback to close the gap between current learning and desired goals. Assessment Reform Group, 2002; Bell & Cowie, 2001; Black et al., 2003; Black & Wiliam, 1998; OECD, 2005; Sadler, 1989; Shepard, 2000)

146 Advantages of Formative Assessment Students learn faster Teachers know what students already know & adjust instruction Students aware of progress Most powerful moderator in student achievement Works for at risk students

147 Formative Assessment Strategies ( Black, Wiliam,1998; Sadler, 1998; Stiggins, 2007;Heritage, 2007) Pre-assessing students Sharing Learning goals with students Co-creating classroom discourse & questioning Rich & challenging tasks elicit student response Identifying gaps

148 Formative Assessment Strategies (Black, Wiliam,1998; Sadler, 1998; Stiggins, 2007;Heritage, 2007) Providing feedback/how to improve Self-assessments Peer- assessments Opportunities to close the gap Celebrations

149 Feedback

150 Strategies Traffic Light feedback Gallery Walk Portfolio Concept Map Ticket out the door

151 What do students say Class discussion Debate Oral presentation story/event telling Agree/disagree Choral reading Think-Pair-Share Youre the Judge Ask a question Make a Statement Radio Show Small group talk Play/drama Reciting a poem/speech Panel discussion Music Interviews Think aloud Answer specific Podcasts Read aloud Other____

152 Take a Three Minute Pulse After discussion, reading, lecture Reflect, discuss what they learned using higher order thinking skills Suggested questions: (Marzano) – How does this information relate to you? – How does what weve just learned relate to.. – How is what we just learned similar or different to – Identify one thing you knew and one thing that was new to you…

153 Exit Sheet

154 One Minute Response

155 Grades Supported GradesSummativeInterim (Optional) Formative Tools and Professional Learning (Optional) 1-2 Performance Tasks as Required to Cover CCSS EOC and Comprehensive EOC and Comprehensive Optional EOC and Comprehensive

156 Data are only useful if people are able to access, understand and use them… For information to be useful, it must be timely, readily available, and easy to understand. -Data Quality Campaign Assessment System Components Online Reporting Static and dynamic reports, secure and public views Individual states retain jurisdiction over access and appearance of online reports Dashboard gives parents, students, practitioners, and policymakers access to assessment information Graphical display of learning progression status (interim assessment) Feedback and evaluation mechanism provides surveys, open feedback, and vetting of materials

157 Support for Special Populations Accurate measures of progress for students with disabilities and English Language Learners Accessibility and Accommodations Work Group engaged throughout development Outreach and collaboration with relevant associations Common- Core Tests to Have Built-in Accommodations - June 8, 2011

158 Timeline Formative Processes, Tools, and Practices Development Begins Writing and Review of Pilot Items/Tasks (including Cognitive Labs and Small-Scale Trials) Field Testing of Summative and Interim Items/Tasks Conducted Content and Item Specifications Development Pilot Testing of Summative and Interim Items/Tasks Conducted Preliminary Achievement Standards (Summative) Proposed and Other Policy Definitions Adopted Operational Summative Assessment Administered Procurement Plan Developed Writing and Review of Field Test Items/Tasks (throughout the school year) Writing and Review of Field Test Items/Tasks (throughout the school year) Final Achievement Standards (Summative) Verified and Adopted Common Core State Standards Adopted by All Member States Summative Master Work Plan Developed and Work Groups Launched

159 Find Out More The Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium can be found online at


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