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How Peer Coaching Helps Teachers Implement GATE Strategies and the SCGM Susan Winebrenner, M.S. www.susanwinebrenner.com ITAG Conference 2013 760.510.0066.

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Presentation on theme: "How Peer Coaching Helps Teachers Implement GATE Strategies and the SCGM Susan Winebrenner, M.S. www.susanwinebrenner.com ITAG Conference 2013 760.510.0066."— Presentation transcript:

1 How Peer Coaching Helps Teachers Implement GATE Strategies and the SCGM Susan Winebrenner, M.S. www.susanwinebrenner.com ITAG Conference 2013 760.510.0066

2 Peer Coaching: Ensures long term implementation of strategies learned from PD events Allows teachers to utilize each others expertise to solve problems or challenges Can give teachers the confidence to volunteer for gifted cluster classes Fits in perfectly with PLC agendas

3 What does the research show? If your school wants teachers to implement and continue to use methods they have learned in professional development experiences, create an on-going collegial peer coaching program at your building. Peers helping peers learn about and implement new methods are much more effective than speakers or full-time mentors. The peer partners can be at the same level of expertise and can still help each other toward ongoing implementation. They can be at different grade levels or on different teams, but the method is still highly effective. This study has been ongoing for more than 25 years and continues to demonstrate the same amazing results.

4 Showers and Joyce, ASCD 2002: Effects of Peer Coaching on Student Achievement (slight variation in different study years) TYPE OF PDONE WEEK LATER ONE MONTH LATER THREE MONTHS LATER Lecture Only 10% 8% 3% Lecture with demonstrations 30%20% 3% Lecture with audience participation and practice 65%60% 5% Lecture with audience practice and on- site collegial peer coaching 90+ % GUESS!!!

5 Carol Dwecks Research Mindset by Carol Dweck, Random House, 2006. Explains the differences between people who welcome challenges and those who avoid them. How Not to Talk to Your Kids by Po Bronson. Free at www.nymag.com.www.nymag.com Explains how adults words and actions influence how the degree to which children learn to welcome challenging opportunities throughout their lives. Summarizes Dwecks work as well.

6 Easy success makes kids adopt lower standards and self- expectations and try to guarantee that all appears effortless. When adults praise outcomes that were created by little or no effort, verbally, with high grades, or awards, children continue to seek that praise instead of taking risks by being willing to work hard. Giving kids the smart label may actually be contributing to their underachievement; if not presently, then later in life. Teaching them the value of hard work supports lifetime achievement All students should make at least one years academic growth for every year they spend in school. Easy success = underestimation of ones own abilities

7 Leading a Book Study Group Volunteers only – teachers may come in and go out as they please Meet at least monthly – take turns providing food and chocolate Use the Book Study Leaders Guide from Multimedia package Concentrate on one strategy with one subject area at a time Add other strategies only when teachers indicate they are read- even then teachers can choose which to work on

8 Study Group Meeting Format SHARE feedback from members regarding their use of strategies included in previous meetings. Encourage group members to solve each others challenges. STUDY the new topic to be introduced at this meeting. Examine available Extension Menus. WATCH any videos that document classroom demonstrations of the target strategies

9 Whats next? Collegial Peer Coaching should either accompany or follow Book Study Groups to ensure ongoing implementation of learned strategies.

10 Format - continued DISCUSS the targeted strategy. Show group where supporting material may be found. CONNECT the content from the meeting to application to required standards. Allow time for teachers to meet in grade level or subject specialty groups during this meeting to coach each other to implementation. From the Professional Development Multimedia Package that supportsTeaching Gifted Kids in Todays Classroom, 3 rd edition, 2012, freespirit.com. Used with permission

11 Stages of Collegial Peer Coaching(CPC) Stage One: Partners meet to decide what will be observed and design the observation tool Observation is confined to the effects of the lesson ON STUDENTS Visitor LEAVES completed observation tool in demonstrating teachers classroom Partners trade roles and do a second observation There is no formal post observation discussion

12 Stages of Peer Coaching - CPC Stage Two: Same as Stage One except a post observation discussion may be scheduled at the invitation of the teacher being observed. Purpose of meeting is to discuss the data observed There are no judgments or advice asked for or given

13 Stages of Peer Coaching-CPC Stage Three: Same as Stage Two except the person being observed may ask for one suggestion for improvement the next time the same lesson or technique is used

14 Compatibility of peer coaching with other programs Complements RTI and gives teachers tools for the top part of the RTI triangle. Gives structure and ownership to PLC groups Enhances efforts to create consistency between teachers to deliver programs with fidelity Ends the typical isolation of teachers

15 Peer Coaching and Cluster Grouping – A Perfect Duo The Schoolwide Cluster Grouping Model (SCGM) A much needed paradigm shift in the delivery of gifted education services in times of lean budgets and with the outcomes of improved services for all categories of gifted students including: Twice Exceptional Primary age Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Underachievers and Non-productive students Students who go under cover to fit in The Cluster Grouping Handbook. freespirit.com

16 SCGM Suggested classroom composition 30students in 3 classes GiftedHigh Average AverageLow Average Far Below Average A6012 0 B06 66 C06 66 From The Cluster Grouping Handbook, freespirit.com. For classroom placement variations, see the article on Cluster Grouping by Dina Brulles and Susan Winebrenner in Gifted Child Today, Fall, 2011

17 What are some advantages of cluster grouping? Grouping all gifted children into cluster classes provides social, emotional, and academic advantages to students. Teachers can focus instruction because they have a slightly narrower range of achievement levels in their classes. Achievement rises at grade levels that use clustering. Schools provide full-time gifted services with little additional costs. Parents keep their gifted children in their home schools.

18 What are potential challenges of cluster grouping? Parental pressure to place children who have not been identified as gifted into the gifted cluster classroom Placing students when enrolling during the school year Challenging highly gifted students in more mixed-ability classes. Monitoring that consistent compacting and differentiation is taking place in gifted cluster classes.

19 The SCGM: Achievement Implications Narrowed range of abilities allows for more focused instruction Teachers learn strategies for advanced ability learners they can use for all students, not just the gifted students On-going assessment of students strengths and needs ensures continual progress Gifted students are more likely to receive advanced instruction and extended learning opportunities Not all student are working on the same material at the same time Higher expectations for all students! BONUS: Parents of gifted children allow their children to continue to attend their home school. *This requires first creating a gifted student data base.

20 Case Study Glendale, AZ 2000 - 2006 Gifted Identification Contact Dr Dina Brulles - dbrulles@gmail.com

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22 Glendale, AZ Numbers of gifted population depicted by ethnic representation of White and Hispanic gifted student populations between 2000-2006

23 SCGM Research Results Glendale AZ 2009 NonELL in NG Cluster 286 57 78

24 SCGM Research Results (2)

25 SCGM Totals (3) Student Type NumberPre-testPost-test% of Change African American 32 64.0686.0634.34 Hispanic 300 61.98 84.02 35.56 Caucasian 173 63.94 85.15 33.17 Asian 40 69.30 87.48 26.23 Native American 9 56,78 86.56 52.45 ELL 250 63.02 84.38 33.89 Non-ELL 304 63.26 85.12 34.56 Female 270 63.79 84.99 33.23 Male 284 62.5584.59 35.24

26 Administrators Perspective Is there evidence of: Yearly academic growth? Pre-testing? Flexible grouping? Compacting curriculum? Differentiated learning? Student directed learning? Small & large group instruction? Using Data and the Administrator Observation Form

27 ADMINISTRATOR OBSERVATION FORM

28 Topics for PLC or Book Study Meetings Characteristics of gifted learners Nomination & ID procedures Compacting and Differentiation strategies Flexible grouping strategies Creating tiered assignments Curriculum compacting and Differentiation Independent Study Cluster Grouping benefits and challenges Communication with Parents Add your own

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30 Achievement implications of The SCGM: Narrowed range of abilities allows for more focused instruction On-going assessment of students strengths and need ensures continual progress Teachers learn strategies for advanced ability learners they can use for all students, not just the gifted students Gifted ELL students are more likely to receive advanced instruction and extended learning opportunities Higher expectations for all students

31 What are potential challenges of cluster grouping? Parental pressure to place children who have not been identified as gifted into the gifted cluster classroom Placing students when enrolling during the school year Challenging highly gifted students in more mixed-ability classes. Monitoring that consistent compacting and differentiation is taking place in gifted cluster classes.

32 In summary… For student and teacher accountability, fidelity to adopted program goals and expected outcomes is essential. This includes training for teachers on how to consistently compact and differentiate the adopted curriculum for both learners who struggle and learners who are advanced. These outcomes are much more likely to occur when Collegial Peer Coaching is included in PD programs

33 Stages of Peer Coaching Stage One: Partners meet to decide what will be observed and design the observation tool Observation is confined to the effects of the lesson ON STUDENTS Visitor LEAVES completed observation tool in demonstrating teachers classroom Partners trade roles and do a second observation There is no formal post observation discussion

34 Stages of Peer Coaching Stage Two: Same as Stage One except a post observation discussion may be scheduled at the invitation of the teacher being observed. Purpose of meeting is to discuss the data observed There are no judgments or advice asked for or given

35 Stages of Peer Coaching Stage Three: Same as Stage Two except the person being observed may ask for one suggestion for improvement the next time the same lesson or technique is used


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