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Effective State Leadership for Career & Technical Education Dr. John Barge, Georgia State Superintendent Dr. Bill Daggett, Founder and Chairman, ICLE November.

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Presentation on theme: "Effective State Leadership for Career & Technical Education Dr. John Barge, Georgia State Superintendent Dr. Bill Daggett, Founder and Chairman, ICLE November."— Presentation transcript:

1 Effective State Leadership for Career & Technical Education Dr. John Barge, Georgia State Superintendent Dr. Bill Daggett, Founder and Chairman, ICLE November 30, 2012

2 Enter 2 or 4 Year Degree Program Without Remediation College Ready

3 What Is It? Career Ready

4 Text Lexile Measure (L) High School Literature College Literature High School Textbooks College Textbooks Military Personal Use Entry-Level Occupations SAT 1, ACT, AP* * Source of National Test Data: MetaMetrics Reading Study Summary Interquartile Ranges Shown (25% - 75%)

5 Career Ready Fewer Higher

6 1. Knowledge in one discipline 2. Application within discipline 3. Application across disciplines 4. Application to real-world predictable situations 5. Application to real-world unpredictable situations Career Ready

7 70%

8 Eligible for the Military Lack High School Diploma Can Not Pass Basic Literacy Test Obesity Drugs Prison

9 70% -Is Increasing at 1% Per Year-

10 70% Most are also unemployable

11 70% Are headed to public assistance

12 Dr. John D. Barge, State School Superintendent Making Education Work for All Georgians The Power of Career Pathways for Students Dr. John Barge Georgia State School Superintendent November 30, 2012

13 Dr. John D. Barge, State School Superintendent Making Education Work for All Georgians Georgias Career Clusters/Pathways

14 Dr. John D. Barge, State School Superintendent Making Education Work for All Georgians Georgias Career Clusters/Pathways There is a codependence of economic development and education to close the skills gap. Georgia has had six straight years of an unemployment rate higher than the national average while, at the same time, we have 5,000 vacant IT jobs in metro Atlanta alone.

15 Dr. John D. Barge, State School Superintendent Making Education Work for All Georgians The Need for Relevance In America, roughly one million students leave high school without a diploma. Many drop out because they struggle academically. But large numbers say they dropped out because they felt their classes were not interesting, and that high school was unrelentingly boring. In other words, they didnt believe high school was relevant, or provided a pathway to achieving their dreams. Too many cant see a clear, transparent connection between their program of study and tangible opportunities in the labor market.

16 Dr. John D. Barge, State School Superintendent Making Education Work for All Georgians Career Pathways PATHWAYS TO PROSPERITY PROJECT – Harvard Graduate School of Education By concentrating too much on classroom-based academics with four-year college as a goal, the nations education system has failed vast numbers of students, who instead need solid preparation for careers requiring less than a bachelors degree. Leaders that developed the report argue for an education system that clearly articulates students career options as early as middle school and defines the coursework and training required, so young people can chart an informed course toward work, whether as an electrician or a college professor.

17 Dr. John D. Barge, State School Superintendent Making Education Work for All Georgians The Georgetown Center projects that 14 million job openings – nearly half of those that will be filled by workers with post-secondary education – will go to people with an associates degree or occupational certificate. Many of these will be in middle-skill occupations such as electrician, and construction manager, dental hygienist, paralegal and police officer. What Kind of Postsecondary Education is Necessary?

18 Dr. John D. Barge, State School Superintendent Making Education Work for All Georgians While these jobs may not be as prestigious as those filled by B.A. holders, they pay a significant premium over many jobs open to those with just a high school degree. More surprisingly, they pay more than many of the jobs held by those with a bachelors degree. What Kind of Postsecondary Education is Necessary?

19 Dr. John D. Barge, State School Superintendent Making Education Work for All Georgians In fact, 27 percent of people with post- secondary licenses or certificates – credentials short of an associates degree – earn more than the average bachelors degree recipient. What Kind of Postsecondary Education is Necessary?

20 Dr. John D. Barge, State School Superintendent Making Education Work for All Georgians Career Pathways Employers demand it and students beg for it: relevant, experiential learning based on an area of interest that prepares each student for the world of work, whether they choose to attend college or not. We will align our offerings with high-demand areas and reward graduates with skills needed for 21 st Century jobs. Result: A graduate ready for college or a career.

21 Dr. John D. Barge, State School Superintendent Making Education Work for All Georgians HB 186 Provides and expands career pathway options for high school students to ensure their college and career readiness.

22 Dr. John D. Barge, State School Superintendent Making Education Work for All Georgians Aspects of HB 186 Embedding the Common Core curriculum into CTAE Administering a soft skills assessment Assessing all 10 th or 11 th grade students with the Compass test Counseling all students appropriately

23 Dr. John D. Barge, State School Superintendent Making Education Work for All Georgians Moving Forward with HB 186 Development of the 17 Career Clusters Meetings with Career Cluster Advisory Committees, which are made up of business and industry leaders Developed a survey for business leaders to give us feedback

24 Achievement = All Indicators Progress = State Assessments - Student Growth Percentile Achievement Gap Closure = State Assessments – High Needs vs Non-high Needs Exceeding the Bar = Additional Points Added to Overall CCRPI Score Financial Efficiency = Operational No Points – Star Rating Only School Climate = Operational No Points – Star Rating Only

25 College and Career Ready Performance Index, High School, Grades DRAFT CONTENT MASTERY (END of COURSE TESTS in some areas to be REPLACED by COMMON CORE ASSESSMENTS in ) 1.Percent of students scoring at Meets or Exceeds on the Ninth Grade Literature End of Course Test (required participation rate 95%) 2.Percent of students scoring at Meets or Exceeds on the American Literature End of Course Test (required participation rate 95%) 3.Percent of students scoring at Meets or Exceeds on the Mathematics I/GPS Algebra (transitioning to CCGPS Coordinate Algebra) End of Course Test (required participation rate 95%) 4.Percent of students scoring at Meets or Exceeds on the Mathematics II/GPS Geometry (transitioning to CCGPS Analytic Geometry) End of Course Test (required participation rate 95%) 5.Percent of students scoring at Meets or Exceeds on the Physical Science End of Course Test (required participation rate 95%) 6.Percent of students scoring at Meets or Exceeds on the Biology End of Course Test (required participation rate 95%) 7.Percent of students scoring at Meets or Exceeds on the US History End of Course Test (required participation rate 95%) 8.Percent of students scoring at Meets or Exceeds on the Economics End of Course Test (required participation rate 95%) POST HIGH SCHOOL READINESS 9.Percent of graduates completing a CTAE focus, or an advanced academic focus, or a fine arts focus, or a world language focus within their program of study 10.Percent of CTAE Pathway Completers earning a national industry recognized credential, or a passing score on a GaDOE recognized end of pathway assessment (operational in ) 11.Percent of graduates: entering TCSG/USG not requiring remediation or learning support courses; or scoring at least 22 out of 36 on the composite ACT; or scoring at least 1550 out of 2400 on the combined SAT; or scoring 3 or higher on two or more AP exams ; or scoring 4 or higher on two or more IB exams 12.Percent of graduates earning high school credit(s) for accelerated enrollment via ACCEL, Dual HOPE Grant, Move On When Ready, Early College, Gateway to College, Advanced Placement courses, or International Baccalaureate courses 13.Percent of graduates earning 2 or more high school credits in the same world language (operational in ) 14.Percent of students scoring at Meets or Exceeds on the Georgia High School Writing Test 15.Percent of students achieving a Lexile measure greater than or equal to 1275 on the American Literature EOCT 16.Percent of EOCT assessments scoring at the Exceeds level 17.Student Attendance Rate (%) GRADUATION RATE Year Extended Cohort Graduation Rate (%)

26 Exceeding the Bar: a companion to the College and Career Ready Performance Index for High Schools In addition to the eighteen (18) items within the College and Career Ready Performance Index, high schools may earn additional points for these supplemental indicators. 1.Percent of graduates taking a nationally recognized college entrance examination 2.Percent of graduates earning credit in a physics course 3.Percent of first time 9 th grade students with disabilities earning 3 Carnegie Unit Credits in 3 core content areas (ELA, mathematics, science, social studies) 4.Percent of first time 9 th grade students earning 4 Carnegie Unit Credits in 4 core content areas (ELA, mathematics, science, social studies) 5.School has earned a Georgia Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) Program Certification 6.Percent of English Learners with positive movement from one Performance Band to a higher Performance Band based on the ACCESS for ELLs 7.*Percent of graduates completing a career-related Work-Based Learning Program or a career-related Capstone Project (moves to face of CCRPI in ) 8. Percent of students in International Baccalaureate High Schools (IB) completing IB Career-Related Certificates 9. School or LEA-defined innovative practice accompanied by documented data supporting improved student achievement To be considered at a later date for inclusion on the mandatory indicators or as an Exceeding the Bar indicator: *Percent of tested students scoring at a proficient level on a Soft Skills Assessment (moves to face of CCRPI in ) Schools average score on the Georgia Teacher Effectiveness Measurement Schools average score on the Georgia Leader Effectiveness Measurement DRAFT

27 College and Career Ready Performance Index, Middle School, Grades DRAFT CONTENT MASTERY (CRCT in some areas to be REPLACED by COMMON CORE ASSESSMENTS in ) 1.Percent of students scoring at Meets or Exceeds in ELA (required participation rate 95%) 2.Percent of students scoring at Meets or Exceeds in reading (required participation rate 95%) 3.Percent of students scoring at Meets or Exceeds in mathematics (required participation rate 95%) 4.Percent of students scoring at Meets or Exceeds in science (required participation rate 95%) 5.Percent of students scoring at Meets or Exceeds in social studies (required participation rate 95%) POST MIDDLE SCHOOL READINESS 6.Percent of English Learners with positive movement from one Performance Band to a higher Performance Band as measured by the ACCESS for ELLs 7.Percent of Students With Disabilities served in general education environments greater than 80% of the school day 8.Percent of students scoring at Meets or Exceeds on the Grade Eight Writing Assessment (required participation rate 95%) 9.Percent of students in grade 8 achieving a Lexile measure equal to or greater than Percent of students completing 2 or more state defined career related assessments/inventories by the end of grade 8 11.Percent of students with a complete state defined Individual Graduation Plan by the end of grade 8 12.Student Attendance Rate (%) PREDICTOR FOR HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION 13.Percent of students in grade eight passing at least four courses in core content areas (ELA, mathematics, science, social studies) 14.Percent of CRCT assessments scoring at the Exceeds level

28 Exceeding the Bar: a companion to the College and Career Ready Performance Index for Middle Schools In addition to the fourteen (14) items within the College and Career Ready Performance Index, middle schools may earn additional points for these supplemental indicators. 1.Percent of students in grades successfully completing above grade level core courses (ELA, mathematics, science, social studies) 2.Percent of students successfully earning three middle school course credits in the fine arts, or career exploratory, or world languages 3.Percent of students earning at least one high school credit by the end of grade 8 (ELA, mathematics, science, social studies, world languages, fine arts, CTAE) 4.School has earned a Georgia Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) Program Certification 5.Percent of students in grade 8 scoring proficient/advanced on the 21 st Century Skills Technology Assessment 6.Percent of students in grades with a fully documented Fitnessgram assessment 7.School or LEA-defined innovative practice accompanied by documented data supporting improved student achievement To be considered at a later date for inclusion on the mandatory indicators or as an Exceeding the Bar indicator: Schools average score on the Georgia Teacher Effectiveness Measurement Schools average score on the Georgia Leader Effectiveness Measurement DRAFT

29 College and Career Ready Performance Index, Elementary School, Grades K - 5 DRAFT Dr. John D. Barge, State School Superintendent Making Education Work for All of Georgias Students CONTENT MASTERY (CRCT in some areas to be REPLACED by COMMON CORE ASSESSMENTS in ) 1.Percent of students scoring at Meets or Exceeds in ELA (required participation rate 95%) 2.Percent of students scoring at Meets or Exceeds in reading (required participation rate 95%) 3.Percent of students scoring at Meets or Exceeds in mathematics (required participation rate 95%) 4.Percent of students scoring at Meets or Exceeds in science(required participation rate 95%) 5.Percent of students scoring at Meets or Exceeds in social studies (required participation rate 95%) POST ELEMENTARY SCHOOL READINESS 6.Percent of English Learners with positive movement from one Performance Band to a higher Performance Band as measured by the ACCESS for ELLs 7.Percent of Students With Disabilities served in general education environments greater than 80% of the school day 8.Percent of students scoring at Meets or Exceeds on the Grade Five Writing Assessment (required participation rate 95%) 9.Percent of students in grade 3 achieving a Lexile measure equal to or greater than Percent of students in grade 5 achieving a Lexile measure equal to or greater than Percent of students in grades 1-5 completing the identified number of grade specific career awareness lessons aligned to Georgias 17 Career Clusters (operational in ) 12.Student Attendance Rate (%) PREDICTOR FOR HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION 13.Percent of students in Grade 5 passing at least 4 courses in core content areas (ELA, mathematics, science, social studies) 14.Percent of CRCT assessments scoring at the Exceeds level

30 Exceeding the Bar: a companion to the College and Career Ready Performance Index for Elementary Schools In addition to the fourteen (14) items within the College and Career Ready Performance Index, elementary schools may earn additional points for these supplemental indicators. 1.Percent of students in grades K – 5 successfully completing above grade level core courses (ELA, reading, mathematics, science, social studies) 2.Percent of students successfully completing world language courses 3.Percent of students successfully completing fine arts courses 4.School has earned a Georgia Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) Program Certification 5.*Percent of fifth grade students with a complete career portfolio by end of grade 5 (moves to face of CCRPI in ) 6.Percent of students in grades 1-5 with a fully documented Fitnessgram assessment 7.School or LEA-defined innovative practice accompanied by documented data supporting improved student achievement To be considered at a later date for inclusion on the mandatory indicators or as an Exceeding the Bar indicator : Schools average score on the Georgia Teacher Effectiveness Measurement Schools average score on the Georgia Leader Effectiveness Measurement DRAFT

31 Dr. John D. Barge, State School Superintendent Making Education Work for All Georgians The Power of Career Pathways for Students Dr. John Barge Georgia State School Superintendent November 30, 2012

32 School Improvement Growing Gap Changing World

33 School Improvement Growing Gap Changing World

34 School Improvement Growing Gap Changing World

35 21 st Annual Model Schools Conference Effective and efficient practices for improving student achievement in times of decreasing resources and increasing expectations Focusing on instructional excellence as the key to the Common Core State Standards, Next Generation Assessments, and Teacher Evaluations Providing effective instructional approaches for special populations June 30 – July 3 | Washington, D.C.

36 23 Successful Practices WHAT Did They Do?

37 Intended to focus on College and Career Ready What Did They Do?

38 Intended to focus on College and Career Ready In fact focused on Career Ready What Did They Do?

39 Intended to focus on College and Career Ready In fact focused on Career Ready By so doing found students were also prepared for College Ready What Did They Do?

40 Career Ready Network

41 College and Career Ready What did they do differently

42 A focus on college AND career ready Successful Practices

43 A focus on college AND career ready A common vision Successful Practices

44 A focus on college AND career ready A common vision A culture of high expectations Successful Practices

45 A focus on college AND career ready A common vision A culture of high expectations Literacy across the curriculum Successful Practices

46 A focus on college AND career ready A common vision A culture of high expectations Literacy across the curriculum Rigor and Relevance for ALL students Successful Practices

47 A focus on college AND career ready A common vision A culture of high expectations Literacy across the curriculum Rigor and Relevance for ALL students A culture of continuous improvement Successful Practices

48 A focus on college AND career ready A common vision A culture of high expectations Literacy across the curriculum Rigor and Relevance for ALL students A culture of continuous improvement Leadership across all levels Successful Practices

49 A focus on college AND career ready A common vision A culture of high expectations Literacy across the curriculum Rigor and Relevance for ALL students A culture of continuous improvement Leadership across all levels Focused and sustained professional development Successful Practices

50 23 Successful Practices

51 Successful Practices Network -Barrier Study-

52 A focus on college AND career ready A culture of high expectations Literacy across the curriculum A culture of continuous improvement A common vision Leadership across all levels Focused and sustained professional development 23 Best Practices

53 Level of Establishment Firmly Established Partially Established In Planning Stage Not Evident Best Practices

54 Technical Cultural Political Insufficient Support Insufficient Budget Insufficient Personnel Barriers

55 Technical – Cultural – is greatest barrier in 18 of the 23 successful practices Political Insufficient Support Insufficient Budget Insufficient Personnel Barriers

56 Technical – is greatest in 4 of the 23 successful practices Cultural – is greatest barrier in 18 of the 23 successful practices Political Insufficient Support Insufficient Budget Insufficient Personnel Barriers

57 Technical – is greatest in 4 of 23 the successful practice Cultural – is greatest barrier in 18 of the 23 successful practices Political Insufficient Support Insufficient Budget – is greatest in 1 of the 23 successful practices Insufficient Personnel Barriers

58 School Improvement Growing Gap Changing World

59 No Formula

60

61

62 Rigor/Relevance Framework

63 Decision Making Innovation/Creativity Goal Setting/Results Driven Multi Tasking Work with others Quad D – Skills and Knowledge

64

65

66


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