Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Transcultural Mental Health in a Changing World: Building a Global Response World Federation for Mental Health Conference Minneapolis, MN 28-31 Oct 2007.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Transcultural Mental Health in a Changing World: Building a Global Response World Federation for Mental Health Conference Minneapolis, MN 28-31 Oct 2007."— Presentation transcript:

1 Transcultural Mental Health in a Changing World: Building a Global Response World Federation for Mental Health Conference Minneapolis, MN Oct 2007

2 Transcultural Mental Health in a Changing World: Building a Global Response The Role of Transcultural Mental Health in the Global Mental Health Movement Ronald Wintrob MD

3 Immigrants and Refugees: A Global Perspective Ronald Wintrob, MD Robert Kohn, MD Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior Brown University Providence, Rhode Island USA

4 Table 1. Number of Migrants in the World by Developed Regions; (in millions) Region Popln Number% % World More Developed Regions Less Developed Regions Source: Population Division, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, United Nations Secretariat; Trends in Total Migrant Stock: The 2005 Revision

5 Table 2. Number of Migrants in the World by Continents; (in millions) Region Population Number% % World Africa Asia Europe Latin America and Caribbean North America Oceania Source: Population Division, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, United Nations Secretariat; Trends in Total Migrant Stock: The 2005 Revision

6 Table 3. Net Outflow of Worlds Migrant Population; 2005 Mexico800,000 China380,000 India270,000 Iran250,000 Pakistan248,000 Indonesia200,000 Philippines180,000 Morocco110,000 Sudan106,000 Egypt105,000 Peru102,000

7 Table 4. Net Inflow of Worlds Migrant Population; 2005 USA1,300,000 Spain 570,000 Italy 225,000 Canada 208,000 Germany 200,000 UK 190,000 Russia 183,000 France 144,000 Australia 119,000

8 Table 5. Countries with Largest Percentage of Worlds Migrant Population; 2005 USA20.12 Russia 6.34 Germany 5.32 Ukraine 3.58 France 3.39 Saudi Arabia 3.34 Canada 3.20 India 2.99 UK 2.84 Spain 2.51 Australia 2.15

9 Table 6. Migrants as Percentage of National Population; 2005 Switzerland22.88 Australia20.33 Canada18.92 New Zealand15.94 Ireland14.11 USA12.86 Sweden12.36 Germany12.27 Spain11.12 France10.70 UK 9.60

10 Source: Population Division of the Department of Economic and Social Affairs of the United Nations Secretariat, Trends in Total Migrant Stock: The 2005 Revision Figure 1. Percentage of Migrants in the World by Continents; 2005

11 Table 7. Number of Refugees in the World by Developed Regions; (in millions) Region Migrant Population Number% % World More Developed Regions Less Developed Regions Source: Population Division, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, United Nations Secretariat; Trends in Total Migrant Stock: The 2005 Revision

12 Table 8. Number of Refugees in the World by Continents; (in millions) Region Migrant Population Number% % World Africa Asia Europe Latin America and Caribbean North America Oceania Source: Population Division, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, United Nations Secretariat; Trends in Total Migrant Stock: The 2005 Revision

13 Figure 2. Percentage of Refugees in the World by Continents; 2005 Source: Population Division, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, United Nations Secretariat; Trends in Total Migrant Stock: The 2005 Revision

14 Figure 3. Number of Migrants in the World by Developed Regions; (in thousands)

15 Figure 4. Number of Migrants in the World by Continents; (in thousands)

16 Figure 5. Migrants in the World as Percentage of Total Population, by Developed Regions;

17 Figure 6. Migrants in the World, as Percentage of Total Population, by Continents;

18 Figure 7. Refugees in the World as Percentage of Migrant Population, by Developed Regions;

19 Figure 8. Number of Refugees in the World by Continents; (in thousands)

20 Source: 2004 Global Refugee Trends, United Nations High Commission for Refugees, June 2005 Figure 9. Top 7 Countries of Refugee Resettlement; 2004

21 Source: Population Division of the Department of Economic and Social Affairs of the United Nations Secretariat, World Population Prospects: The 2004 Revision and World Urbanization Prospects: The 2003 Revision, Figure 10. Annual Net Number of Migrants by Continents; (in thousands)

22 Figure 11. Migration Flows by Reason, into Selected OECD Countries; 1999 Source: OECD, SOPEMI 2001: Trends in International Migration

23 Table 9. Money Sent Home by Migrants; 2005 in US$ (billions) India26.9 Mexico24.5 China22.5 Philippines14.9 France12.7 Spain 7.9 United Kingdom6.7 Germany6.5 Morocco5.5 Bangladesh 5.5 Pakistan5.4 Egypt5.2

24 Table 10. Foreign-Born Component of US Population; YearN (million)% US popln

25 Table 11. Inflow of Refugees and Asylum Seekers to the USA; (per 1,000)

26 Homeland Insecurity: the Changing Face of Immigration Brown University Public Affairs Conference April 2004 Immigration and Security: A Post-9/11 Report Card Domestic security, civil liberties, and national unity after 9/11 Doris Meissner: Senior fellow, Migration Policy Institute and former commissioner U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service War on Terror or War on Immigrants? Can US balance national security concerns with humane immigration policies? Mark Krikorian: Executive director of the Center for Immigration Studies Frank Sharry: Executive director of the National Immigration Forum Yearning to Breathe Free How are changes in U.S. immigration policy affecting the fate of refugees? Lavinia Limón: Executive director of Immigration and Refugee Services of America and the U.S. Committee for Refugees

27 Homeland Insecurity: the Changing Face of Immigration Current Attitudes Since the collapse of proposed changes in national immigration legislation in June 2007, anti-immigrant legislation has been passed in many states and municipalities Recent court decisions have declared such legislation unconstitutional intrusions on federal responsibilities Both Republican and Democratic parties emphasize strengthening border security and the arrest and extradition of illegal immigrants and their families

28 Homeland Insecurity: the Changing Face of Immigration Current Attitudes There is increasingly strong sentiment in states bordering Mexico for massive investment in border fencing, border patrols, strict law enforcement and vigorous punishment of illegal immigrants Volunteer vigilante groups are actively patrolling some areas along the Mexican border and their actions are tolerated or encouraged by the local population

29 Homeland Insecurity: the Changing Face of Immigration Current Attitudes I dont think there has been such a surge of xenophobia in our lifetime. We havent seen this kind of widespread and deep-seated anger [toward immigrants] for almost 100 years, since the last big wave of immigration in the early 20th century. Doris Meissner; former commissioner, US Immigration and Naturalization Service

30 Homeland Insecurity: the Changing Face of Immigration Current Attitudes The intense rhetoric generated by the debate to tighten immigration restrictions and punish illegal immigrants has fueled discrimination against Hispanic immigrants; toward those living in the US legally, as well as illegal residents from Mexico and other Latin American countries

31 Homeland Insecurity: the Changing Face of Immigration Current Attitudes Our country needs to have a working immigration policy, one that corresponds to economic realities and is based on good sense and fairness. But it doesnt. It has federal inertia and a rising immigrant tide, and a national mood of frustration and anxiety that is slipping, as it has so many times before, into hatred and fear. Hostility for illegal immigrants falls disproportionately on an entire population of people, documented or not, who speak Spanish and are working-class or poor. Editorial; New York Times, 22 Oct 2007

32

33 Immigrants and Refugees: A Global Perspective Ronald Wintrob, MD Robert Kohn, MD Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior Brown University Thank you


Download ppt "Transcultural Mental Health in a Changing World: Building a Global Response World Federation for Mental Health Conference Minneapolis, MN 28-31 Oct 2007."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google