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70. Supporting English Language Learners Systemwide and in the Classroom Norma Godina-Silva, Ph.D. (915) 496-5838 ICLE Consultant.

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Presentation on theme: "70. Supporting English Language Learners Systemwide and in the Classroom Norma Godina-Silva, Ph.D. (915) 496-5838 ICLE Consultant."— Presentation transcript:

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2 70. Supporting English Language Learners Systemwide and in the Classroom Norma Godina-Silva, Ph.D. godinasilva@yahoo.com (915) 496-5838 ICLE Consultant 21 th Annual Model Schools Conference Washington D.C. – Gaylord June 30-July 3, 2012 1

3 Whats in the Name? Terms used to refer to the same student population: English Language Learners (ELLs) English Learners (ELs) English-as-a-Second Language (ESL) Students English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Students 2 ©Norma Godina-Silva, Jan. 2013

4 Objectives Content Objective G ain knowledge and understanding of… The Rigor/Relevance Framework to close the achievement gap and ensure the academic and linguistic success of ELLs. The connection between R/R Framework, sheltered instruction, CCSS/STAAR, and the ELPS. Language Objective Engage in dialogue and write down reflective notes as next steps to an effective program of instruction for ELLs. 3

5 The Daggett System for Effective Instruction (DSEI) 1.Identify the component that best describes your current role and/or responsibilities. 2.How do you contribute to the overall success of ELL Student Achievement? 4

6 Focusing on Relationships 5

7 Good News... 6 Take a minute to think about something that has occurred in your life in the past few months that is wonderful. Create a headline for that event/occurrence. Be ready to share!

8 Relationships Know Your Students Know What They Know Know What They Dont Know Personal Experiences Previous Academic Background Culture and Community 7 ©Norma Godina-Silva, Jan. 2013

9 Rigor/Relevance Framework How can it support the linguistic and academic instruction of English Language Learners? 8

10 Resources to identify priorities, establish and implement policies, and build capacity for a more rigorous and relevant curriculum for ELLs. 9

11 Rigor/Relevance Framework for Cultural Responsive Systemic Education Reform (p.2) Linguistic, Cognitive, and Academic Rigor C Students learn academic English for standardized tests. Some instruction may be differentiated by language proficiency. High level literacy achievement is the goal, but meaningful linguistic and cultural (teaching for transfer) connections are lacking. D Students actively learn standards-based grade-level content. They reach high levels of literacy achievement through systematic differentiated instruction across language proficiency levels. Teaching for transfer is achieved through connections to students literacy in their native language and their prior knowledge. Cultural and linguistic diversity is celebrated within the school and community. A Students learn social language and basic communication. Content instruction tends to focus on low- level skills and is not differentiated with respect to language proficiency. Little attention is given to students linguistic and cultural backgrounds. B Students learn basic academic skills in isolation, possibly with bilingual support and culturally relevant connections. Some instruction is differentiated by language proficiency. Students are not fully accountable for grade-level curricula and high-level literacy achievement. Cultural Responsiveness and Relevance 10

12 Quadrant A Social language and basic communication Content focused on low-level skills No differentiation with respect to language proficiency Little attention to linguistic and cultural backgrounds.. 11

13 Quadrant B Skills in isolation, possibly with bilingual support and culturally relevant connections. Some instruction differentiated by language proficiency. Students are not fully accountable for grade-level curricula 12

14 Quadrant C Academic English for standardized tests. Some differentiation by language proficiency. Meaningful linguistic and cultural (teaching for transfer) connections still lacking. 13

15 Quadrant D Actively learn grade-level content. Reach high levels of literacy achievement Differentiated instruction Teaching for transfer through connections in native language and their prior knowledge. Cultural and linguistic diversity in school and community 14

16 ELL Instruction Must Have High Expectations Differentiated Instruction Across Language Proficiency Levels Connections to Prior Knowledge Building Academic Background Vocabulary Development Oral Language Development Opportunities Honoring and Celebrating Cultural and Linguistic Diversity 15 ©Norma Godina-Silva, Jan. 2013

17 Increasing Text Complexity Text Complexity Grade Band Previous Lexile Ranges Lexile Ranges Aligned to CCR K–1N/A 2–3450L–725L450L–790L 4–5645L–845L770L–980L 6–8860L–1010L955L–1155L 9–10960L–1115L1080L–1305L 11–College and Career Readiness 1070L–1220L1215L–1355L PG page 8 16

18 What is Sheltered Instruction? 17

19 What is Sheltered Instruction? Its a process for making grade-level content more accessible to ELLs while also promoting English language development. Combines second language acquisition strategies with content area instruction. 18 ©Norma Godina-Silva, Jan. 2013

20 Create an ELL Class List Create a class list for each of your class periods. 10 th Grade LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY ASSESSEMENT RESULTS Students Name Date of Entry in US Schools 2012 Rating 2013 Rating Progress Measure 2013-14 Goal Godina, N.2002Intermediate/ Emerging 1 level higher Advance / Developing 19 ©Norma Godina-Silva, Jan. 2013

21 Language Domains and Language Proficiency Levels Language Domains Listening Speaking Reading Writing Language Proficiency Levels Level 1 (Beginning/Entering) Level 2 (Intermediate/Emerging) Level 3 (Advanced/Developing) Level 4 (Advanced High/ Expanding) Level 5(Bridging) 20 ©Norma Godina-Silva, Jan. 2013

22 Team Activity Steps: Think about one of your ELLs. What was a challenge you faced in meeting his/her academic needs? Write the challenge on the index card. When cued, be ready to share with your elbow partner. 21 ©Norma Godina-Silva, Jan. 2013

23 Sample Mathematics Word Problem (Grade 7) What will students need to know to be able to solve this test question (Measurement)? Talk among yourselves. A DVD player is in the shape of a rectangular prism. It has a length of 17 inches, a width of 10.2 inches, and a height of 2 inches. What is the volume of the DVD player in cubic inches? Record your answer and fill in the bubbles on your answer document. Be sure to use the correct place value. 22 ©Norma Godina-Silva, Jan. 2013

24 Focusing on Language 23

25 BICS: Basic Interpersonal Communicative Skills CALP: Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency Understanding Language Proficiency in Social and Academic Settings BICS CALP 24 ©Norma Godina-Silva, Jan. 2013

26 Understanding CALP Cumminss Framework for Evaluating Language Demand in Content Activities I Cognitively Undemanding + Context-embedded II Cognitively Undemanding + Context-reduced III Cognitively Demanding + Context-embedded IV Cognitively Demanding + Context-reduced 25 25 BICS CALP ©Norma Godina-Silva, Jan. 2013

27 Understanding CALP: Cumminss Framework for Evaluating Language Demand in Content Activities I Cognitively Undemanding + Context-embedded Example: Engaging in face-to-face social conversation with friends. II Cognitively Undemanding + Context-reduced Example: Engaging in social conversation on the telephone. III Cognitively Demanding + Context-embedded Example: Solving math word problems using manipulatives and/or pictures. IV Cognitively Demanding + Context-reduced Example: Solving math word problems without manipulatives and/or pictures 26 26 BICS CALP ©Norma Godina-Silva, Jan. 2013

28 27 Compare/Contrast Quadrant I and Quadrant II What Changed? Talk to Your Partner/Team Whole Group Discussion I Cognitively Undemanding + Context-embedded Example: Engaging in face-to-face social conversation with friends. II Cognitively Undemanding + Context-reduced Example: Engaging in social conversation on the telephone. III Cognitively Demanding + Context-embedded Example: Solving math word problems using manipulatives and/or pictures IV Cognitively Demanding + Context-reduced Example: Solving math word problems without manipulatives and/or pictures ©Norma Godina-Silva, Jan. 2013

29 28 Compare/Contrast Quadrant III and Quadrant IV What changed? Talk to Your Partner/Team Whole Group Discussion I Cognitively Undemanding + Context-embedded Example: Engaging in face-to-face social conversation with friends. II Cognitively Undemanding + Context-reduced Example: Engaging in social conversation on the telephone. III Cognitively Demanding + Context-embedded Example: Solving math word problems using manipulatives and/or pictures IV Cognitively Demanding + Context-reduced Example: Solving math word problems without manipulatives and/or pictures ©Norma Godina-Silva, Jan. 2013

30 Quadrant I Quadrant? Selecting a movie from a picture menu at a Redbox. I Cognitively Undemanding + Context-embedded Example: Engaging in face-to-face social conversation with friends. II Cognitively Undemanding + Context-reduced Example: Engaging in social conversation on the telephone. III Cognitively Demanding + Context-embedded Example: Solving math word problems using manipulatives and/or pictures IV Cognitively Demanding + Context-reduced Example: Solving math word problems without manipulatives and/or pictures Cognitively Undemanding + Context Embedded Scenario/Activity 29 ©Norma Godina-Silva, Jan. 2013

31 Quadrant IV Quadrant? Answering history questions at the end of the chapter in the textbook. I Cognitively Undemanding + Context-embedded Example: Engaging in face-to-face social conversation with friends. II Cognitively Undemanding + Context-reduced Example: Engaging in social conversation on the telephone. III Cognitively Demanding + Context-embedded Example: Solving math word problems using manipulatives and/or pictures IV Cognitively Demanding + Context-reduced Example: Solving math word problems without manipulatives and/or pictures Cognitively Demanding + Context Reduced Scenario/Activity 30 ©Norma Godina-Silva, Jan. 2013

32 Quadrant III Quadrant? Answering history questions using a sentence frame. I Cognitively Undemanding + Context-embedded Example: Engaging in face-to-face social conversation with friends. II Cognitively Undemanding + Context-reduced Example: Engaging in social conversation on the telephone. III Cognitively Demanding + Context-embedded Example: Solving math word problems using manipulatives and/or pictures IV Cognitively Demanding + Context-reduced Example: Solving math word problems without manipulatives and/or pictures Cognitively Demanding + Context Embedded Scenario/Activity 31 ©Norma Godina-Silva, Jan. 2013

33 Quadrant II Quadrant? Selecting a movie from a list of movies. I Cognitively Undemanding + Context-embedded Example: Engaging in face-to-face social conversation with friends. II Cognitively Undemanding + Context-reduced Example: Engaging in social conversation on the telephone. III Cognitively Demanding + Context-embedded Example: Solving math word problems using manipulatives and/or pictures IV Cognitively Demanding + Context-reduced Example: Solving math word problems without manipulatives and/or pictures Cognitively Undemanding + Context Reduced Scenario/Activity 32 ©Norma Godina-Silva, Jan. 2013

34 Classifying Tasks by Language Demand Team Activity Locate activities at your table. In your teams, classify the student assigned tasks into the appropriate Quadrant. Be ready to share! 33 ©Norma Godina-Silva, Jan. 2013

35 Which Quadrant is Best for ELLs? Why? Are the Rest of the Quadrants Important? I Cognitively Undemanding + Context-embedded Example: Engaging in face-to-face social conversation with friends. II Cognitively Undemanding + Context-reduced Example: Engaging in social conversation on the telephone. III Cognitively Demanding + Context-embedded Example: Solving math word problems using manipulatives and/or pictures. IV Cognitively Demanding + Context-reduced Example: Solving math word problems without manipulatives and/or pictures 34 Source: Jodi Reiss, 2005 34 BICS CALP

36 Applying Sheltered Instruction to Quadrant IV Activities Select a Quadrant IV Activity. In your teams, decide how you will turn it into a Quadrant III activity. Be ready to share! Put activities back in envelopes/bags. 35 ©Norma Godina-Silva, Jan. 2013

37 Tools and Resources to Help You Implement Sheltered Instruction 36

38 Focusing on Relevance 37

39 38

40 What does relevant instruction look like in the classroom? Essential Question Think – Pair – Share 39

41 Relevance… for ELLs is key! Build the necessary academic background in order for ELLs to understand the concepts and make connections! Many concepts are irrelevant to ELLs unless you create relevance! Unique to American System of Education Content SpecificProcedural CCSS and NGA STAAR (Texas) American Revolutionshare 40 ©Norma Godina-Silva, Jan. 2013

42 1 2 3 4 5 6 12345 AB D C Rigor/Relevance Framework Knowledge Application Knows Understands 41 Source: International Center for Leadership in Education (ICLE)

43 A Relevant Lesson Asks Students to: USE THEIR KNOWLEDGE TO TACKLE REAL-WORLD PROBLEMS THAT HAVE MORE THAN ONE SOLUTION 42 Source: International Center for Leadership in Education (ICLE)

44 A Relevant Lesson Answers: What am I Learning? Why am I learning it? How will I use it? 43

45 Adding Relevancy to Any Learning Relate Learning to … Students life Sports, Arts, Hobbies Familys life Students community and friends Our world, nation, state World of work / service World of business that we interact with Students experiences as they continue to integrate into their new system of education and to the United States. Use Real World Examples Moral, ethical, political, cultural points of view and dilemmas Real world materials Internet resources Video and other media Scenarios, real life stories News - periodicals, media Lots of visuals, hands-on, concrete real world items 44

46 Focusing on Rigor 45

47 How would you define rigor for ELLs? What makes a lesson rigorous for ELL students? 46

48 KNOWLEDGE COMPREHENSION APPLICATION ANALYSIS SYNTHESIS EVALUATION RIGOR MEANS FRAMING LESSONS AT THE HIGH END OF THE KNOWLEDGE TAXONOMY. Is RIGOR for ELLs? YES, IT IS! 47

49 Verbs by Quadrant p. 5 Using R/R Handbook 48

50 Span/Eng Cognate Verbs by Quadrants 49 discriminate descriminar categorize – categorizar evaluate - evaluar classify – clasificar adapt – adaptar compose – componer conclude – concluir create – crear calculate – calcular name – nombrar count – contar recite – recitar adjust – ajustar interpret – interpretar apply – aplicar maintain – mantener ©Norma Godina-Silva, Jan. 2013

51 Spanish/Eng Cognate Verb List 50 Quadrant A calculate- calcular name - nombrar count - contar recite – recitar define - definir describe- describir identify – identificar list-hacer una lista memorize – memorizar view – ver select – seleccionar Quadrant B adjust – ajustar interpret – interpretar apply – aplicar maintain– mantener collect – colectar model – modelar construct – construir operate – operar dramatize – damatizar practice – practicar demonstrate – demonstrar resolve - resolver Quadrant C analyze -analizar discriminate – descriminar categorize – categorizar evaluate -evaluar classify - clasificar examine - examinar compare – comparar explain - explicar conclude- concluir express -expresar contrast – contrastar debate – debate infer – inferir defend –defender Quadrant D adapt – adaptar formulate – formular compose – componer invent – inventar conclude-concluir modify – modificar create – crear plan – planear design – diseñar predict – predicir explore – explorar propose – proponer recommend – recomendar revise – revisar prioritize- dar prioridad ©Norma Godina-Silva, Jan. 2013

52 Rigor for ELLs is… Scaffolding thinking Planning for thinking Assessing thinking about content Recognizing the level of thinking students demonstrate Managing the teaching/learning level for the desired thinking level Rigor for ELLs is not… More or easier worksheets Speaking louder Believing they cant think because they dont have the language More homework 51 ©Norma Godina-Silva, Jan. 2013. Adapted from International Center for Leadership in Education (ICLE)

53 PLDs (Proficiency Level Descriptors) Determined by language proficiency assessment Help determine degree of linguistic support and accommodations based on students level of English proficiency. 52 ©Norma Godina-Silva, Jan. 2013

54 Content and Language Objectives Content Objective: Which CCSS will you target? This becomes your Content Objective. Language Objective: Deciding how you will promote listening, speaking, reading, and writing during content area instruction. Post, Announce, Review, Assess 53 ©Norma Godina-Silva, Jan. 2013

55 Key Vocabulary Academic Vocabulary Content Words Process/Function Words Word or Word Parts That Teach English Structure Vocabulary Essential to the Lesson 54 ©Norma Godina-Silva, Jan. 2013

56 Lets Build the Background! Know Your Students Know What They Know Know What They Dont Know Build the Necessary Academic and Personal Background Knowledge Create Relevance! What do you need to do? How will you do it? 55 ©Norma Godina-Silva, Jan. 2013

57 The Daggett System for Effective Instruction (DSEI) Lets Reflect… How do my current instructional practices support ELLs and their acquisition of the knowledge and skills required to successfully meet the CCSS/STAAR? 56

58 Exit Slip Reflect and Share Self-question: What do I need to do now to effectively integrate sheltered instruction strategies into daily instruction? Complete the sentence frame: The first three steps I should take are 1. _____, 2. _____, and 3. _____. Share ideas with the group. STEP 1 STEP 2 STEP 3 57

59 Objectives Content Objective G ain knowledge and understanding of… The Rigor/Relevance Framework to close the achievement gap and ensure the academic and linguistic success of ELLs. The connection between R/R Framework, sheltered instruction, CCSS/STAAR, and the ELPS. Language Objective Engage in dialogue and write down reflective notes as next steps to an effective program of instruction for ELLs. 58


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