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ENHANCING STUDENT SUCCESS AND ACHIEVEMENT AT THE HIGH SCHOOL LEVEL FOREST GROVE HIGH SCHOOL PRESENTERS: John ONeill Jr., Principal FGHS Karen Robinson,

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Presentation on theme: "ENHANCING STUDENT SUCCESS AND ACHIEVEMENT AT THE HIGH SCHOOL LEVEL FOREST GROVE HIGH SCHOOL PRESENTERS: John ONeill Jr., Principal FGHS Karen Robinson,"— Presentation transcript:

1 ENHANCING STUDENT SUCCESS AND ACHIEVEMENT AT THE HIGH SCHOOL LEVEL FOREST GROVE HIGH SCHOOL PRESENTERS: John ONeill Jr., Principal FGHS Karen Robinson, Asst. Principal FGHS

2 SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT AREAS OF NEED (AS IDENTIFIED IN 2002-2003) Reduce drop out rate & increase passing rates Build relationships between staff & students Help kids feel connected Ease the transition of Freshmen into FGHS Need to identify students failing in a timely manner. Increase reading and math skill levels of students

3 FOREST GROVE HIGH SCHOOL CHARACTERISTICS 1,950 Student Population; Grades 9-12 61% Caucasian, 36% Latino, 3% Other 43% Free and Reduced Lunch 14% ELL Population 11% Special Needs Population

4 SCHOOL DATA EXAMINED 2002-2003 47% of previous years Freshmen below a 2.0 GPA Nearly half of all drop outs were ninth graders Low reading and math skills for sophomores: 50% met state reading benchmarks 31% met state math benchmarks 80% correlation between 9 th grade students reading below grade level and earning below a 2.0 GPA Need for disaggregated data in a timely manner

5 SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN 2003-2007 Apply for Smaller Learning Communities Grant (U.S. DOE) Create Teams at the 9 th and 10 th grade levels Restructure ELL Program Institute Intervention Meetings with Asst. Principals Refine and Expand Alternative Education Program Create Advisory Program- 4 year relationship Create Links Transition Program Create remedial intervention programs (Workshop Courses) Create capacity for on-going assessments Align core curriculum in: English, Math, Science, Social Studies Create six CAM Academies Increase communication with parents

6 SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN School Wide Staff Development Plan 2002-2008 2002-2003 What Works In Schools: Translating Research into Action- By Robert J. Marzano 2003 2003-2004 Differentiated Instruction 2004-2005 SOS (Student Owned Strategies) 2005-2006 SIOP (Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol) 2006-2007 Writing Across the Curriculum 2007-2008Power Standards/Alignment Grades 5-12

7 SYSTEMIC SCHOOL-WIDE FACTORS Based on Marzano, 2000a* Rank Factor #1: Opportunity to Learn Freshmen Students below a 239 are enrolled in a regular math and English as well as Math and Reading Workshop support electives. This structure maintains mainstream access along with individualized instruction through integrated approach.

8 CREATION OF REMEDIAL INTERVENTION PROGRAMS Math Workshop Utilizes PLATO math software to individualize student learning Creation of a 40 station 9 th grade lab & 40 station 10 th grade lab Creation of a Math Workshop Finishing Room that focuses upon individual math instruction that is teacher created. Utilization of State Sample Math Tests and teacher generated standards-based math problems which familiarize students with format of multiple choice questions

9 Math Peer Tutor Program Students who have mastered Algebra II or beyond Work directly with struggling students Decreases the student/teacher ratio Hugely benefits the peer tutors Looking to expand the program to other areas (Reading Workshop, etc…)

10 READING WORKSHOP Utilizes Accelerated Reading Program (www.renlearn.com) along with PowerLessons, oral readings, journaling and Daily Reading Logs.www.renlearn.com Individualized student reading levels are determined by STAR Reading assessment software. Students read novels at their instructional levels utilizing Sustained Silent Reading for 40 to 60 minutes per 88 minute block. When students finish their novel, they take a computerized ten question comprehension assessment and vocabulary assessment. Students earn points for the number of books read and the percent correct on vocabulary and comprehension tests.

11 Rank Factor #2: Time By requiring a regular math and English class as well as the Workshop elective classes, students receive double the time to learn and master skills tied to state standards.

12 Rank Factor #3: Monitoring All students are monitored on an on-going basis. Oregons on-line TESA state assessment provides three opportunities a year. Ninth graders in workshop classes take the test until they pass as do tenth graders. In previous years we used the long version first for strand information and the short one prior to the end of the first semester and at the end of the assessment window in the Spring. We also use PLATO assessments teacher generated assessments to help guide instruction. We use Mastery in Motion (MIM) software to provide disaggregated data to teachers for assessment and work-sample feedback. We have created a new classified position responsible for running our two TESA Labs and providing disaggregated data to teachers and others upon request.

13 Rank Factor #4: Pressure to Achieve Students are required to remain in Math and Reading Workshop electives until they pass the state exam with a score of 236 or higher. Both regular math and English teachers have on-going conversations with workshop teachers about student progress. Once passed, the required elective is replaced with an elective of the students choice at the start of the next semester.

14 Rank Factor #5: Parental Involvement Regular parental updates are provided by teachers through the use of eSIS Parent and Student Assistant, which is a web- based software that provides grades on specific assignments and attendance information. Teacher web page accounts on Moodle provides parents and students a course syllabus, a calendar of upcoming assignments and specific materials and resources.

15 Rank Factor #6: School Climate School-wide celebrations are held for academic and activity success. We conduct nine school-wide assemblies a year and academic achievement is celebrated in nearly all of them. Annual Student Surveys are conducted in late October for the past five years and provides an opportunity for students to provide anonymous feedback on various programs and resources.

16 Rank Factor #7: Leadership Strong support from site and district administrative teams; Site Leadership Team (Department Chairs and elected reps); Building Site Council and Local School Committee. Bi-Annual School Improvement Retreats of three days each have been held over the past six years to review current programs, student achievement, identify needs and set new school improvement goals. All stake-holders are represented at these retreats: students, parents, BSC, LSC, Leadership Team, school board members, district administration, all site administrators, workshop representatives, etc.

17 Rank Factor #8: Cooperation Any program is only as good as the people you have running it. Our Workshop teachers are some of the best we have on site. All workshop teachers believe all students can learn and they take personal responsibility for student growth and achievement. Our District Administrative Team is VERY supportive and has upheld high expectations. Source: Marzano, R.J. (200a*). A new era of school reform: Going where the research takes us. Aurora, CO: Mid-continent Research for Education and Learning. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED45455)

18 HIGHER EXPECTATIONS Students will stoop or strive to established expectations Our board has passed board policy requiring a 239 passing score in order to opt out of a workshop class. Our board has also passed promotion standards for our eighth graders. Eighth grade students must achieve a 2.0 grade point average for the year, passing math and language arts.

19 Higher passing rates on state assessments for all subgroups; Higher passing rates in core classes for 9 th and 10 th graders by first semester Lower Drop-out rate: - 01-02 School Year = 7.7% - 06-07 School Year = 2.9% Oregon Report Card overall rating: - 01-02 School Year = Satisfactory - 05-06 School Year = Strong (2 nd Year) - 06-07 School Year = Exceptional HIGHER RESULTS:

20 Table 1 FOREST GROVE HIGH SCHOOL READING & LITERATURE PERFORMANCE ON GRADE 10 ASSESSMENT STUDENTS MEETING OR EXCEEDING STATE STANDARD * 06-07 New Standard of 236.

21 2006-2007 FGHS Comparative Scores State Reading & Literature: Meets or Exceeds * FGHS Includes alternative program

22 Table 1 FOREST GROVE HIGH SCHOOL MATHEMATICS PERFORMANCE ON GRADE 10 ASSESSMENT STUDENTS MEETING OR EXCEEDING STATE STANDARD * 2006-07 New Standard of 236

23 2006-2007 FGHS Comparative Scores State Mathematics: Meets or Exceeds * FGHS Includes alternative program

24 FOREST GROVE HIGH SCHOOL NINTH GRADE PERFORMANCE Students that met or exceeded state 10 th grade assessment by the end of School Year 2006-2007: Subject 2005-2006 2006-2007 Reading5462 Math4257 Performance levels for Oregon: 2005-06 Meets was a 239; 2006-07 Meets is a 236. State 10 th Grade Average: Reading = 67%; Math = 57%

25 Closing the Achievement Gap 05-06: Math Gap between Hispanic and Caucasian Students: Eighth Grade:8 point rit gap Tenth Grade:4 point rit gap Math Gap between ELL and Caucasian Students: Eighth Grade:13 point rit gap Tenth Grade:8 point rit gap

26 Closing the Achievement Gap 05-06: Reading Gap between Hispanic and Caucasian Students: Eighth Grade:9 point rit gap Tenth Grade:5 point rit gap Reading Gap between ELL and Caucasian Students: Eighth Grade:16 point rit gap Tenth Grade:8 point rit gap

27

28 School Improvement Results: FGHS Reading Growth: 02/03 to 06/07 FGHS State AveFGHS Subgroup: 02/0306/0706/07 All49%67%81% LEP5%15%43% SPED5%24%56% Disadv.18%48%68% Hispanic19%39%63% Caucasian57%71%93%

29 School Improvement Results: FGHS Math Growth: 02/03 to 06/07 FGHS State AveFGHS Subgroup:02/0306/0706/07 All37%57%79% LEP3%18%51% SPED3%17%60% Disadv.10%38%68% Hispanic13%33%63% Caucasian45%60%89%

30 Stretch Learning Opportunities Extensive Elective Program provides multiple career pathway opportunities for students Six CAM Academies Arts / Communication Business Health Services Human Resources Industrial / Engineering Natural Resources

31 Stretch Learning Opportunities 21 Advanced Placement courses 138 seats taken in 8 AP Classes (01/02) 464 seats taken in 20 AP Classes (06/07) 24 Dual Credit courses 1,123 credits awarded (06/07)

32 Stretch Learning Opportunities 21 Advanced Placement courses 138 seats taken in 8 AP Classes (01/02) 464 seats taken in 20 AP Classes (06/07) 24 Dual Credit courses 1,123 credits awarded (06/07) Tualatin Academy Offered in conjunction with Pacific University Any junior or senior may enroll in one course per year at no cost

33 Advanced Placement Courses AP Art History AP Biology AP Calculus AP Chemistry AP English Lit. AP English Lang/Comp AP Environmental Sci. AP European History AP French Language AP German Language AP Govt and Politics AP Human Geography AP Japanese Language AP Music Theory AP Physics (online) AP Psychology AP Spanish Language AP Statistics AP Studio Art AP U.S. History AP World Studies AP Macroeconomics* AP Microeconomics* * Beginning 2008-09

34 Dual Credit Courses through Portland Community College Automotive Service Technology –Auto Tech I and II –Electrical System / Auto Tech I and II Building Construction Technology –Woods III –Architectural Drawing I and II –Advanced Business Construction Business Administration –Accounting I Computer App. Systems/Office Systems –Computer Applications/Comp Apps for Bus World –Webpage Design –Advanced Computer Applications Drafting Technology –Drafting I and II –Drafting II and III –Architectural Drafting I and II Early Childhood Education –Childcare II and III / Little Vikings Preschool Landscape Technology –Ag I / Biotechnology / Ag III –Landscape Design and Nursery Production –Intro to Horticulture / Exploring Plants Mathematics –Pre-calculus –Advanced Placement Calculus Medical Professions –Anatomy & Physiology –Medical Terminology Welding –Metals I

35 Contact Information: John ONeill Principal, Forest Grove High School joneill@fgsd.k12.or.us (503)359-2443 Karen Robinson Assistant Principal krobinson@fgsd.k12.or.us (503)359-2522


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