Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Algorithms Algorithms. Automate This: How Algorithms Came to Rule Our World Christopher Steiner.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Algorithms Algorithms. Automate This: How Algorithms Came to Rule Our World Christopher Steiner."— Presentation transcript:

1 Algorithms Algorithms

2 Automate This: How Algorithms Came to Rule Our World Christopher Steiner

3 April 2011. Prof Michael Eisen goes to Amazon to buy book The Making of a Fly. Expects price to be $35-$40. Follows bid war for 3 days: Price hits $23,698,655.93. Culprit: Unsupervised [pricing] algorithm. (Parallels 5/6/10 Wall Street flash crash: Market dropped 1K points in about 5 minutes.) From: Christopher Steiner, Automate This: How Algorithms Came to Rule Our World

4 Algorithms have already written symphonies as moving as those composed by Beethoven, picked through legalese with the deftness of a senior law partner, diagnosed patients with more accuracy than a doctor, written news articles with the smooth hand of a seasoned reporter, and driven vehicles on the smooth hand of a seasoned reporter, and driven vehicles on urban highways with far better control than a human driver. urban highways with far better control than a human driver. From: Christopher Steiner, Automate This: How Algorithms Came to Rule Our World

5 Shades of Ned Ludd … When Emmy [algorithm] produced orchestral pieces so impressive that some music scholars failed to identify them as the work of a machine, [Prof. David] Cope instantly created legions of enemies. … At an academic conference in Germany, one of his peers walked up to him and whacked him on the nose. … his peers walked up to him and whacked him on the nose. … Christopher Steiner, Automate This: How Algorithms Came to Rule Our World

6 … The audience then voted on the identity of each composition.* [Music theory professor and contest organizer] Larsons pride took a ding when his piece was fingered as that belonging to the computer. When the crowd decided that [algorithm] Emmys piece was the true product of the late musician [Bach], Larson winced. Christopher Steiner, … The audience then voted on the identity of each composition.* [Music theory professor and contest organizer] Larsons pride took a ding when his piece was fingered as that belonging to the computer. When the crowd decided that [algorithm] Emmys piece was the true product of the late musician [Bach], Larson winced. Christopher Steiner, Automate This: How Algorithms Came to Rule Our World *There were three: Bach/Larson/Emmy-the-algorithm.

7 … The audience then voted on the identity of each composition.* [Music theory professor and contest organizer] Larsons pride took a ding when his piece was fingered as that belonging to the computer. When the crowd decided that [algorithm] Emmys piece was the true product of the late musician, Larson winced. Christopher Steiner, Automate This: … The audience then voted on the identity of each composition.* [Music theory professor and contest organizer] Larsons pride took a ding when his piece was fingered as that belonging to the computer. When the crowd decided that [algorithm] Emmys piece was the true product of the late musician, Larson winced. Christopher Steiner, Automate This: How Algorithms Came to Rule Our World *There were three: Bach/Larson/Emmy-the-algorithm.

8 … Which haiku are human writing and which are from a group of bits? Sampling centuries of haiku, devising rules, spotting patterns, and inventing ways to inject originality, Annie [algorithm] took to the short Japanese sets of prose the same way all of [Prof David] Copes. algorithms tackled classical music. In the end, its just layers and layers of binary math, he says. … Cope says Annies penchant for tasteful originality could push her past most human composers who simply build on work of the past., which, in turn, was built on older works. … Christopher Steiner, Automate This: How Algorithms Came to Rule Our World … Which haiku are human writing and which are from a group of bits? Sampling centuries of haiku, devising rules, spotting patterns, and inventing ways to inject originality, Annie [algorithm] took to the short Japanese sets of prose the same way all of [Prof David] Copes. algorithms tackled classical music. In the end, its just layers and layers of binary math, he says. … Cope says Annies penchant for tasteful originality could push her past most human composers who simply build on work of the past., which, in turn, was built on older works. … Christopher Steiner, Automate This: How Algorithms Came to Rule Our World

9 Other

10 Software Seen Giving Grades on Essay Tests Headline, p 1, New York Times /0405.13

11 The first step is to measure what can easily be measured. This is okay as far as it goes. The second step is to disregard that which cannot be measured, or give it an arbitrary quantitative value. This is artificial and misleading. The third step is to presume that what cannot be measured is not very important. This is blindness. The fourth step is to say that what cannot be measured does not really exist. This is suicide. Daniel Yankelovich (from Enough!, by Jack Bogle)

12 The median worker is losing the race against the machine. Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee, The Race Against the Machine

13 The root of our problem is not that were in a Great Recession that were in a Great Recession or a Great Stagnation, but rather or a Great Stagnation, but rather that we are in the early that we are in the early throes of a. Our technologies are racing ahead, throes of a Great Restructuring. Our technologies are racing ahead, but our skills and organizations but our skills and organizations are lagging behind. are lagging behind. Source: Race AGAINST the Machine, Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee

14 In some sense you can argue that the science fiction scenario is already starting to happen. The computers are in control. We just live in their world. Danny Hillis, Thinking Machines

15 Multiple Choice Examination Multiple Choice Examination You will you lose your job to; choose one … (1) An offshore contractor? (2) A computer? (White collar) (3) A robot? (Blue collar) Source: Adapted from Dan Pink

16 I believe that ninety percent of white-collar jobs in the U.S. will be either destroyed or altered beyond recognition in the next 10 to 15 years. ( 22 May 2000/ cover/Time magazine)


Download ppt "Algorithms Algorithms. Automate This: How Algorithms Came to Rule Our World Christopher Steiner."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google