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1 NOTE: To appreciate this presentation [and ensure that it is not a mess], you need Microsoft fonts: “Showcard Gothic,” “Ravie,” “Chiller” and “Verdana”

2 NOTE: To appreciate this presentation, you need Microsoft fonts: “Showcard Gothic,” “Ravie,” “Chiller” and “Verdana” Master Excellence. Always. part FIVE (of 7) people! (Brand you. Talent. Health. Education.) 19 October 2007

3 THE MASTER PRESENTATION: There are about 3,500 slides in this 7-part “Master Presentation.” The first six “chapters” are indeed meant add up to a logical, linear argument. Part I is context. Part II is devoted entirely to innovation—the sine qua non, as perhaps never before, of survival. In earlier incarnations of the “master,” “innovation” “stuff” was scattered throughout the presentation—now it is front and center and a stand-alone. Part III is a variation on the innovation theme—but it is organized to examine the imperative (for most everyone in the developed world) of an ultra high value-added strategy. A “value-added ladder” (the “ladder” configuration lifted with gratitude from Joe Pine and Jim Gilmore’s Experience Economy) lays out a specific logic for necessarily leaving commodity-like goods and services in the dust. Part IV argues that in this age of “micro-marketing” there are two macro-markets of astounding size that are dramatically under-attended by all but a few; namely women and boomers-geezers. Part V underpins the overall argument with the necessary bedrock—Talent, with brief consideration of Education & Healthcare. Part VI examines Leadership for turbulent times from several angles. Despite the “logical argument,” I think you’d be better off if you thought of “all this” as I do—an ENCYCLOPEDIA OF IDEAS. Various “riffs” are attached throughout which, though not perfect fits, serve my purpose as “meat” from which I cobble together a finance presentation in Bahrain … or a health-services lecture in Virginia. For example, the day I wrote this I spoke to an association made up of independent middle-size companies. I led off with a new section on the place for and power of middle-sized firms in general, featuring the German Mittelstand—which is the basis for that country’s surprise ranking as the world’s #1 exporter. These agile players, residing in the ultimate high-wage nation, tend to “own” a niche courtesy astoundingly high-value-added products. This “Mittelstand opener” does not fit in the Master in a tidy fashion, but I want it to be available for future use and it works pretty well in the overall innovation argument—hence its landing in Part II. The placement is not bad, but the point is that this “idea” is now available to me—and you—in my “encyclopedia.” And there you have it! 19 October 2007

4 NOTE: To appreciate this presentation, you need Microsoft fonts: “Showcard Gothic,” “Ravie,” “Chiller” and “Verdana” Master Excellence. Always. part one (of 7) “all you need to know” (dwelling on the obvious) not your father’s world introduction to excellence.

5 NOTE: To appreciate this presentation, you need Microsoft fonts: “Showcard Gothic,” “Ravie,” “Chiller” and “Verdana” Master* Excellence part two (of 7) innovate. Or. Die.

6 NOTE: To appreciate this presentation, you need Microsoft fonts: “Showcard Gothic,” “Ravie,” “Chiller” and “Verdana” Master/ Excellence. Always./ part THREE (of 7) up, up, up, up … the value added ladder (solutions-experiences-dreams-lovemarks)

7 NOTE: To appreciate this presentation, you need Microsoft fonts: “Showcard Gothic,” “Ravie,” “Chiller” and “Verdana” Master/ Excellence. Always./ part FOUR (of 7) “new” Markets (Stupendous Opportunity)

8 NOTE: To appreciate this presentation, you need Microsoft fonts: “Showcard Gothic,” “Ravie,” “Chiller” and “Verdana” Master Excellence. Always. part six (of 7) leadership!

9 NOTE: To appreciate this presentation, you need Microsoft fonts: “Showcard Gothic,” “Ravie,” “Chiller” and “Verdana” Master* Excellence part Seven (of 7) excellence. summaries. Lists.

10 Tom Peters’ X25. EXCELLENCE. ALWAYS. MASTER/Part FIVE
Tom Peters’ X25* EXCELLENCE. ALWAYS. MASTER/Part FIVE *In Search of Excellence

11 NOTE: The gray slides (like this one) throughout are explanatory notes not found in my regular presentations.

12 Part FIVE

13 Slides at … tompeters.com

14 Welcome to Tom Peters “PowerPoint World”
Welcome to Tom Peters “PowerPoint World”! Beyond the set of slides here, you will find at tompeters.com the last eight years of presentations, a basketful of “Special Presentations,” and, above all, Tom’s constantly updated Master Presentation—from which most of the slides in this presentation are drawn. There are about 3,500 slides in the 7-part “Master Presentation.” The first five “chapters” constitute the main argument: Part I is context. Part II is devoted entirely to innovation—the sine qua non, as perhaps never before, of survival. In earlier incarnations of the “master,” “innovation” “stuff” was scattered throughout the presentation—now it is front and center and a stand-alone. Part III is a variation on the innovation theme—but it is organized to examine the imperative (for most everyone in the developed-emerging world) of an ultra high value-added strategy. A “value-added ladder” (the “ladder” configuration lifted with gratitude from Joe Pine and Jim Gilmore’s Experience Economy) lays out a specific logic for necessarily leaving commodity-like goods and services in the dust. Part IV argues that in this age of “micro-marketing” there are two macro-markets of astounding size that are dramatically under-attended by all but a few; namely women and boomers-geezers. Part V underpins the overall argument with the necessary bedrock—Talent, with brief consideration of Education & Healthcare. Part VI examines Leadership for turbulent times from several angles. Part VII is a collection of a dozen Lists—such as Tom’s “Irreducible 209,” 209 “things I’ve learned along the way.” Enjoy! Download! “Steal”—that’s the whole point!

15 Peo-ple

16 EXCELLENCE. INDIVIDUAL. BRAND YOU.

17 Globalization1. 0: Countries globalizing (1492-1800) Globalization2
Globalization1.0: Countries globalizing ( ) Globalization2.0: Companies globalizing ( ) Globalization3.0 (2000+): Individuals collaborating & competing globally Source: Tom Friedman/The World Is Flat

18 BRAND YOU. NO OPTION.

19 “You are the storyteller of your own life, and you can create your own legend or not.” —Isabel Allende

20 “Carpenters bend wood; fletchers bend arrows; wise men fashion themselves.” — Buddha

21 “Nobody gives you power. You just take it.” —Roseanne

22 “One of the defining characteristics [of the change] is that it will be less driven by countries or corporations and more driven by real people. It will unleash unprecedented creativity, advancement of knowledge, and economic development. But at the same time, it will tend to undermine safety net systems and penalize the unskilled.” —Clyde Prestowitz, Three Billion New Capitalists

23 Source: Muhammad Yunus/The News Hour—PBS/1122.2006
Muhammad Yunus: “All human beings are entrepreneurs. When we were in the caves we were all self-employed finding our food, feeding ourselves. That’s where human history began As civilization came we suppressed it. We became labor because they stamped us, ‘You are labor.’ We forgot that we are entrepreneurs.” Source: Muhammad Yunus/The News Hour—PBS/

24 12January2006 Happy 300 th, Brand You!

25 The electrician knows!

26 “If there is nothing very special about your work, no matter how hard you apply yourself you won’t get noticed, and that increasingly means you won’t get paid much either.” —Michael Goldhaber, Wired

27 Distinct … or … Extinct

28 1. Can someone overseas do it cheaper. 2. Can a computer do it faster
1. Can someone overseas do it cheaper? 2. Can a computer do it faster? 3. Is what you’re selling in demand in an age of abundance? Source: Dan Pink

29 The Rule of Positioning “If you can’t describe your position in eight words or less, you don’t have a position.” — Jay Levinson and Seth Godin, Get What You Deserve!

30 Core Mechanism: “Game-changing Solutions” PSF (Professional Service Firm “model”/The Organizing Principle) + Brand You (“Distinct” or “Extinct”/The Talent) + Wow! Projects (“Different” vs “Better”/The Work)

31 New Work SurvivalKit.2007 1. MASTERY! (Best/Absurdly Good at Something!) 2. “Manage” to Legacy (All Work = “Memorable”/“Braggable” WOW Projects!) 3. A “USP”/UNIQUE SELLING PROPOSITION 4. Rolodex Obsession (From vertical/hierarchy/“suck up” loyalty to horizontal/“colleague”/“mate” loyalty) 5. ENTREPRENEURIAL INSTINCT (A sleepless … Eye for Opportunity! 6.CEO/LEADER/BUSINESSPERSON/CLOSER (CEO, Me Inc. 24/7!) 7. Master of Improv (Play a dozen parts simultaneously, from Chief Strategist to Chief Toilet Scrubber) 8. Sense of Humor (A willingness to Screw Up & Move On) 9. Comfortable with Your Skin (Bring “interesting you” to work!) 10. Intense Appetite for Technology (E.g.: How Cool-Active is your Web site? Do you Blog?) 11. EMBRACE “MARKETING” (Your own CSO/Chief Storytelling Officer) 12. PASSION FOR RENEWAL (Your own CLO/Chief Learning Officer) 13. EXECUTION EXCELLENCE! (Show up on time! Leave last!)

32 ACTING: Think of a person as a “troupe of actors
ACTING: Think of a person as a “troupe of actors.” (“Many truths about oneself” which must all be understood if one is to know oneself.) Source: A..C. Grayling, The Meaning of Things: Applying Philosophy to Life

33 Thriving in 24/7 (Sally Helgesen). START AT THE CORE
Thriving in 24/7 (Sally Helgesen) *START AT THE CORE. Nimbleness only possible if we “locate our inner voice,” take regular inventory of where we are. *LEARN TO ZIGZAG. Think “gigs.” Think lifelong learning. Forget “old loyalty.” Work on optimism. *CREATE OUR OWN WORK. Articulate your value. Integrate your passions. I.D. your market. Run your own business. *WEAVE A STRONG WEB OF INCLUSION. Build your own support network. Master the art of “looking people up.”

34 Personal “Brand Equity” Evaluation
My current Project is challenging me … New things I’ve learned in the last 90 days include … I am known for [2 to 3 things]; next year at this time I’ll also be known for [1 more thing]. My public “recognition program” consists of … Additions to my Rolodex in the last 90 days include … My resume is discernibly different from last year’s at this time …

35 R.D.A. Rate: 15%?, 25%? Therefore: Formal “Investment Strategy”/R.I.P.* *Renewal Investment Plan

36 R. D. A. Rate: 15%. 25%. Therefore: Formal “Investment Strategy”/ R. I
R.D.A.* Rate: 15%? 25%? Therefore: Formal “Investment Strategy”/ R.I.P.** *Rapidly Depreciating Asset (You!) **Renewal Investment Plan

37 “The only thing you have power over is to get good at what you do
“The only thing you have power over is to get good at what you do. That’s all there is; there ain’t no more!” —Sally Field

38 Richard Sennett: “Craftsmanship,” “a sustaining life narrative” Source: Stefan Stern on Management, FT,

39 “Worthy” Ambition vs. “Mere” Ambition per MILTON “The difference is well illustrated by the contrast between the person who says he ‘wishes to be a writer’ and the person who says he ‘wishes to write.’ The former desires to be pointed out at cocktail parties, the latter is prepared for the long, solitary hours at as desk; the former desires a status, the latter a process; the former desires to be, the latter to do.” —A..C. Grayling, The Meaning of Things: Applying Philosophy to Life [C.f. JOHN BOYD on “be-do.”]

40 “Happiness” & “Leisure” per ARISTOTLE HAPPINESS: Eudaimonia … well-doing, living flourishingly. Megalopsychos … “great-souled,” “magnanimous.” More: respect and concern for others; duty to improve oneself; using one’s gifts to the fullest extent possible; fully aware; making one’s own choices. LEISURE: pursue excellence; reflect; deepen understanding; opportunity to work for higher ends. [“Rest” vs. “leisure.”] Source: A.C. Grayling, The Meaning of Things: Applying Philosophy to Life

41 “My ancestors were printers in Amsterdam from 1510 or so until 1750, and during that entire time they didn’t have to learn anything new.” —Peter Drucker, Business 2.0

42 “Knowledge becomes obsolete incredibly fast
“Knowledge becomes obsolete incredibly fast. The continuing professional education of adults is the No. 1 industry in the next 30 years … mostly on line.” —Peter Drucker, Business 2.0

43 1 Person! Wendy Kopp, Princeton senior (1989) Teach America (19,000-2,400) 10% Dartmouth, Yale 17,000 to date Principal hirer of college graduates “One of the few jobs that people pass up Goldman Sachs for is Teach America” (Edie Hunt, HR) Source: Fortune,

44 eliot + 7

45 “It’s always showtime.” —David D’Alessandro, Career Warfare

46 “To Be somebody or to Do something” BOYD: The Fighter Pilot Who Changed the Art of War (Robert Coram)

47 “When was the last time you asked, ‘What do I want to be
“When was the last time you asked, ‘What do I want to be?’ ” —Sara Ann Friedman, Work Matters

48 “All of our artistic and religious traditions take equally great pains to inform us that we must never mistake a good career for good work. Life is a creative, intimate, unpredictable conversation if it is nothing else—and our life and our work are both the result of the way we hold that passionate conversation.” —David Whyte, Crossing the Unknown Sea: Work as a Pilgrimage of Identity

49 A “position” is not an “accomplishment.” —TP

50 BLAME NOBODY. EXPECT NOTHING. DO SOMETHING.
Source: Locker room sign posted by football coach Bill Parcells

51 Advice to techie mid-career “Brand You”s: Smith college (06.05)

52 TP’s “Top Dozen” Commandments 1
TP’s “Top Dozen” Commandments 1. Enthusiasm, Optimism and Energy carry the day. 2. She who delivers the Best Projects wins. (Be-Do.) (Your inherent advantages enhance the odds of delivering “ladle dropper” projects. USE THEM.) 3. There are sympathizers. FIND THEM. (“Make your own McKinsey.”) 4. Indirection rules; frontal attacks are for boneheads. (“My mission is that of a mole—my existence only to be known by upheavals.” —John Fisher) 5. Accept a Lateral Move to get X-functional experience. (!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!) 6. Take a crappy line job whenever it’s offered! (There’s no such thing as a “crappy line job”!)

53 TP’s “Top Dozen” Commandments 7
TP’s “Top Dozen” Commandments 7. Understand the “Soft” New Value-added Equation … and Master/Exploit it. 8. DO GREAT THINGS FOR CUSTOMERS! (It’s the best form of protection from idiots!) 9. Always Champion Change … and find a Protector! 10. Life (SUCCESS) = Mastery of Sales & Politics (Believe it!) 11. Get involved in Recruiting and Development Activities! (“We’re all in HR.”) (Find Radical Young Women and become their Champion.) 12. If it ain’t working, get the hell out. (What about joining the “Mighty Eleven Million” and starting your own business?)

54 “This is the true joy of Life, the being used for a purpose recognized by yourself as a mighty one … the being a force of Nature instead of a feverish, selfish little clod of ailments and grievances complaining that the world will not devote itself to making you happy.” —GB Shaw/ Man and Superman

55 “How Would You Play Today If You Knew You Could Not Play Tomorrow” Source: Slogan for Loyola’s lacrosse season, from coach Diane Geppi-Aikens (Lucky Every Day: The Wisdom of Diane Geppi-Aikens, by Chip Silverman)

56 “Make each day a Masterpiece!” —JW

57 Joe J. Jones 1942 – 2006 HE WOULDA DONE SOME REALLY COOL STUFF BUT … HIS BOSS WOULDN’T LET HIM!

58 “Do one thing every day that scares you.” —Eleanor Roosevelt

59 “Tell me, what is it you plan to do with your one wild and precious life?” —Mary Oliver

60 My Kinda Folks! Tom Peters/0720.2005

61 My Kinda Folks!* *“Do” vs “Be”** (The task, not the title, is important) (**Military strategist extraordinaire Col John Boyd: 2 kinds of people. “Do” … focus obsessively on “the work itself”—and damn the torpedoes. “Be” … obsess on the politics, the rank, the next promotion or assignment.) *Intuitive > Purely logical. (Routinely make strange connections) *Incredible passion for the work/Lingering idealism (though also cynical—paradox) *Persistent/Relentless (to a fault) *Like the long shots (Don Quixote-ish) *Stay on the case long after being ordered to drop it *See James Lee Burke, Ian Rankin, John Harvey, etc.

62 My Kinda Folks! *Cases no one else wants (hot potatoes, dead ends, political nightmares, “unimportant” victims) *Constant thorns in the side of bureaucracy!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! *Repeatedly exiled to professional “Siberia” (so annoyingly good and so annoying per se that others try to do him terminal professional harm) *Little in the way of career prospects *Have a “Godfather” (need internal protection—though even protectors lose patience) *Work mostly solo (Secretive) *“Work” “old pals network” to get info-leads beyond their charter

63 My Kinda Folks! *Master of the End Run!
*Mentor (often to an incredibly talented young woman fighting the sexist culture) *Curmudgeonly *Often their own worst enemies *Drink too much *Don’t work out enough *Sneak fast food *Excessive work has estranged from family *More or less shabbily dressed *Drive shabby cars *Not money/security oriented (can’t help themselves, just gotta get involved)

64 *GET THE DAMN JOB DONE! (and don’t expect/get much appreciation)
My Kinda Folks! *Not money/security oriented (can’t help themselves, just gotta get involved) *Carry a secret/hidden motivator in their kit (e.g. someone close he feels he let down, leading to their death) *GET THE DAMN JOB DONE! (and don’t expect/get much appreciation)

65 Brand Essentials:. Mastering Sales/The Sales25
Brand Essentials: *Mastering Sales/The Sales25. *Getting Things Done/The Power & Implementation34. *presentation Excellence/ The PresX56. *interviewing Excellence/ The IntX31

66 Brand you tool #1: Mastering Sales … The Sales25.

67 “Everyone lives by selling something.” —Robert Louis Stevenson

68 Great Salespeople … 1. Know the product
Great Salespeople … 1. Know the product. (Find cool mentors, and use them.) 2. Know the company. 3. Know the customer. (Including the customer’s consultants.) (And especially the “corporate culture.”) 4. Love internal politics at home and abroad. 5. Religiously respect competitors. (No badmouthing, no matter how provoked.) 6. Wire the customer’s org. (Relationships at all levels & functions.) 7. Wire the home team’s org. and vendors’ orgs. (INVEST Big Time time in relationships at all levels & functions.) (Take junior people in all functions to client meetings.)

69 It’s politics, stupid! (Play or sit on the sidelines.)

70 Great Salespeople … 8. Never overpromise
Great Salespeople … 8. Never overpromise. (Even if it costs you your job.) 9. Sell only by solving problems-creating profitable opportunities. (“Our product solves these problems, creates these unimagined INCREDIBLE opportunities, and will make you a ton of money—here’s exactly how.”) (IS THIS A “PRODUCT SALE” OR A WOW-ORIGINAL SOLUTION YOU’LL BE DINING OFF 5 YEARS FROM NOW? THAT WILL BE WRITTEN UP IN THE TRADE PRESS?) 10. Will involve anybody—including mortal enemies—if it enhances the scope of the problem we can solve and increases the scope of the opportunity we can encompass. 11. Know the Brand Story cold; live the Brand Story. (If not, leave.)

71 Great Salespeople … 12. Think “Turnkey. ” (It’s always your problem
Great Salespeople … 12. Think “Turnkey.” (It’s always your problem!) 13. Act as “orchestra conductor”: You are responsible for making the whole-damn-network respond. (PERIOD.) 14. Help the customer get to know the vendor’s organization & build up their Rolodex. 15. Walk away from bad business. (Even if it gets you fired.) 16. Understand the idea of a “good loss.” (A bold effort that’s sometimes better than a lousy win.) 17. Think those who regularly say “It’s all a price issue” suffer from rampant immaturity & shrunken imagination. 18. Will not give away the store to get a foot in the door Are wary & respectful of upstarts—the real enemy. 20. Seek several “cool customers”—who’ll drag you into Tomorrowland.

72 “If you don’t listen, you don’t sell anything
“If you don’t listen, you don’t sell anything.” —Carolyn Marland/Managing Director/Guardian Group

73 Great Salespeople … 21. Use the word “partnership” obsessively, even though it is way overused. (“Partnership” includes folks at all levels throughout the supply chain.) 22. Send thank you notes by the truckload. (NOT E-NOTES.) (Most are for “little things.”) (50% of those notes are sent to those in our company!) Remember birthdays. Use the word “we.” 23. When you look across the table at the customer, think religiously to yourself: “HOW CAN I MAKE THIS DUDE RICH & FAMOUS & GET HIM-HER PROMOTED?” 24. Great salespeople can affirmatively respond to the query in an HP banner ad: HAVE YOU CHANGED CIVILIZATION TODAY? 25. Keep your bloody PowerPoint slides simple!

74 “Success or Failure”? Try Instead “Optimism or Failure”!
From Martin Seligman’s Learned Optimism: “I believe the traditional wisdom is incomplete. A composer can have all the talent of a Mozart and a passionate desire to succeed, but if he believes he cannot compose music, he will come to nothing. He will not try hard enough. He will give up too soon when the elusive right melody takes too long to materialize. Success requires persistence, the ability to not give up in the face of failure. I believe that … OPTIMISTIC EXPLANATORY STYLE … is the key to persistence. “The optimistic-explanatory-style theory of success says that in order to choose people for success in a challenging job, you need to select for three characteristics: (1) Aptitude. (2) Motivation. (3) Optimism. All three determine success.” (Note: Seligman’s extensive work with Met Life salespeople, among others, proved out the above—in spades.)

75 Pessimist: Good things … “I’m worthless, but got lucky on this one
Pessimist: Good things … “I’m worthless, but got lucky on this one.” Bad things … “I’m a bozo who deserved my sorry fate.” Optimist: Good things … “I deserved that; I’m the cat’s meow.” Bad things … “I’m the cat’s meow, but the cat had an unlucky day; tomorrow will be better for sure.”

76 GETTING TO YES … Roger Fisher, William Ury, Bruce Patton
Three for the Ages GETTING TO YES … Roger Fisher, William Ury, Bruce Patton LEARNED OPTIMISM … Martin Seligman CRUCIAL CONFRONTATIONS … Kerry Patterson, Joseph Grenny, Ron McMillan, Al Switzler

77 Brand you tool #2: Getting Things Done … The Power & Implementation34.

78 Send “Thank You” notes. It’s (always) “all about relationships
*Send “Thank You” notes! It’s (always) “all about relationships.” And at the Heart of Effective Relationships is … APPRECIATION. (Oh yeah: Never, ever forget a birthday of a co-worker.) *Bring donuts! “Small” gestures of appreciation (on a rainy day, after a long day’s work the day before) are VBDs … Very Big Deals. *Make the call! One short, hard-to-make call today can avert a relationship crisis that could bring you down six months from now. *Remember: There are no “little gestures” of kindness. As boss, stopping by someone’s cube … for 30 seconds … to inquire about their sick parent will be remembered for … 10 years. (Trust me.) *Make eye contact! No big deal? Wrong! “It” is all about … Connection! Paying attention! Being there … in the Moment … Present. So, work on your eye contact, your Intent to Connect. *Smile! Or, rather: SMILE. Rule: Smiles beget smiles. Frowns beget frowns. Rule: WORK ON THIS. *Smile! (If it kills you.) Energy & enthusiasm & passion engender energy-enthusiasm-passion in those we work with.

79 “Find something small that you can turn around
“Find something small that you can turn around. If you’re on a 9-game losing streak, you need to start with one great inning.” —Rudy G

80 “What’s most important. ” “Everything
“What’s most important?” “Everything!”/ Searching for Antidotes: FOCUS [2 things/120 days][2 = 90%] CLARITY [10 words, max] INTENSITY ENTHUSIASM HUMOR [a game] OPTIMISM [If it kills you] VISIBILITY REPITITION [3/day] EXTREME [1/week]

81 Master the intricacies of the system —Tom DeLay (Al Smith, LBJ)

82 It’s all … RELATIONSHIPS
*It’s all … RELATIONSHIPS. Remember: Business is a relationships business. (Period.) We’re all in sales! (Period.) Connecting! Making our case! Following up! Networking! “Relationships” are what we “do.” *You = Your Calendar. Your true priorities are “given away” by your calendar. YOUR CALENDAR NEVER LIES. What are you truly spending your time on? Are you distracted? Focused? *What’s in a number? EVERYTHING! While we all “do a hundred things,” we may not/should not/cannot have more than 2 (or 3) true “strategic” priorities at any point in time. BELIEVE IT. *She (he) who is best prepared wins! Out study, out-read, out-research the competition. Know more (lots more!) than “the person on the other side of the table.” *“Excellence” is the Ultimate Cool Idea. The very idea of “pursuing excellence” is a turn on—for you and me as well as those we work with. (And, I find to my dismay, it’s surprisingly rare.) *Think WOW! Language matters! “Hot” words generate a Hot Team. Watch your language! *Take a break! We need all the creativity we can muster these days. So close your office door and do 5 (FIVE) minutes of breathing or yoga; get a bag lunch today and eat it in the park.

83 *You are the boss! Old ideas of “lifetime employment” at one company (maybe where Dad/Mom worked) are gone. No matter what your current status, think of your self as CEO of Brand Me, Inc. We are all Small Business Owners … of our own careers. *Do something in … the next half hour! Don’t let yourself get stuck! There is … ALWAYS … something little you can start/do in the next thirty minutes to make a wee, concrete step forward with a problem-opportunity. *Test it! NOW! We call this the “Quick Prototype Attitude.” One of life’s, especially business life’s, biggest problems is: “Too much ‘talk’, too little ‘do’.” If you’ve got a Cool Idea, don’t sit on it or research it to death. Grab a pal, an empty conference, and start laying out a little model. That is, begin the process of transforming the Idea to Action … ASAP. Incidentally, testing something quarter-baked in an approximation of the real world is the quickest way to learn. *Expand your horizons. Routinely reach out beyond your comfort zone. TAKE A FREAK TO LUNCH TOMORROW! Call somebody interesting “you’ve been meaning to get in touch with;” invite them to lunch tomorrow. (Lunch with “the same ole gang means nothing new learned. And that’s a guarantee.) (Remember: Discomfort = Growth.) *Build a Web site. The Web is ubiquitous. Play with it! Be a presence! Start You.com … ASAP!

84 *Spread the credit! Don’t build monuments to yourself, build them to others—those whose contributions we wholeheartedly acknowledge will literally follow us into machine gun fire! *Follow Tom’s patented VFCJ strategy! VFCJ = Volunteer For Crappy Jobs. That is, volunteer for the crummy little assignment nobody else wants, but will give you a chance to (1) be on your own, (2) express your creativity, and (3) make a noticeable mark when it turns out “Wow.” *VOLUNTEER! Life’s a maze, and you never know what’s connected to what. (Six degrees of separation, and all that.) So volunteer for that Community Center fund raising drive, even though you’re busy as all get out. You might end up working side-by-side with the president of a big company who’s looking for an enthusiast like you, or someone wealthy who might be interested in investing in the small business you dream of starting. *Join Toastmasters! You don’t need to try and match Ronald Reagan’s speaking skills, but you do need to be able to “speak your piece” with comfort, confidence and authority. Organizations like Toastmasters can help … enormously. *Dress for success! This one is old as the hills and I hate it!! But it’s true. FIRST IMPRESSIONS DO MATTER. (A lot!!!)

85 Follow the Gospel of “Experience Marketing” in all you do
*Follow the Gospel of “Experience Marketing” in all you do. The shrewdest marketers today tell us that selling a “product” or “service” is not enough in a crowded marketplace for everything. Every interaction must be reframed as a … Seriously Cool Experience. That includes the “little” 15-minute presentation you are giving to your 4 peers tomorrow. *Think of your resume as an Annual Report on Brand Me Inc. It’s not about keeping your resume “updated.” It is about having a Super-cool Annual Report. (Tom Peters Inc 2004.) What are your “stunning” accomplishments that you can add to that Report each 6 months, or at the most annually? *Build a Great Team … even if you are not boss. Best roster wins, right? So, work on your roster. Meet someone new at Church or your kid’s birthday party? Add them to your team (Team Tom); you never know when they might be able to assist you or give you ideas or support for something you are working on. *She or he who has the Fattest & and Best-managed Rolodex wins. Your Rolodex is your most cherished possession! Have you added 3 names to it in the last 2 weeks? Have you renewed acquaintance ( , lunch, gym date) with 3 people in your Rolodex in the last month? “MANAGE” YOUR ROLODEX!

86 Start your own business. Sure that’s radical
*Start your own business! Sure that’s radical. But people are doing it—especially women—by the millions. Let the idea percolate. Chat about it, perhaps, with pals. Start a file folder or three on things you Truly Care About … that just might be the basis for Cool Self-employment. *There’s nothing cooler than an Angry Customer! The most loyal customers are ones who had a problem with us … and then marveled when we went the Extra Ten Miles to fix it! Business opportunity No. 1 = Irate customers converted into fans. So … are you on the prowl for customer problems to fix? *All “marketing” is Relationship Marketing. In business, profit is a byproduct of “bringing ’em back.” Thus, systematic and intense and repeated Follow-up and After-sales Service and Scintillating New Hooks are of the utmost importance.

87 *BRANDING ain’t just for Big Dudes. This may well be Business Mistake No. 1 … the idea that “branding” is only for the likes of Coke and Sony and Nike. Baloney! Branding applies as much for the one-person accountancy run out of a spare bedroom as it does for Procter & Gamble. *Credibility! In the end … Character Matters Most. Does he/she give their word, and then stick to it … come hell & high water? Can you rely on Her/Him in a pinch? Does she/he … CARE? *Grace. Is it “a pleasure to do business with you”? Is it a pleasure to “be a member of your team”?

88 GETTING TO YES … Roger Fisher, LEARNED OPTIMISM … Martin Seligman
Three for the Ages GETTING TO YES … Roger Fisher, William Ury, Bruce Patton LEARNED OPTIMISM … Martin Seligman CRUCIAL CONFRONTATIONS … Kerry Patterson, Joseph Grenny, Ron McMillan, Al Switzler

89 Brand You Tool #3: Presentation Excellence … The PresX56

90 “The problem with communication
“The problem with communication ...is the ILLUSION that it has been accomplished.” —George Bernard Shaw

91 Presentation Excellence 1
Presentation Excellence 1. Total commitment to the Problem/Project/Outcome 2. A compelling “Story line”/“Plot” 3. Enough data to sink a tanker (98% in reserve) 4. Know the data from memory; ability to manipulate the data in your head 5. Great Stories/Illustrations/Vignettes 6. Superb “political antennae” (you must “play the room” like a Virtuoso and be hyper-attentive to the likes of Body Language) 7. By hook or by crook … CONNECT 7A. CONNECT! CONNECT! CONNECT! 8. Punch line/Plot Outline/WOW/Surprise in first one to two minutes

92 Joe Kramer, welder: “When my mother’s toaster went on the fritz, I asked myself, ‘If I were that toaster and didn’t work, what would be wrong with me?’ ” —Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience, on “empathetic identification”* (Joe: “burdens” vs “opportunities” to master complex problems) (*BC vs JK)

93 Presentation Excellence 9
Presentation Excellence 9. Once you’ve “won” … stop pushing (don’t “rub it in”) 10. Be “in command” but don’t “show off” (if you’re brilliant they’ll figure it out for themselves) 11. Pay attention to the Senior Person present, but not too much (don’t look like/act like/be a “suck up”) 12. Brief the hell out of your “champions” before the presentation; insist that they make changes/fine tune ... they must “own” the outcome before the fact! 13. Don’t try to “score off” your detractors … be especially courteous to them (even if/especially if they’re jerks) 14. Adjust as you go: LET THE GROUP ARRIVE AT “YOUR” CONCLUSION! THEY MUST OWN IT (“I knew that”) IN THE END!

94 Presentation Excellence 15. No more than THREE key points
Presentation Excellence 15. No more than THREE key points! Come at them in several different ways. 16. No more than ONE point per slide! 17. Slides: NO CLUTTER!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! (no wee print/ charts/graphs) 18. Slides: Good quotes from the field. (Remember you’re “telling a story”) 19. Be aware of differing cognitive styles, especially M-F 20. There must be “surprise” … some key facts that are not commonly known/are counter-intuitive (no reason to do the presentation in the first place if there are no Surprises) 21. Summarize the argument/story from time to time 22. Include an Action Agenda that involves some small items that will be started/accomplished in the next 72 HOURS (this ices commitment/practicality)

95 Presentation Excellence 23. If you don’t know something … ADMIT IT
Presentation Excellence 23. If you don’t know something … ADMIT IT! (this is actually a good thing—as opposed to appearing as a “know it all”) 24. ASK FOR THE SALE! (Remember to be a “closer”) 25. This is War (a war for Hearts & Mind), but never forget that you are the Supplicant! 26. Data are imperative, but also play to Emotion Consider bringing along a “customer” (internal or perhaps external) for support 28. Be precisely clear where/when you intend to prototype … and that the prototype guinea pig is lined up (better yet, do the first, at least partial, prototype before the presentation) 29. Compromise but don’t yield! (Lost battles are normal, no matter how agonizing) 30. Assume that you may be cut off at any moment, and be prepared to give on the spot a compelling 30-second to one- minute (no longer!) Brilliant Summary including Sales Pitch

96 Presentation Excellence 31
Presentation Excellence 31. Follow the Law of Recency: Make sure that you have been in the field with the key “operating” players more recently than anyone in the room 32. Make it clear that you’ve done a Staggering Amount of Homework, even though you are exhibiting but a tiny fraction … allude to the tons of research that are available if desired by participants; offer deeper one-on-one briefings if desired 33. SMILE! RELAX (to a point) (fake it if necessary) (“up tight” is disastrous) (remember you are doing them a favor by sharing this Compelling Opportunity!) 34. EYE CONTACT!!!!!!! 35. Be shrewd: Override some interruptions; be attentive to others (distraction is okay and normal … within limits!) 36. Becoming an Excellent Presenter is as tough as becoming a great baseball pitcher. THIS IS IMPORTANT … and Presentation Excellence is never accidental! (Work your buns off!)

97 “The only reason to give a speech is to change the world.” —JFK

98 “If all my possessions were taken from me with one exception, I would choose to keep the power of speech, for by it I would regain all the rest.” —Daniel Webster

99 Presentation Excellence 37
Presentation Excellence 37. Practice … but don’t leave your game in the locker room. 38. Seek tips on how various participants “play the [presentation] game” 39. A Presentation is an Act (FDR: “The President must be the nation’s number one actor”) 40. Remember, the presentation is about Change … RESISTANCE IS NORMAL (in fact if there’s little resistance then your Project is hardly a “game changer”) 41. Dress well. Don’t over-dress. 42. Be early (obvious, but worth saying) 43. GET THE A/V RIGHT/PERFECT. 44. Don’t bring a supporting horde … a couple of back-ups is okay/enough 45. No matter how good you are you’ll have crappy days … WEEP AND THEN GET BACK ON THE HORSE

100 Presentation Excellence 46
Presentation Excellence 46. Speak in “Plain English” … keep the jargon to a minimum 47. Make your Personal Commitment clear as a bell! 48. Emphasize “competitive advantage” and timeliness (act now), without stooping to ridiculous war-like language (“tear the heart out of the competition”) (in audiences with heavy female component, if you are male, avoid repetitive “football analogues”) 49. Underscore the USP/Unique Selling Proposition 50. Emphasize the Positive 51. Sell Novelty yet “fit” with “core values” 52. Remember JFK’s immortal words: “The only reason to give a speech is to change the world”

101 Presentation Excellence 53
Presentation Excellence Say what you have to say Clearly … and then Say It Again & Again from slightly different angles 54. Make it clear that you are a Man/Woman of Action … and Execution Excellence is your First, Middle, and Last Name! 55. Energy! Enthusiasm! (don’t know the answer to, “If you ain’t got it how do you get it?”) 56. Enjoy it! This is a Hoot! THE ULTIMATE TURN ON! Remember your Goal: Change the world!

102 “In classical times when Cicero had finished speaking, the people said, ‘How well he spoke,’ but when Demosthenes had finished speaking, they said, ‘Let us march.’” —Adlai Stevenson

103 Let us march.

104 Brand You Tool #4: Interviewing Excellence … The IntX31

105 Interviewing Excellence 1. INTERVIEWING IS AN “ART” WORTH MASTERING
Interviewing Excellence 1. INTERVIEWING IS AN “ART” WORTH MASTERING! (Think Christiane Amanpour, Mike Wallace) 2. Don’t overschedule—2 or 3 in-depth interviews are a solid day’s work. (More than that is lunacy and will lead to shallow results.) 3. Save, if possible, the “Big Guy”/Gal until last—that is, until you know what the hell you’re doing! 4. Find a comfy/“safe”/neutral setting. THIS IS ALL IMPORTANT! (Worst case: You on the other side of his/her desk.) 5. Start with a little bit (LITTLE) of local small talk. But get some tips on the interviewee ahead of time; he may be one of the “brusque ones” who considers any small talk a waste of his Imperial Time. 6. DO YOUR DAMN HOME WORK! (On the interviewee, the subject matter.) 7. Concoct a … LONG LIST … of questions. (You’ll only use 10% of it, but that’s okay.)

106 Interviewing Excellence 8
Interviewing Excellence 8. Prepare a … SHORT LIST … of questions you must get answered. 9. Begin by briefly reviewing your assignment—why you’re here. 10. ALWAYS ASK FOR EXAMPLES! (When she says “Customer Service is in good shape,” you ask for specifics—hard data, recent Customer Service successes (and failures). And: PRECISELY WHO YOU CAN FOLLOW UP WITH TO GET MORE DETAIL. 11. STORIES! STORIES! STORIES! (You are in the “Story Collection Business.) 12. Dress well. DON’T OVERDRESS. (Look like they look, more or less; perhaps a touch more formal—this is a Serious Affair you are engaging in.) 13. Assume you’ll never get another chance to talk to this person. 14. Be personable, but more or less match the interviewee’s style. (THIS IS HARD WORK!) 15. THINK … SMALL! “Please walk me in great detail through the [complaint resolution] process. Here, let’s diagram it.”

107 Interviewing Excellence 16. For God’s sake, get to the Front Line
Interviewing Excellence 16. For God’s sake, get to the Front Line! (The devil is in the details, and the details are to be found on the loading dock at 3a.m.) (YES … 3A.M.) 17. Don’t quit until you understand. THE INTERVIEWEE ALWAYS TALKS IN SHORTHAND—using the jargon of the Corporate Culture. You’ve got to crack the code. (THIS IS ABOUT THE HARDEST THING TO DO, ESPECIALLY IF YOU ARE YOUNG AND UNCERTAIN: Tell yourself you are here to ask “Dumb” Questions—this is not a job interview. Again, think Mike Wallace: “So did you in fact murder Mrs. Smith?”) 18. Ignore generalizations! YOU ARE HERE IN SEARCH OF SPECIFICS!!! 19. CONTEXT! “Get” the “corporate culture”—e.g. Shell is not ExxonMobil! Find out (from a set of interviewees) “Core Values” (in theory and in practice).

108 Interviewing Excellence 20. Engage the Interviewee
Interviewing Excellence 20. Engage the Interviewee! GET HER TO DO SOME OF THE WORK! E.g., write out her view of the Ten Key Operative Core Values—or some such. 20A. ENGAGE! ENGAGE! ENGAGE! 21. You must come across as “trustworthy.” YOU ARE A DUMBO HERE TO LEARN—NOT AN FBI AGENT IN DISGUISE “Take me through yesterday.” Get past the theoretical crap. Give me in excruciating detail an average day: YESTERDAY! (One hour/meeting at a time.) 23. “If you’re comfortable, let’s go over your Calendar for the last month, so I can understand the flow of things.” (Remember TP’s Rule #1: YOU = YOUR CALENDAR.) 24. DON’T LET YOUR NOTES AGE!! Immediately after the interview set aside some time to do a “stream of consciousness” recap. And to clean up the obscure scrawl on your notes.

109 Interviewing Excellence 25
Interviewing Excellence 25. Ask the interview if you can get back to her by phone tomorrow to fill in holes that your tin ear missed. NO MORE THAN TEN MINUTES. 26. LEARNING! Tag along with “great interviewers” in your organization. (I made three PBS films with a Director who had been Mike Wallace’s director at 60 Minutes—oh my God, how much I learned—or, rather, how little I learned: He could drag stuff out of people that you couldn’t believe. (Secret: “I’m just a dumb old fart trying to figure out what goes on here. HELP ME. PLEASE.”) 27. “Work on” your Level of Dis-satisfaction: BE MAD AS HELL WHEN YOU SPENT 1.5 HOURS ON AN INTERVIEW WITHOUT REVALATIONS! 28. No, you’re not FBI—BUT YOU ARE HERE TO FERRET OUT THE NON-OBVIOUS. So: Keep Digging! (Think Woodward & Bernstein.)

110 Interviewing Excellence 29
Interviewing Excellence 29. Repeat: INTERVIEWING IS A CRUCIALLY IMPORTANT “ART.” Study it! Work on it! It’s no different than golf or underwater basket-weaving. The more & harder you work, the better you get Yes, we need “facts” (e.g., stories), but remember always: INTERVIEWS ARE PURE & SIMPLE ABOUT EMOTIONAL INTERACTION! 31. Tom Wrap-up Note: FEW THINGS IN LIFE PISS ME OFF MORE THAN GOING THROUGH SOMEONE’S INTERVIEW NOTES AND FINDING A DEARTH OF “SOLID EVIDENCE”—examples., stories, detailed process maps, etc. (I BLOODY HATE Generalizations!) (Think doctor’s office: Come hell & high water they start with weight, blood pressure, pulse.)

111 supreme skills (m.i.a.)

112 Talk. Listen.

113 bedrock behaviors

114 Home Run Being there. No more, no less
Home Run Being there! * ** *** **** *No more, no less **“A body can pretend to care, but they can’t pretend to be there.” — Texas Bix Bender *** GEN Melvin Zais on COs and inspections ****Silence is golden! [Utter silence is golden-er.]

115 Period! Shake hands Smile Eye contact

116 Period+! Shake hands Smile Eye contact Thank you Flowers Open pose ROIR

117 Period+! Shake hands Smile Eye contact Thank you Flowers Open pose ROIR

118 Grant+ Respect

119 *quote within a quote from diary of a Confederate soldier
“The [Union senior] officers rode past the Confederates smugly without any sign of recognition except by one. ‘When General Grant reached the line of ragged, filthy, bloody, despairing prisoners strung out on each side of the bridge, he lifted his hat and held it over his head until he passed the last man of that living funeral cortege. He was the only officer in that whole train who recognized us as being on the face of the earth.’*” *quote within a quote from diary of a Confederate soldier

120 Sara Lawrence-Lightfoot, Respect
“It was much later that I realized Dad’s secret. He gained respect by giving it. He talked and listened to the fourth-grade kids in Spring Valley who shined shoes the same way he talked and listened to a bishop or a college president. He was seriously interested in who you were and what you had to say.” Sara Lawrence-Lightfoot, Respect

121 “I wasn’t bowled over by [David Boies] intelligence
“I wasn’t bowled over by [David Boies] intelligence. … What impressed me was that when he asked a question, he waited for an answer. He not only listened, he made me feel like I was the only person in the room.” —Lawyer Kevin _____, on his first, inadvertent meeting with David Boies, from Marshall Goldsmith, “The One Skill That Separates,” Fast Company, 07.05

122 “What creates trust, in the end, is the leader’s manifest respect for the followers.” — Jim O’Toole, Leading Change

123 “Don’t belittle!” —OD Consultant

124 “The deepest human need is the need to be appreciated.” William James

125 “Ph.D. in leadership. Short course: Make a short list of all things done to you that you abhorred. Don’t do them to others. Ever. Make another list of things done to you that you loved. Do them to others. Always.” — Dee Hock

126 “We behaved as if we were guests in their house
“We behaved as if we were guests in their house. We treated them not as a defeated people, but as allies. Our success became their success.” —“How One Soldier Brought Democracy to Iraq: The Mayor of Ar Rutbah” (MAJ James Gavrilis/USA Special Forces)

127 Servant Leadership —Robert Greenleaf The Human Side of Enterprise
—Douglas McGregor The Manager’s Book of Decencies: How Small gestures Build Great Companies. —Steve Harrison Hostmanship: The Art of Making People Feel Welcome —Jan Gunnarsson and Olle Blohm The SPEED of Trust: The One Thing that Changes Everything —Stephen M.R. Covey and Rebecca Merrill The Dream Manager —Matthew Kelly The Customer Comes Second: Put Your People First and Watch ’em Kick Butt —Hal Rosenbluth and Diane McFerrin Peters

128 EXCELLENCE. MOTIVATIONAL STUFF.

129 “Do one thing every day that scares you.”
—Eleanor Roosevelt

130 “ARE YOU BEING REASONABLE
“ARE YOU BEING REASONABLE? Most people are reasonable; that’s why they only do reasonably well.” Source: Paul Arden, Whatever You Think Think the Opposite

131 Man and Superman: The Revolutionists' Handbook.
"The reasonable man adapts himself to the world. The unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore, all progress depends upon the unreasonable man.” —GB Shaw, Man and Superman: The Revolutionists' Handbook.

132 “If it’s not fun you’re not doing it right.” —Fran Tarkenton

133 “Success or Failure”/Try Instead “Optimism or Failure”/From Martin Seligman’s Learned Optimism: “I believe the traditional wisdom is incomplete. A composer can have all the talent of a Mozart and a passionate desire to succeed, but if he believes he cannot compose music, he will come to nothing. He will not try hard enough. He will give up too soon when the elusive right melody takes too long to materialize. Success requires persistence, the ability to not give up in the face of failure. I believe that … OPTIMISTIC EXPLANATORY STYLE … is the key to persistence. … The optimistic-explanatory-style theory of success says that in order to choose people for success in a challenging job, you need to select for three characteristics: (1) Aptitude. (2) Motivation. (3) Optimism. All three determine success.”

134 “The one thing you need to know about sustained individual success: Discover what you don’t like doing and stop doing it.” —Marcus Buckingham, The One Thing You Need to Know

135 “A year from now you may wish You had started today.” —Karen Lamb

136 EXCELLENCE. BEDROCK. TALENT.

137 Flash …

138 Flash … The Rich Get Richer

139 #1/100 “Best Companies to Work for”/2005

140 Wegmans

141 “I have always believed that the purpose of the corporation is to be a blessing to the employees.” —Boyd Clarke

142 TP: “How to piss away $500,000 in one easy lesson!!”

143 Clever “human resources” programs
that take into account the “new realities” concerning Gen X or Chinese competition or Web 2.0 are not the basis for creating “competitive advantage through an excellent workforce.” The “great secret” to “people excellence” is “treat people with manifest respect and appreciation and trust, and give them a chance to express the best in themselves and dramatically broaden their horizons”—and “the rest” will take care of itself for Gen A or Gen B or Gen X or Gen Boomer.

144 “Historically, smart people have always turned to where the money was
“Historically, smart people have always turned to where the money was. Today, money is turning to where the smart people are.” —FT/2003

145 “The Creative Age is a wide-open game
“The Creative Age is a wide-open game.” —Richard Florida, The Rise of the Creative Class

146 The Value-added Ladder/ OPPORTUNITY-SEEKING Implemented Gamechanging Solutions (People intensive) Services (People & Capital intensive) Goods (Capital intensive) Raw Materials (Capital intensive)

147 Creativity Index: The 3 T’s Technology (HT Index/firms & $$$, Innovation Index/patent growth) Talent (% with bachelors degrees+) Tolerance (Melting Pot Index/foreigners, Bohemian Index/artists et al., Gay Index/rel. #s) Source: Richard Florida, The Rise of the Creative Class

148 The Memphis Manifesto. : Building a Community of Ideas 1
The Memphis Manifesto*: Building a Community of Ideas 1. Cultivate & reward creativity. 2. Invest in the creative ecosystem. 3. Embrace diversity. 4. Nurture the creatives. 5. Value risk-taking. 6. Be authentic (emphasize uniqueness) 7. Invest in and build on quality of place. 8. Remove barriers to creativity. 9. Take responsibility for change. Development as D.I.Y. 10. Ensure that every person, especially children, has the right to creativity. Become a “Steward of creativity.” *2003/The Creative 100/Memphis Source: Richard Florida, The Rise of the Creative Class

149 “AS A DEVELOPING COUNTRY … YOU CAN LOWER INFLATION … REDUCE CORRUPTION … CUT YOUR BUDGET … PRIVATIZE … AND STILL NOT GET RICH. BECAUSE YOU ARE NOT GENERATING KNOWLEDGE … JUST PRODUCT. (North America, Western Europe, and Japan generated 84 percent of all scientific papers published during 1995.)” Source: Juan Enriquez/As the Future Catches You

150 “THE FUTURE BELONGS TO … SMALL POPULATIONS … WHO BUILD EMPIRES OF THE MIND … AND WHO IGNORE THE TEMPTATION OF—OR DO NOT HAVE THE OPTION OF—EXPLOITING NATURAL RESOURCES.” Source: Juan Enriquez/As the Future Catches You

151 Hire very good people!

152 “We believe companies can increase their market cap 50 percent in 3 years. Steve Macadam at Georgia-Pacific … changed 20 of his 40 box plant managers to put more talented, higher paid managers in charge. He increased profitability from $25 million to $80 million in 2 years.” —Ed Michaels, War for Talent

153 CtaO* *Chief talent acquisition Officer

154 CRO/Chief Recruiting Officer: #1 strategic issue in “commoditized” world, enormous financial services company. Agent turnover. 15% retention after 4 years. (Industry average is 11% … “because that’s the way it is” )

155 INVITE THEM TO JOIN US IN A JOURNEY TO EXCELLENCE!

156 “In the end, management doesn’t change culture
“In the end, management doesn’t change culture. Management invites the workforce itself to change the culture.” —Lou Gerstner

157 Organizing Genius / Warren Bennis and Patricia Ward Biederman “Groups become great only when everyone in them, leaders and members alike, is free to do his or her absolute best.” “The best thing a leader can do for a Great Group is to allow its members to discover their greatness.”

158 Leadership’s Mt Everest/Mt Excellence “free to do his or her absolute best” … “allow its members to discover their greatness.”

159 CQO* *Chief quest-meister

160 EMPHASIZE THE “SOFT SKILLS.”

161

162 “It’s simple, really, Tom. Hire for s, and, above all, promote for s
“It’s simple, really, Tom. Hire for s, and, above all, promote for s.” —Starbucks middle manager/field

163 “I can’t tell you how many times we passed up hotshots for guys we thought were better people, and watched our guys do a lot better than the big names, not just in the classroom, but on the field—and, naturally, after they graduated, too. Again and again, the blue chips faded out, and our little up-and-comers clawed their way to all-conference and All-America teams.” —Bo Schembechler (and John Bacon), “Recruit for Character,” Bo’s Lasting Lessons

164 A Few Lessons from the Arts Each hired and developed and evaluated in unique ways (23 contributors = 23 unique contributions = 23 pathways = 23 personalities = 23 sets of motivators) Attitude/Enthusiasm/Energy paramount Re-lent-less! “Practice is cool” (G Leonard/Mastery) Team and individual Aspire to EXCELLENCE = Obvious Ex-e-cu-tion Talent = Brand = Duh “The Project” rules Emotional language Bit players. No. B.I.W. (everything) Delta events = Delta rosters (incl leader/s)

165 Q: “If it were your $50K [life’s savings] and my $50K, what sort of Waiters would we look for?” A: “Enthusiasts!”

166 Diversity = profit

167 “Where do good new ideas come from. That’s simple. From differences
“Where do good new ideas come from? That’s simple! From differences. Creativity comes from unlikely juxtapositions. The best way to maximize differences is to mix ages, cultures and disciplines.” —Nicholas Negroponte

168 The Cracked Ones Let in the Light “Our business needs a massive transfusion of talent, and talent, I believe, is most likely to be found among non-conformists, dissenters and rebels.” —David Ogilvy

169 “Diversity defines the health and wealth of nations in a new century
“Diversity defines the health and wealth of nations in a new century. Mighty is the mongrel. The hybrid is hip. The impure, the mélange, the adulterated, the blemished, the rough, the black-and-blue, the mix-and-match – these people are inheriting the earth. Mixing is the new norm. Mixing trumps isolation. It spawns creativity, nourishes the human spirit, spurs economic growth and empowers nations.” —G. Pascal Zachary, The Global Me: New Cosmopolitans and the Competitive Edge

170 CM Prof Richard Florida on “Creative Capital”: “You cannot get a technologically innovative place unless it’s open to weirdness, eccentricity and difference.” Source: New York Times

171 Talent (Not) on His Mind Norman Pearlstine, Editor-in-Chief, Time Inc
Talent (Not) on His Mind Norman Pearlstine, Editor-in-Chief, Time Inc., asked a magazine’s managing editor to name 10 people outside Time that the magazine should pursue: “He said, ‘I can’t think of any.’ ” Source: New York Times

172 Build on strengths

173 “The key difference between checkers and chess is that in checkers the pieces all move the same way, whereas in chess all the pieces move differently. … Discover what is unique about each person and capitalize on it.” —Marcus Buckingham, The One Thing You Need to Know

174 “The mediocre manager believes that most things are learnable and therefore that the essence of management is to identify ach person’s weaker areas and eradicate them. The great manager believes the opposite. He believes that the most influential qualities of a person are innate and therefore that the essence of management is to deploy these innate qualities as effectively as possible and so drive performance.” —Marcus Buckingham, The One Thing You Need to Know

175 Bend Over Backwards to Retain Women!

176 “Forget China, India and the Internet: Economic Growth Is Driven by Women.” —Headline, Economist, April 15, 2006, Leader, page 14

177 “AS LEADERS, WOMEN RULE: New Studies find that female managers outshine their male counterparts in almost every measure” TITLE/ Special Report/ BusinessWeek

178 Women’s Strengths Match New Economy Imperatives: Link [rather than rank] workers; favor interactive-collaborative leadership style [empowerment beats top-down decision making]; sustain fruitful collaborations; comfortable with sharing information; see redistribution of power as victory, not surrender; favor multi-dimensional feedback; value technical & interpersonal skills, individual & group contributions equally; readily accept ambiguity; honor intuition as well as pure “rationality”; inherently flexible; appreciate cultural diversity. —Judy B. Rosener, America’s Competitive Secret: Women Managers

179 !!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 14 to 168* *Leadership Positions/D&T/ /WIAR (Women’s Initiative Annual Report)

180 “Winning the Talent War for Women: Sometimes It Takes a Revolution” —Douglas McCracken, HBR, Article title

181 Elizabeth Cady Stanton
(more or less) (circa ) web

182 Period. Start: 3 0f 14 18 months later: 10 of 18 (“deep dip”. )
Period??!!* Start: 3 0f months later: 10 of 18 (“deep dip”!) *AIM/September 2007

183 53 = 53

184 Just say “No”! 184

185 Just scream “No”! 185

186 Promise #1: “Never, ever again will I evaluate anyone using a standardized instrument devised by a “professional” in inhuman Resources.” 186

187 53 = 53 187

188 One size … NEVER … fits all.
188

189 Arts/??? V.P.s/??? Nobel Prizes/??? Our spouse/??? Our children/???

190 Arts/. Athletics/. Dentists/. Surgeons/. V. P. s/. Ph. D. s/
Arts/??? Athletics/??? Dentists/??? Surgeons/??? V.P.s/??? Ph.D.s/??? Nobel Prizes/??? Our children/??? Elected officials/??? 190

191 NEVER … ever … ever ……. ever … ever … ever … ever … ever … ever … EVER … ever … ever … ever …
191

192 Horror #1 in the “Creative Age” : T3/ Teach to Test
192

193 “The Creative Age is a wide-open game
“The Creative Age is a wide-open game.” —Richard Florida, The Rise of the Creative Class 193

194 SO YOU’RE A “PEOPLE PERSON”? PROVE IT.

195 “The leaders of Great Groups love talent and know where to find it
“The leaders of Great Groups love talent and know where to find it. They revel in the talent of others.” —Warren Bennis & Patricia Ward Biederman, Organizing Genius

196 PARC’s Bob Taylor: “Connoisseur of Talent”

197 SO YOU’RE A “PEOPLE PERSON”? PROVE IT.

198 “The leaders of Great Groups love talent and know where to find it
“The leaders of Great Groups love talent and know where to find it. They revel in the talent of others.” —Warren Bennis & Patricia Ward Biederman, Organizing Genius

199 “We are a ‘Life Success’ Company.” Dave Liniger, founder, RE/MAX

200 “No matter what the situation, [the great manager’s] first response is always to think about the individual concerned and how things can be arranged to help that individual experience success.” —Marcus Buckingham, The One Thing You Need to Know

201 “Do” TALENT!

202 Les Wexner: From sweaters to … people!

203 “Things don’t stay the same
“Things don’t stay the same. You have to understand that not only your business situation changes, but the people you’re working with aren’t the same day to day. Someone is sick. Someone is having a wedding. [You must] gauge the mood, the thinking level of the team that day.” —Coach K [Krzyzewski]

204 220 workdays = 220 “rosters” Source: Coach K

205 new goal … every game! Source: Coach K

206 “The key difference between checkers and chess is that in checkers the pieces all move the same way, whereas in chess all the pieces move differently. … Discover what is unique about each person and capitalize on it.” —Marcus Buckingham, The One Thing You Need to Know

207 SO YOU’RE A “PEOPLE PERSON”? PROVE IT.

208 < CAPEX > People!

209 TP: “How to piss away $500,000 in one easy lesson!!”

210 SO YOU’RE A “PEOPLE PERSON”? PROVE IT.

211 PUT HR AT THE HEAD OF THE HEAD TABLE. BEST PEOPLE. NOBLEST MISSION.

212 Second: Putting HR on a par with finance and marketing.
A review of Jack and Suzy Welch’s Winning claims there are but two key differentiators that set GE “culture” apart from the herd: First: Separating financial forecasting and performance measurement. Performance measurement based, as it usually is, on budgeting leads to an epidemic of gaming the system. GE’s performance measurement is divorced from budgeting—and instead reflects how you do relative to your past performance and relative to competitors’ performance; i.e., it’s about how you actually do in the context of what happened in the real world, not as compared to a gamed-abstract plan developed last year. Second: Putting HR on a par with finance and marketing.

213 LIVE FOR TALENT!

214 Our Mission To develop and manage talent; to apply that talent, throughout the world, for the benefit of clients; to do so in partnership; to do so with profit. WPP

215 Omnicom's acquisitions: “not for size per se”; “buying talent;” “deepen a relationship with a client.” (Advertising Age) “Omnicom very simply is about talent. It’s about the acquisition of talent, providing the atmosphere so talent is attracted to it.” (John Wren)

216 Internal “brand promise”!

217 What’s your company’s … EVP/ IBP
What’s your company’s … EVP/ IBP?* *Employee Value Proposition, per Ed Michaels et al., The War for Talent; IBP/Internal Brand Promise per TP

218 EVP/IBP = Remarkable challenge, rapid professional growth, respect, satisfaction, fun, stunning opportunity, exceptional reward, amazing peer group, full membership in Club Adventure, maximized future employability Source: Ed Michaels, The War for Talent; TP

219 Words Matter.

220 Talent Department

221 People Department Center for Talent Excellence Seriously Cool People Who Recruit & Develop Seriously Cool People Etc.

222 Brand = Talent.

223 “I have always believed that the purpose of the corporation is to be a blessing to the employees.” —Boyd Clarke

224 Re-imagine People Power: The Talent50

225 The Talent50 1. People first. 2. Soft is Hard. 3
The Talent People first! 2. Soft is Hard. 3. FUNDAMENTAL PREMISE: We are in an Age of Talent/ Creativity/Intellectual- capital Added. 4. Talent “excellence” in every part of the organization. 5. P.O.T./Pursuit Of Talent = Obsession. 6. HR sits at The Head Table. 7. HR is “cool.”

226 The Talent Re-name “HR.” (Talent Department, Center of Talent Excellence) 9. There’s an HR Strategy 10. There is a FORMAL Recruitment Strategy. 11. There is a FORMAL Leadership Development Strategy. 12. There is a “world class” Leadership Development Center. 13. There is a FORMAL-STRATEGIC HR Review Process. 14. The “Top100,” and every unit’s Top10, are consciously managed.

227 The Talent50 15. “People/Talent Reviews” are the FIRST reviews. 16
The Talent “People/Talent Reviews” are the FIRST reviews. 16. HR Strategy = Business Strategy. 17. Make it a Cause Worth Signing Up For Set Sky High Standards. 19. Enlist everyone in Challenge Century Pursue the Best! 21. Up or Out. 22. Ensure that the Review Process has INTEGRITY. 23. Pay!

228 The Talent50 24. Training I: Train. Train. Train. 25
The Talent Training I: Train! Train! Train! 25. TII: 100% “business people.” 26. TIII: 100% Leaders. 27. TIV: Boss as Trainer-in-Chief. 28. Open Communication I: NO BARRIERS. 29. Open Communication II: Share Information. (ALL!) 30. Respect! 31. INTEGRITY! 32. Treat the Whole Individual.

229 The Talent50 33. Places of “grace. ” 34. MBWA: The “Rudy Rule. ” 35
The Talent Places of “grace.” 34. MBWA: The “Rudy Rule.” 35. Thank You! 36. Promote for “people skills.” (ALL ELSE IS SECONDARY.) 37. Honor youth. 38. Early leadership assignments. 39. Fast Tracking is the norm. 40. Create a System of Mentoring.

230 The Talent Diversity! 42. Diversity starts on the Board of Directors. 43. WOMEN RULE. 44. Weird Wins. 45. We are all unique Bosses “win people over.” 47. GOAL: Adventures of Mutual Discovery. 48. Foster Independence. 49. Enthusiasm!

231 50. Talent = Brand.

232 Talent50

233 Tom Peters’ X25. EXCELLENCE. ALWAYS. Talent. Mauritius/24 May 2007
Tom Peters’ X25* EXCELLENCE. ALWAYS. Talent. Mauritius/24 May *In Search of Excellence

234 People Power: The Talent50

235 1. People First!

236 Whoops: Jack didn’t have a vision!* *GE = “Talent Machine” (Ed Michaels)

237 “Omnicom very simply is about talent
“Omnicom very simply is about talent. It’s about the acquisition of talent, providing the atmosphere so talent is attracted to it.” —John Wren

238 < CAPEX > People!

239 2. “Soft” Is “Hard.”

240 Excellence1982: The Bedrock “Eight Basics”
1. A Bias for Action 2. Close to the Customer 3. Autonomy and Entrepreneurship 4. Productivity Through People 5. Hands On, Value-Driven 6. Stick to the Knitting 7. Simple Form, Lean Staff 8. Simultaneous Loose-Tight Properties”

241 3. FUNDAMENTAL PREMISE: We Are in an Age of Talent/ Creativity/ Intellectual-capital Added.

242 Agriculture Age (farmers) Industrial Age (factory workers) Information Age (knowledge workers) Conceptual Age (creators and empathizers) Source: Dan Pink, A Whole New Mind

243 “Human creativity is the ultimate economic resource
“Human creativity is the ultimate economic resource.” —Richard Florida, The Rise of the Creative Class

244 “The Creative Age is a wide open game
“The Creative Age is a wide open game.” —Richard Florida, The Rise of the Creative Class

245 “THE FUTURE BELONGS TO … SMALL POPULATIONS … WHO BUILD EMPIRES OF THE MIND … AND WHO IGNORE THE TEMPTATION OF—OR DO NOT HAVE THE OPTION OF—EXPLOITING NATURAL RESOURCES.” Source: Juan Enriquez/As the Future Catches You

246 4. Talent “Excellence” in Every Part of Every Organization.

247 Wegmans: #1/100 “Best Companies to Work for”/2005

248 5. Talent “Excellence” Stretches Far Beyond Our Borders.

249 We become who we hang out with 1

250 Measure “Strangeness”/Portfolio Quality Staff Consultants Vendors Out-sourcing Partners (#, Quality) Innovation Alliance Partners Customers Competitors (who we “benchmark” against) Strategic Initiatives Product Portfolio (LineEx v. Leap) IS/IT Projects HQ Location Lunch Mates Language Board

251 6. P.O.T./ Pursuit Of Talent = OBSESSION.

252 “The leaders of Great Groups love talent and know where to find it
“The leaders of Great Groups love talent and know where to find it. They revel in the talent of others.” —Warren Bennis & Patricia Ward Biederman, Organizing Genius

253 7. Talent Masters Understand Talent’s Intangibles.

254 A Few Lessons from the Arts Each hired and developed and evaluated in unique ways (23 contributors = 23 unique contributions = 23 pathways = 23 personalities = 23 sets of motivators) Attitude/Enthusiasm/Energy paramount Re-lent-less! “Practice is cool” (G Leonard/Mastery) Team and individual Aspire to EXCELLENCE = Obvious Ex-e-cu-tion Talent = Brand = Duh “The Project” rules Emotional language Bit players. No. B.I.W. (everything) Delta events = Delta rosters (incl leader/s)

255 Visibly energetic /Passionate/Enthusiastic … about everything
Visibly energetic /Passionate/Enthusiastic … about everything. Engaging/Inspires others. (Inspires the interviewer!) Loves messes & pressure. Impatient/ Action fanatic. A finisher. Exhibits: Fat “WOW Project” Portfolio. (Loves to talk about her work.) Smart. Curious/ Eclectic interests/A little (or more) weird. Well-developed sense of humor/ Fun to be around. ****** No. 1 re bosses: Exceptional talent selection & development record. (Former co-workers: “Did you visibly grow while working with X?” /“How has the department/team grown on a ‘world-class’ scale during X’s tenure?”)

256 8. HR Is “Cool.”

257 Chicago: HRMAC

258 “support function” / “cost center” / “bureaucratic drag” or …

259 Are you … “Rock Stars of the Age of Talent”?

260 9. HR Sits at The Head Table.

261 “HR doesn’t tend to hire a lot of independent thinkers or people who stand up as moral compasses.” —Garold Markle, Shell Offshore HR Exec (FC/08.05)

262 Second: Putting HR on a par with finance and marketing.
A review of Jack and Suzy Welch’s Winning claims there are but two key differentiators that set GE “culture” apart from the herd: First: Separating financial forecasting and performance measurement. Performance measurement based, as it usually is, on budgeting leads to an epidemic of gaming the system. GE’s performance measurement is divorced from budgeting—and instead reflects how you do relative to your past performance and relative to competitors’ performance; i.e., it’s about how you actually do in the context of what happened in the real world, not as compared to a gamed-abstract plan developed last year. Second: Putting HR on a par with finance and marketing.

263 10. Re-name “HR.”

264 Talent Department

265 “H.R.” to “H.E.D.” ??? Human Enablement Department

266 People Department Center for Talent Excellence Seriously Cool People Who Recruit & Develop Seriously Cool People Etc.

267 11. There Is an “HR Strategy”/ “HR Vision”

268 What’s your company’s … EVP/ IBP
What’s your company’s … EVP/ IBP?* *Employee Value Proposition, per Ed Michaels et al., The War for Talent; IBP/Internal Brand Promise per TP

269 EVP/IBP = Remarkable challenge, rapid professional growth, respect, satisfaction, fun, stunning opportunity, exceptional reward, amazing peer group, full membership in Club Adventure, maximized future employability Source: Ed Michaels, The War for Talent; TP

270 12. Acquire for Talent!

271 Omnicom's acquisitions: “not for size per se”; “buying talent;” “deepen a relationship with a client.” Source: Advertising Age

272 13. There Is a FORMAL Recruitment Strategy.

273 “Busy Executives Fail To Give Recruiting Attention It Deserves” —Headline, WSJ, 1121.05

274 CtaO* *Chief talent acquisition Officer

275 14. There Is a FORMAL Leadership Development Strategy.

276 Crotonville!

277 DD: 0 to 60mph in a flash (months)

278 15. There Is a FORMAL STRATEGIC HR Review Process.

279 “In most companies, the Talent Review Process is a farce
“In most companies, the Talent Review Process is a farce. At GE, Jack Welch and his two top HR people visit each division for a day. They review the top 20 to 50 people by name. They talk about Talent Pool strengthening issues. The Talent Review Process is a contact sport at GE; it has the intensity and the importance of the budget process at most companies.”—Ed Michaels

280 16. “People”/ Talent” Reviews Are the FIRST Reviews.

281 17. HR Strategy = BUSINESS Strategy.

282 Wegmans: #1/100 Best Companies to Work for 84%: Grocery stores “are all alike” 46%: additional spend if customers have an “emotional connection” to a grocery store rather than “are satisfied” (Gallup) “Going to Wegmans is not just shopping, it’s an event.” —Christopher Hoyt, grocery consultant “You cannot separate their strategy as a retailer from their strategy as an employer.” —Darrell Rigby, Bain & Co.

283 Cirque du Soleil!

284 Cirque du Soleil: Talent (12 full-time scouts, database of 20,000)
Cirque du Soleil: Talent (12 full-time scouts, database of 20,000). R&D (40% of profits; 2X avg corp). Controls (shows are profit centers; partners like Disney offset costs; $100M on $500M). Scarcity builds buzz/brand (1 new show per year. “People tell me we’re leaving money on the table by not duplicating our shows. They’re right.” —Daniel Lamarre, president). Source: “The Phantasmagoria Factory”/Business 2.0

285 18. Make it a “Cause Worth Signing Up For.”

286 G.H.: “Create a ‘cause,’ not a ‘business.’ ”

287 19. Unleash “Their” Full Potential!

288 “We are a ‘Life Success’ Company.” Dave Liniger, founder, RE/MAX

289 “No matter what the situation, [the great manager’s] first response is always to think about the individual concerned and how things can be arranged to help that individual experience success.” —Marcus Buckingham, The One Thing You Need to Know

290 “Firms will not ‘manage the careers’ of their employees
“Firms will not ‘manage the careers’ of their employees. They will provide opportunities to enable the employee to develop identity and adaptability and thus be in charge of his or her own career.” —Tim Hall et al., “The New Protean Career Contract”

291 20. Set Sky High Standards.

292 “The role of the Director is to create a space where the actors and actresses can become more than they’ve ever been before, more than they’ve dreamed of being.” —Robert Altman, Oscar acceptance speech

293 21. Enlist Everyone in Challenge Century21.

294 “One of the defining characteristics [of the change] is that it will be less driven by countries or corporations and more driven by real people. It will unleash unprecedented creativity, advancement of knowledge, and economic development. But at the same time, it will tend to undermine safety net systems and penalize the unskilled.” —Clyde Prestowitz, Three Billion New Capitalists

295 “If there is nothing very special about your work, no matter how hard you apply yourself you won’t get noticed, and that increasingly means you won’t get paid much either.” —Michael Goldhaber, Wired

296 Distinct … or … Extinct

297 22. Pursue the Best!

298 From “1, 2 or you’re out” [JW] to … “Best Talent in each industry segment to build best proprietary intangibles” [EM] Source: Ed Michaels, War for Talent

299 Did We Say “Talent Matters”
Did We Say “Talent Matters”? “The top software developers are more productive than average software developers not by a factor of 10X or 100X, or even 1,000X, but 10,000X.” —Nathan Myhrvold, former Chief Scientist, Microsoft

300 23. Up or Out.

301 “We believe companies can increase their market cap 50 percent in 3 years. Steve Macadam at Georgia-Pacific … changed 20 of his 40 box plant managers to put more talented, higher paid managers in charge. He increased profitability from $25 million to $80 million in 2 years.” —Ed Michaels, War for Talent

302 24. Ensure that the Review Process Has INTEGRITY.

303 25 = 100* * “But what do I do that’s more important than developing people? I don’t do the damn work. They do.”—GK

304 25. Pay Up!

305 “Top performing companies are two to four times more likely than the rest to pay what it takes to prevent losing top performers.” —Ed Michaels, War for Talent

306 Costco *$17/hour (42% above Sam’s); very good health plan; low t/o, low shrinkage *Low margins (“When I started, Sears, Roebuck was the Costco of the country, but they allowed someone to come in under them.”—Jim Sinegal) Source: “How Costco Became the Anti-Wal*Mart”/NYT/

307 26. Training I: Train! Train! Train!

308 26.3

309 Divas do it. Violinists do it. Sprinters do it. Golfers do it
Divas do it. Violinists do it. Sprinters do it. Golfers do it. Pilots do it. Soldiers do it. Surgeons do it. Cops do it. Astronauts do it. Why don’t businesspeople do it?

310 “Knowledge becomes obsolete incredibly fast
“Knowledge becomes obsolete incredibly fast. The continuing professional education of adults is the No. 1 industry in the next 30 years … mostly on line.” Peter Drucker, Business 2.0 This portends a cradle-to-grave education revolution, for which the school system … call it K-80 … is hardly prepared. [Corporations are currently doing a better job – and experimenting more vigorously - at all aspects of education than the public sector.]

311 27. Training II: 100% “Business People.”

312 New Work SurvivalKit.2007 1. MASTERY! (Best/Absurdly Good at Something!) 2. “Manage” to Legacy (All Work = “Memorable”/“Braggable” WOW Projects!) 3. A “USP”/UNIQUE SELLING PROPOSITION 4. Rolodex Obsession (From vertical/hierarchy/“suck up” loyalty to horizontal/“colleague”/“mate” loyalty) 5. ENTREPRENEURIAL INSTINCT (A sleepless … Eye for Opportunity! 6.CEO/LEADER/BUSINESSPERSON/CLOSER (CEO, Me Inc. 24/7!) 7. Master of Improv (Play a dozen parts simultaneously, from Chief Strategist to Chief Toilet Scrubber) 8. Sense of Humor (A willingness to Screw Up & Move On) 9. Comfortable with Your Skin (Bring “interesting you” to work!) 10. Intense Appetite for Technology (E.g.: How Cool-Active is your Web site? Do you Blog?) 11. EMBRACE “MARKETING” (Your own CSO/Chief Storytelling Officer) 12. PASSION FOR RENEWAL (Your own CLO/Chief Learning Officer) 13. EXECUTION EXCELLENCE! (Show up on time! Leave last!)

313 28. Training III: 100% LEADERS.

314 “I start with the premise that the function of leadership is to produce more leaders, not more followers.” —Ralph Nader

315 29. Training IV: Boss as Trainer-in-Chief.

316 “Workout” = 24 DPY in the Classroom

317 30. Training V: The REAL Bedrock of the “Talent Thing.”

318 “My wife and I went to a [kindergarten] parent-teacher conference and were informed that our budding refrigerator artist, Christopher, would be receiving a grade of Unsatisfactory in art. We were shocked. How could any child—let alone our child—receive a poor grade in art at such a young age? His teacher informed us that he had refused to color within the lines, which was a state requirement for demonstrating ‘grade-level motor skills.’ ” —Jordan Ayan, AHA!

319 15 “Leading” Biz Schools Design/Core: 0 Design/Elective: 1 Creativity/Core: 0 Creativity/Elective: 4 Innovation/Core: 0 Innovation/Elective: 6 Source: DMI/Summer 2002/Research by Thomas Lockwood

320 31. Wide-open Communication: NO BARRIERS.

321 “The organizations we created have become tyrants
“The organizations we created have become tyrants. They have taken control, holding us fettered, creating barriers that hinder rather than help our businesses. The lines that we drew on our neat organizational diagrams have turned into walls that no one can scale or penetrate or even peer over.” —Frank Lekanne Deprez & René Tissen, Zero Space: Moving Beyond Organizational Limits

322 32. RESPECT!

323 Sara Lawrence-Lightfoot, Respect
“It was much later that I realized Dad’s secret. He gained respect by giving it. He talked and listened to the fourth-grade kids in Spring Valley who shined shoes the same way he talked and listened to a bishop or a college president. He was seriously interested in who you were and what you had to say.” Sara Lawrence-Lightfoot, Respect

324 “What creates trust, in the end, is the leader’s manifest respect for the followers.” — Jim O’Toole, Leading Change

325 “Don’t belittle!” —OD Consultant

326 33. Embrace the Whole Individual.

327 34. Build Places of “Grace.”

328 Rodale’s on “Grace” … elegance … charm … loveliness … poetry in motion … kindliness ... benevolence … benefaction … compassion … beauty

329 The Manager’s Book of Decencies: How Small gestures Build Great Companies. —Steve Harrison, Adecco
Servant Leadership —Robert Greenleaf One: The Art and Practice of Conscious Leadership —Lance Secretan, founder of Manpower, Inc.

330 “Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a great battle
“Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a great battle.” —Philo of Alexandria

331 35. MBWA: Visible Leadership!

332 MBWA* *5,000 miles for a 5-minute face-to -face meeting (courtesy super- agent Mark McCormick)

333 36. Thank You!

334 “The deepest human need is the need to be appreciated.” William James

335 “Courtesies of a small and trivial character are the ones which strike deepest in the grateful and appreciating heart.” —Henry Clay

336 37. Promote for “people skills.” (THE REST IS DETAILS.)

337 “When assessing candidates, the first thing I looked for was energy and enthusiasm for execution. Does she talk about the thrill of getting things done, the obstacles overcome, the role her people played —or does she keep wandering back to strategy or philosophy?” —Larry Bossidy, Honeywell/AlliedSignal, in Execution

338 38. Honor Youth.

339 “Why focus on these late teens and twenty-somethings
“Why focus on these late teens and twenty-somethings? Because they are the first young who are both in a position to change the world, and are actually doing so. … For the first time in history, children are more comfortable, knowledgeable and literate than their parents about an innovation central to society. … The Internet has triggered the first industrial revolution in history to be led by the young.” The Economist

340 39. Provide Early Leadership Assignments.

341 The WOW! Project

342 40. Create a FORMAL System of Mentoring.

343 W. L. Gore Quad/Graphics

344 41. Diversity!

345 CM Prof Richard Florida on “Creative Capital”: “You cannot get a technologically innovative place … unless it’s open to weirdness, eccentricity and difference.” Source: New York Times/

346 “Diverse groups of problem solvers—groups of people with diverse tools—consistently outperformed groups of the best and the brightest. If I formed two groups, one random (and therefore diverse) and one consisting of the best individual performers, the first group almost always did better. … Diversity trumped ability.” —Scott Page, The Difference: How the Power of Diversity Creates Better Groups, Firms, Schools, and Societies Diversity

347 “The Bottleneck Is at the Top of the Bottle” “Where are you likely to find people with the least diversity of experience, the largest investment in the past, and the greatest reverence for industry dogma: At the top!” — Gary Hamel/Harvard Business Review

348 42. WOMEN RULE.

349 Women’s Strengths Match New Economy Imperatives: Link [rather than rank] workers; favor interactive-collaborative leadership style [empowerment beats top-down decision making]; sustain fruitful collaborations; comfortable with sharing information; see redistribution of power as victory, not surrender; favor multi-dimensional feedback; value technical & interpersonal skills, individual & group contributions equally; readily accept ambiguity; honor intuition as well as pure “rationality”; inherently flexible; appreciate cultural diversity. —Judy B. Rosener, America’s Competitive Secret

350 43. Hire (& Protect!) Weird!

351 “Are there enough weird people in the lab these days. ” —V. Chmn
“Are there enough weird people in the lab these days?” —V. Chmn., pharmaceutical house, to a lab director

352 Why Do I love Freaks? (1) Because when Anything Interesting happens … it was a freak who did it. (Period.) (2) Freaks are fun. (Freaks are also a pain.) (Freaks are never boring.) (3) We need freaks. Especially in freaky times. (Hint: These are freaky times, for you & me & the CIA & the Army & Avon.) (4) A critical mass of freaks-in-our-midst automatically make us-who-are-not-so-freaky at least somewhat more freaky. (Which is a Good Thing in freaky times—see immediately above.) (5) Freaks are the only (ONLY) ones who succeed—as in, make it into the history books. (6) Freaks keep us from falling into ruts. (If we listen to them.) (We seldom listen to them.) (Which is why most organizations are in ruts. Make that chasms.)

353 44. We Are All Unique.

354 Beware Standardized Evals: One size NEVER fits all. One size fits one
Beware Standardized Evals: One size NEVER fits all. One size fits one. Period.

355 53 Players = 53 Projects = 53 different success measures.

356 45. Capitalize on Strengths.

357 “The key difference between checkers and chess is that in checkers the pieces all move the same way, whereas in chess all the pieces move differently. … Discover what is unique about each person and capitalize on it.” —Marcus Buckingham, The One Thing You Need to Know

358 “The mediocre manager believes that most things are learnable and therefore that the essence of management is to identify ach person’s weaker areas and eradicate them. The great manager believes the opposite. He believes that the most influential qualities of a person are innate and therefore that the essence of management is to deploy these innate qualities as effectively as possible and so drive performance.” —Marcus Buckingham, The One Thing You Need to Know

359 46. Bosses “Win People Over.”

360 PJ: “Coaching is winning players over.”

361 47. GOAL: Voyages of Mutual Discovery.

362 Quests!

363 “The organization would ultimately win not because it gave agents more money, but because it gave them a chance for better lives.” —Everybody Wins, Phil Harkins & Keith Hollihan

364 CQO* *Chief quest-meister

365 48. Foster Independence.

366 “You must realize that how you invest your human capital matters as much as how you invest your financial capital. Its rate of return determines your future options. Take a job for what it teaches you, not for what it pays. Instead of a potential employer asking, ‘Where do you see yourself in 5 years?’ you’ll ask, ‘If I invest my mental assets with you for 5 years, how much will they appreciate? How much will my portfolio of career options grow?’ ” Source: Stan Davis & Christopher Meyer, futureWEALTH

367 49. En-thus-i-asm!

368 “I am a dispenser of enthusiasm.” —Ben Zander

369 50. Talent = Brand.

370 The Top 5 “Revelations” Better talent wins
The Top 5 “Revelations” Better talent wins. Talent management is my job as leader. Talented leaders are looking for the moon and stars. Over-deliver on people’s dreams – they are volunteers. Pump talent in at all levels, from all conceivable sources, all the time. Source: Ed Michaels et al., The War for Talent

371 BRAND = TALENT.

372 “I have always believed that the purpose of the corporation is to be a blessing to the employees.” —Boyd Clarke

373 EXCELLE ALWAYS. THE.END.

374 EXCELLENCE. WOMEN. RULE.

375 “AS LEADERS, WOMEN RULE: New Studies find that female managers outshine their male counterparts in almost every measure” TITLE/ Special Report/ BusinessWeek

376 So what exactly is the point of men?
10 UNASSAILABLE REASONS WOMEN RULE Women make [all] the financial decisions. Women control [all] the wealth. Women [substantially] outlive men. Women start most of the new businesses. Women’s work force participation rates have soared worldwide. Women are closing in on “same pay for same job.” Women are penetrating senior ranks rapidly [even if the pace is slow for the corner office per se]. Women’s leadership strengths are exceptionally well aligned with new organizational effectiveness imperatives. Women are better salespersons than men. Women buy [almost] everything—commercial as well as consumer goods. So what exactly is the point of men?

377 EXCELLENCE. AWOL. THE SCHOOLS FIASCO. K-12.

378 J. D. Rockefeller’s General Education Board (1915): “In our dreams people yield themselves with perfect docility to our molding hands. … The task is simple. We will organize children and teach them in a perfect way the things their fathers and mothers are doing in an imperfect way.” John Taylor Gatto, A Different Kind of Teacher

379 Or Is It Mike Who’s Crazy
Or Is It Mike Who’s Crazy? “Isn’t it crazy that your child is learning different material and being held to a different standard than, say, your sister’ children in another state?” —Mike Petrilli, Fordham Institute (U.S. News & World Report, )

380 “The main crisis in school today is irrelevance
“The main crisis in school today is irrelevance.” —Daniel Pink, Free Agent Nation

381 “The Creative Age is a wide-open game
“The Creative Age is a wide-open game.” —Richard Florida, The Rise of the Creative Class

382 “Human creativity is the ultimate economic resource
“Human creativity is the ultimate economic resource.” —Richard Florida, The Rise of the Creative Class

383 Creativity Index: The 3 T’s Technology (HT Index/firms & $$$, Innovation Index/patent growth) Talent (% with bachelors degrees+) Tolerance (Melting Pot Index/foreigners, Bohemian Index/artists et al., Gay Index/rel. #s) Source: Richard Florida, The Rise of the Creative Class

384 The Memphis Manifesto. : Building a Community of Ideas 1
The Memphis Manifesto*: Building a Community of Ideas 1. Cultivate & reward creativity. 2. Invest in the creative ecosystem. 3. Embrace diversity. 4. Nurture the creatives. 5. Value risk-taking. 6. Be authentic (emphasize uniqueness) 7. Invest in and build on quality of place. 8. Remove barriers to creativity. 9. Take responsibility for change. Development as D.I.Y. 10. Ensure that every person, especially children, has the right to creativity. Become a “Steward of creativity.” *2003/The Creative 100/Memphis Source: Richard Florida, The Rise of the Creative Class

385 “THE FUTURE BELONGS TO … SMALL POPULATIONS … WHO BUILD EMPIRES OF THE MIND … AND WHO IGNORE THE TEMPTATION OF—OR DO NOT HAVE THE OPTION OF—EXPLOITING NATURAL RESOURCES.” Source: Juan Enriquez/As the Future Catches You

386 “AS A DEVELOPING COUNTRY … YOU CAN LOWER INFLATION … REDUCE CORRUPTION … CUT YOUR BUDGET … PRIVATIZE … AND STILL NOT GET RICH. BECAUSE YOU ARE NOT GENERATING KNOWLEDGE … JUST PRODUCT. (North America, Western Europe, and Japan generated 84 percent of all scientific papers published during 1995.)” Source: Juan Enriquez/As the Future Catches You

387 “Every child is born an artist. The trick is to remain an artist
“Every child is born an artist. The trick is to remain an artist.” —Picasso

388 “My wife and I went to a [kindergarten] parent-teacher conference and were informed that our budding refrigerator artist, Christopher, would be receiving a grade of Unsatisfactory in art. We were shocked. How could any child—let alone our child—receive a poor grade in art at such a young age? His teacher informed us that he had refused to color within the lines, which was a state requirement for demonstrating ‘grade-level motor skills.’ ” —Jordan Ayan, AHA!

389 “How many artists are there in the room
“How many artists are there in the room? Would you please raise your hands. FIRST GRADE: En mass the children leapt from their seats, arms waving. Every child was an artist. SECOND GRADE: About half the kids raised their hands, shoulder high, no higher. The hands were still. THIRD GRADE: At best, 10 kids out of 30 would raise a hand, tentatively, self-consciously. By the time I reached SIXTH GRADE, no more than one or two kids raised their hands, and then ever so slightly, betraying a fear of being identified by the group as a ‘closet artist.’ The point is: Every school I visited was participating in the systematic suppression of creative genius.” Source: Gordon MacKenzie, Orbiting the Giant Hairball

390 “Every child is born an artist. The trick is to remain an artist
“Every child is born an artist. The trick is to remain an artist.” —Picasso

391 “Our schools are not teaching people how to think
“Our schools are not teaching people how to think.” —Thomas Edison “It is nothing short of a miracle that modern methods of instruction have not yet entirely strangled the holy curiosity of inquiry.” —Albert Einstein

392 “The key question isn’t ‘What fosters creativity
“The key question isn’t ‘What fosters creativity?’ But it is why in God’s name isn’t everyone creative? Where was the human potential lost? How was it crippled? I think therefore a good question might be not why do people create? But why do people not create or innovate? We have got to abandon that sense of amazement in the face of creativity, as if it were a miracle if anybody created anything.” —Abe Maslow

393 Ye gads: “Thomas Stanley has not only found no correlation between success in school and an ability to accumulate wealth, he’s actually found a negative correlation. ‘It seems that school-related evaluations are poor predictors of economic success,’ Stanley concluded. What did predict success was a willingness to take risks. Yet the success-failure standards of most schools penalized risk takers. Most educational systems reward those who play it safe. As a result, those who do well in school find it hard to take risks later on.” —Richard Farson & Ralph Keyes, Whoever Makes the Most Mistakes Wins

394 EXCELLENCE. AWOL. THE SCHOOLS FIASCO. MBA.

395 So, who wants to “master” “administration”?

396 15 “Leading” Biz Schools Design/Core: 0 Design/Elective: 1 Creativity/Core: 0 Creativity/Elective: 4 Innovation/Core: 0 Innovation/Elective: 6 Source: DMI/Summer 2002/Research by Thomas Lockwood

397 *B.Schools (“M.I.A.” or at most “B.I.A.”—barely in action)
M.I.A.*: Talk. (Present.) Listen. (Interview.) Sell. (Life = Sales.) Do. (Execution-Implementation.) Talent. (Recruit-Develop-Retain.) Project Management. (Create. Solicit support. Execution. Adoption-Client “Culture Change.”) Product. (“It.”) Innovation. (Design. Creativity. “Buzz-building.” Politics.) Leadership. (USMA, etc.) E.Q. (Connect.) “Culture” Change. (Lasting impact.) Diversity. (Cross-cultural Effectiveness.) Career Creation. (Brand You life-lifestyle.) Wellness. (Life.) *B.Schools (“M.I.A.” or at most “B.I.A.”—barely in action)

398 New Economy Biz Degree Programs MBA (Master of Business Administration) MMM1 (Master of Metaphysical Management) MMM2 (Master of Metabolic Management) MGLF (Master of Great Leaps Forward) MTD (Master of Talent Development) W/MwGTDw/oC (Woman/Man Who Gets Things Done without Certificate) DE (Doctor of Enthusiasm)

399 School vs School 2007

400 J. D. Rockefeller’s General Education Board (1915): “In our dreams people yield themselves with perfect docility to our molding hands. … The task is simple. We will organize children and teach them in a perfect way the things their fathers and mothers are doing in an imperfect way.” Source: John Taylor Gatto, A Different Kind of Teacher

401 “Schools were designed by Horace Mann, E. I
“Schools were designed by Horace Mann, E.I. Thorndike, and others to be instruments of the scientific management of a mass population. Schools are intended to produce, through the application of formulas, formulaic human beings whose behavior can be predicted and controlled. To a very great extent, schools succeed in doing this. But in a society that is increasingly fragmented, in which the only genuinely successful people are independent, self-reliant, and individualistic, the products of school and ‘schooling’ are irrelevant.” Source: A Different Kind of Teacher, John Taylor Gatto

402 “Our education system is a second-rate, factory-style organization, pumping out obsolete information in obsolete ways. [Schools] are simply not connected to the future of the kids they’re responsible for.” —Alvin Toffler, Business 2.0

403 “What [standardized tests] actually measure is the tractability of the student, and this they do quite accurately. Is it of value to know who is docile and who is not? You tell me.” —John Taylor Gatto, A Different Kind of Teacher

404 “I discovered the brutally simple motivation behind the development and imposition of all systematic instructional programs and tests – a lack of trust that teachers can teach and that children can learn.” —Frank Smith, Insult to Intelligence

405 “It is an inescapable reality that students learn at different rates in different ways. That creates the need for a schedule of sensitivity that only teachers close to the particular student can devise – not some theory-driven, central-office, computer-managed schedule.” —Ted Sizer

406 “A substantial amount of testimony exists from highly regarded scientists like [Nobel laureate] Richard Feynman, Albert Einstein, and many others, that scientific discovery is negatively related to the procedures of school science classes.” —John Taylor Gatto, A Different Kind of Teacher

407 TP’S EDUCATION MANIFESTO FOR THE 3RD MILLENEUM

408 Education3M Learning is a normal state. Children are learnavores
Education3M Learning is a normal state. Children are learnavores. Prodigious feats of learning are common as dirt. [Watch an H.S. QB studying game film.] We learn at different rates. We learn in different ways. Boys and girls learn [very] differently. In a class of 25, there are 25 different trajectories. Learning in 40-minutes blocks is bullshit. Learning for tests is utterly insane. There are numerous rigorous evaluation schemes, of which testing is but one—and abnormal, by “real world” standards.

409 Education3M We learn most/fastest/most completely when we are passionate about what we are learning and it matters to us. [Salience rules!] Think EBI/LBI: Education by Interest/Learning by Internship. Classrooms are abnormal places. We need changes of pace. [e.g., Japanese recesses after each class.] International test scores are not correlated with hours-per-year in class. Big classes are slightly problematic. Big schools suck. Period.

410 Education3M “All this”—the right stuff—fits the NWW/New World of Work hand-in-glove. [NWW = Age of Creativity.] U.S. schools circa 2001 are a vestige of the Prussian-Fordist model, more interested in shaping behavior than stoking the fires of lifelong learning. Cutting art-music budgets is truly dumb. Learning is a matter of Intensity of Engagement, not elapsed time. [Aargh: 11 minutes on the Battle of Gettysburg.] Teachers need enough space-time-flexibility to get to know kids as individuals. Scientific discovery processes and the teaching of science are utterly at odds. [Exploration vs. spoon-feeding.]

411 Education3M Our toughest “learning achievement”—mastering our native language—does not require schools, or even competent parents. [It does require a desperate need-to-know.] Great teachers are great learners, not imparters-of-knowledge. Great teachers ask great questions—that launch kids on lifelong quests. The world is not about “right” & “wrong” answers; it is about the pursuit of increasingly sophisticated questions—just ask a ski instructor or neurosurgeon.

412 Education3M Most schools spend most of their time setting up contexts in which kids learn not to like particular subjects. [Evidence shows that such anti-learning sticks!] Vigorous exploration is normal … until you are incarcerated in a school. “Bite size” education-learning is neither education nor learning. Learning takes place rapidly on the cheerleading squad, the football team, the school newspaper, the drama club, at the after-class job--just not in the hyper-structured classroom.

413 Education3M The “school reform” “movement” is a giant step … backwards … embracing the Prussian-Fordist paradigm with renewed vigor—at exactly the wrong time. There are large numbers of superb schools, superb principals, superb teachers; sadly, they not only fail to infect the [largely timid] rest, but are ordinarily supplanted by wusses & wimps. Alas, the teaching profession does not ordinarily attract “cool dudes & dudettes.” Schools of “education” should by and large have their charters revoked.

414 Education3M “Education” must “develop in youth the capabilities for engaging in intense concentrated involvement in an activity.” [James Coleman, 1974.] [Hint: It doesn’t.] [Hint: Understatement.] Stability is dead; “education” must therefore “educate” for an unknowable, ambiguous, changing future; thence, learning to learn & change is far more important than mastery of a static body of “facts.” [Was the “War of the Roses” really over roses? (1) I don’t remember. (2) Not remembering has not been a handicap.]

415 Education3M I never took a speech course. Hemmingway couldn’t spell
Education3M I never took a speech course. Hemmingway couldn’t spell. Etc. Etc. Etc.

416 To the NAESP* … *National Association of Elementary School Principals

417 We ask kids to “behave” and “sit quietly” … and then tell them to study history’s heroes as role models.

418 Attributes of Those Who “Made” the 10th Grade History Book
Committed! Determined to make a difference! Focused! Passionate! Irrational about their life’s project! Ahead of their time / Paradigm busters! Impatient! / Action Obsessed

419 Attributes of Those Who “Made” the 10th Grade History Book
Made lots of people mad! Flouted the chain of command! Creative / Quirky / Peculiar! / Rebels! / Irreverent! Masters of improv / Thrive on chaos / Exploit chaos!

420 Attributes of Those Who “Made” the 10th Grade History Book
Bone honest! Flawed as the dickens! “In touch” with their followers’ aspirations Damn good at what they do!

421 Attributes of Those Who “Made” the 10th Grade History Book
Forgiveness > Permission Bone honest! Flawed as the dickens! “In touch” with their followers’ aspirations Damn good at what they do!

422 EXCELLENCE. BEDROCK. TALENT PLUS. HEALTH.

423 TP ON HEALTHCARE

424 2m38s

425 “When I climb Mount Rainier I face less risk of death than I’ll face on the operating table.” —Don Berwick

426 Quality. DSS. Prevention. Wellness. Chronic care. Elder care
Quality! DSS! Prevention! Wellness! Chronic care! Elder care! Convenient care! Childhood obesity! H5N1!

427 “Quality”: COULD IT TRULY BE THIS AWFUL?

428 CDC 1998: 90,000 killed and 2,000,000 injured from hospital-caused drug errors & infections

429 HealthGrades/Denver: 195,000 hospital deaths per year in the U. S
HealthGrades/Denver: 195,000 hospital deaths per year in the U.S., = 390 full jumbos/747s in the drink per year. Comments: “This should give you pause when you go to the hospital.” —Dr. Kenneth Kizer, National Quality Forum “There is little evidence that patient safety has improved in the last five years.” —Dr. Samantha Collier Source: Boston Globe/

430 1,000,000 “serious medication errors per year” … “illegible handwriting, misplaced decimal points, and missed drug interactions and allergies.” Source: Wall Street Journal /Institute of Medicine

431 “Hospital infections kill an estimated 103,000 people in the United States a year, as many as AIDS, breast cancer and auto accidents combined. … Today, experts estimate that more than 60 percent of staph infections are M.R.S.A. [up from 2 percent in 1974]. Hospitals in Denmark, Finland and the Netherlands once faced similar rates, but brought them down to below 1 percent. How? Through the rigorous enforcement of rules on hand washing, the meticulous cleaning of equipment and hospital rooms, the use of gowns and disposable aprons to prevent doctors and nurses from spreading germs on clothing and the testing of incoming patients to identify and isolate those carrying the germ. … Many hospital administrators say they can’t afford to take the necessary precautions.” —Betsy McCaughey, founder of the Committee to Reduce Infection Deaths (New York Times/ )

432 #40* *77.9, below Costa Rica, Cuba/USN&WR, 0326.07

433 “We need Florence Nightingale hygiene
“We need Florence Nightingale hygiene.” Source: UK corner on problems in British healthcare, The Daily Telegraph,

434 HEALTHCARE VS HEALTH

435 “What’s Really Propping Up the Economy: Healthcare has added 1
“What’s Really Propping Up the Economy: Healthcare has added 1.7 million jobs since The rest of the private sector? None .” Source: Title, cover story, BusinessWeek,

436 TP Recommendation. #1: Dubai Healthcare City to Dubai Health City
TP Recommendation* #1: Dubai Healthcare City to Dubai Health City *Presentation at “First Middle Eastern Healthcare Summit”/

437 Sexy Cures vs Quality/Safety Surgeons vs Family Practice Physicians/CIOs Fixing vs Preventing Healthcare vs Health Tom/$53K vs 1,000 Africans [Stanford?] vs Griffin/Planetree SF Internist vs Tom/Canyon Ranch

438 Childhood Obesity > Terrorism

439 Bust fat docs!

440 Sprint/Overland Park KS: Slow elevators, distant parking lots with infrequent buses, “food court” as “poorly” placed as possible, etc. Source: New York Times

441 “Bump into factor”: Extra-size portions, eat more
“Bump into factor”: Extra-size portions, eat more. Higher % shelf space snacks, more obesity. More liquor stores, more crime. High vs low fat: Japanese who emigrate to U.S. suffer 3X increase in heart disease. Source: Tom Farley & Deborah Cohen, Prescription for a Healthy Nation

442 “Microsystems” Paul Batalden/ DHMC- Intensive Care Nursery/ X-disciplinary

443 “Every $1 spent on its wellness program ended up saving [Citigroup] $4
“Every $1 spent on its wellness program ended up saving [Citigroup] $4.70, according to an academic study.” —WSJ/

444 Sexy Cures vs Quality/Safety Surgeons vs Family Practice Physicians /CIOs Fixing vs Preventing Healthcare vs Health Tom/$53K vs 1,000 Africans [Stanford?] vs Griffith/Planetree SF Internist vs Tom/Canyon Ranch

445 NHS hospital revolution: demise of the “general hospital”; rise of specialist hospitals and outpatient “superclinics” Source: The Guardian,

446 PLANETREE/ PLANETREE ALLIANCE: A DIFFERENT MODEL

447 Planetree: A Radical Model for New Healthcare/Healing/ Wellness Excellence Tom Peters/30 March 2007

448 tom peters/response to request for comment on Planetree
"All sane persons agree that 'healthcare needs an overhaul.' And that's where the agreement stops. Healthcare issues are thorny, and system panaceas are about as likely as the sun rising in the West. But there is good news here and there—and great news courtesy the Planetree Model. "In the midst of ceaseless gnashing of teeth over 'healthcare issues,' the patient and frontline staff often get lost in the shuffle. Enter Planetree. While oceanic systemic solutions remain out of reach, Planetree provides a remarkable demonstration of what healthcare—with the patient at the center—can be all about; and is all about among Planetree Alliance members. "I know this may sound ridiculous, but everything about the 'model' works. It is great for patients and their families—and is truly about humanity and healing and health and long-term wellness, not just a 'fix' for today's problem. It is great for staff—Planetree-Griffin is rightly near the top of the 'best places to work in America' list, year in and year out. And Planetree also works as a 'business model'—any effectiveness measure you can name is in the Green Zone at Griffith. "For 25 years my 'gig' has been 'excellence.' Put simply, there is no better exemplar of customer-centered, employee-friendly excellence, in any industry, than Griffin-Planetree. The Planetree model works—and in my extensive work in the health sector, I 'sell' it shamelessly, and pray that my clients are taking it all in." tom peters/response to request for comment on Planetree

449 “It was the goal of the Planetree Unit to help patients not only get well faster but also to stay well longer.” —Putting Patients First, Susan Frampton, Laura Gilpin, Patrick Charmel

450 “Much of our current healthcare is about curing. Curing is good
“Much of our current healthcare is about curing . Curing is good. But healing is spiritual, and healing is better, because we can heal many people we cannot cure.” —Leland Kaiser, “Holistic Hospitals”

451 Determinants of Health Access to care: 10% Genetics: 20% Environment: 20% Health Behaviors: 50% Source: Institute for the Future

452 The 9 Planetree Practices 1. The Importance of Human Interaction 2
The 9 Planetree Practices 1. The Importance of Human Interaction 2. Informing and Empowering Diverse Populations: Consumer Health Libraries and Patient Information 3. Healing Partnerships: The importance of Including Friends and Family 4. Nutrition: The Nurturing Aspect of Food 5. Spirituality: Inner Resources for Healing 6. Human Touch: The Essentials of Communicating Caring Through Massage 7. Healing Arts: Nutrition for the Soul 8. Integrating Complementary and Alternative Practices into Conventional Care 9. Healing Environments: Architecture and Design Conducive to Health Source: Putting Patients First, Susan Frampton, Laura Gilpin, Patrick Charmel

453 1. The Importance of Human Interaction

454 Press Ganey Assoc: 139,380 former patients from 225 hospitals: none of THE top 15 factors determining Patient Satisfaction referred to patient’s health outcome PS directly related to Staff Interaction PS directly correlated with Employee Satisfaction Source: Putting Patients First, Susan Frampton, Laura Gilpin, Patrick Charmel

455 “There is a misconception that supportive interactions require more staff or more time and are therefore more costly. Although labor costs are a substantial part of any hospital budget, the interactions themselves add nothing to the budget. Kindness is free. Listening to patients or answering their questions costs nothing. It can be argued that negative interactions—alienating patients, being non-responsive to their needs or limiting their sense of control—can be very costly. … Angry, frustrated or frightened patients may be combative, withdrawn and less cooperative—requiring far more time than it would have taken to interact with them initially in a positive way.” —Putting Patients First, Susan Frampton, Laura Gilpin, Patrick Charmel

456 “Perhaps the simplest and most profound of all human interactions is KINDNESS. … But if it is so simple, it is surprising how frequently it is absent from our healthcare environments. … Many staff members report verbal ‘abuse’ by physicians, managers and coworkers.” —Putting Patients First, Susan Frampton, Laura Gilpin, Patrick Charmel

457 “Planetree is about human beings caring for other human beings
“Planetree is about human beings caring for other human beings.” —Putting Patients First, Susan Frampton, Laura Gilpin, Patrick Charmel (“Ladies and gentlemen serving ladies and gentlemen”—4S credo)

458 2. Informing and Empowering Diverse Populations: Consumer Health Libraries and Patient Information

459 Planetree Health Resources Center/1981 Planetree Classification System Consumer Health Librarians Volunteers Classes, lectures Health Fairs Griffin’s Mobile Health Resource Center Open Chart Policy Patient Progress Notes Care Coordination Conferences (Est goals, timetable, etc.) Source: Putting Patients First, Susan Frampton, Laura Gilpin, Patrick Charmel

460 3. Healing Partnerships: The Importance of Including Friends and Family

461 “When hospital staff members are asked to list the attributes of the ‘perfect patient and family,’ their response is usually a passive patient with no family.” —Putting Patients First, Susan Frampton, Laura Gilpin, Patrick Charmel

462 The Patient-Family Experience “Patients are stripped of control, their clothes are taken away, they have little say over their schedule, and they are deliberately separated from their family and friends. Healthcare professionals control all of the information about their patients’ bodies and access to the people who can answer questions and connect them with helpful resources. Families are treated more as intruders than loved ones.” —Putting Patients First, Susan Frampton, Laura Gilpin, Patrick Charmel

463 “Family members, close friends and ‘significant others’ can have a far greater impact on patients’ experience of illness, and on their long-term health and happiness, than any healthcare professional.” —Through the Patient’s Eyes

464 “A 7-year follow-up of women diagnosed with breast cancer showed that those who confided in at least one person in the 3 months after surgery had a 7-year survival rate of 72.4%, as compared to 56.3% for those who didn’t have a confidant.” —Institute for the Future

465 Institute of Medicine/ “Crossing the Quality Chasm” Respect for preferences Involvement in Decision Making Access to care Coordination of care Information and education Physical comfort Emotional support Involvement of Friends and Family Continuity of care Source: Putting Patients First, Susan Frampton, Laura Gilpin, Patrick Charmel

466 Care Partner Programs (IDs, discount meals, etc
Care Partner Programs (IDs, discount meals, etc.) Unrestricted visits (“Most Planetree hospitals have eliminated visiting restrictions altogether.”) (ER at one hospital “has a policy of never separating the patient from the family, and there is no limitation on how many family members may be present.”) Collaborative Care Conferences Clinical Guidelines Discussions Family Spaces Pet Visits (POP: Patients’ Own Pets) Source: Putting Patients First, Susan Frampton, Laura Gilpin, Patrick Charmel

467 4. Nutrition: The Nurturing Aspect of Food

468 Meals are central events vs “There, you’re fed. ”
Meals are central events vs “There, you’re fed.” * *Irony: Focus on “nutrition” has reduced focus on “food” and “service” Source: Putting Patients First, Susan Frampton, Laura Gilpin, Patrick Charmel

469 Kitchen Beautiful cutlery, plates, etc Chef reputation Source: Putting Patients First, Susan Frampton, Laura Gilpin, Patrick Charmel

470 Aroma therapy (e.g., “smell of baking cookies”) Source: Putting Patients First, Susan Frampton, Laura Gilpin, Patrick Charmel

471 5. Spirituality: Inner Resources for Healing

472 Spirituality: Meaning and Connectedness in Life 1
Spirituality: Meaning and Connectedness in Life 1. Connected to supportive and caring group 2. Sense of mastery and control 3. Make meaning out of disease/ find meaning in suffering Source: Putting Patients First, Susan Frampton, Laura Gilpin, Patrick Charmel

473 Griffin: redesign chapel (waterfall, quiet music, open prayer book) Other: music, flowers, portable labyrinth Source: Putting Patients First, Susan Frampton, Laura Gilpin, Patrick Charmel

474 6. Human Touch: The Essentials of Communicating Caring Through Massage

475 “Massage is a powerful way to communicate caring
“Massage is a powerful way to communicate caring.” —Putting Patients First, Susan Frampton, Laura Gilpin, Patrick Charmel

476 Mid-Columbia Medical Center/Center for Mind and Body Massage for every patient scheduled for ambulatory surgery (“Go into surgery with a good attitude”) Infant massage Staff massage (“caring for the caregivers”) Healing environments: chemo! Source: Putting Patients First, Susan Frampton, Laura Gilpin, Patrick Charmel

477 7. Healing Arts: Nutrition for the Soul

478 Planetree: “Environment conducive to healing” Color. Light. Brilliance
Planetree: “Environment conducive to healing” Color! Light! Brilliance! Form! Art! Music! Source: Putting Patients First, Susan Frampton, Laura Gilpin, Patrick Charmel

479 Florence Nightingale/Notes on Nursing/patient’s need for beauty, windows, flowers: “People say the effect is only on the mind. It is no such thing. The effect is on the body, too.” Source: Putting Patients First, Susan Frampton, Laura Gilpin, Patrick Charmel

480 Griffin: Music in the parking lot; professional musicians in the lobby (7/week, 3-4hrs/day) ; 5 pianos ; volunteers ( hrs arts & entertainment per month). Source: Putting Patients First, Susan Frampton, Laura Gilpin, Patrick Charmel

481 8. Integrating Complementary and Alternative Practices into Conventional Care

482 Griffin IMC/Integrative Medicine Center Massage Acupuncture Meditation Chiropractic Nutritional supplements Aroma therapy Source: Putting Patients First, Susan Frampton, Laura Gilpin, Patrick Charmel

483 CAM (Complementary & Alternative Medicine): 83M in US (42%) CAM visits 243M, greater than to PCP (Primary Care Physician) (With min insurance coverage) W-Educated-Hi inc Don’t tell PCP (40%) OTA: <30% procedures used in conventional medicine have undergone RCTs (randomized clinical trials) Source: Putting Patients First, Susan Frampton, Laura Gilpin, Patrick Charmel

484 9. Healing Environments: Architecture and Design Conducive to Health

485 “Planetree Look” Woods and natural materials Indirect lighting Homelike settings Goals: Welcome patients, friends and family … Value humans over technology .. Enable patients to participate in their care … Provide flexibility to personalize the care of each patient … Encourage caregivers to be responsive to patients … Foster a connection to nature and beauty Source: Putting Patients First, Susan Frampton, Laura Gilpin, Patrick Charmel

486 Sound Texture Lighting Color Smell Taste Sacred space Source: Putting Patients First, Susan Frampton, Laura Gilpin, Patrick Charmel

487 Access to nurses station: “Happen to” vs “Happen with” Source: Putting Patients First, Susan Frampton, Laura Gilpin, Patrick Charmel

488 The Eden Alternative* *ElderCare

489 The Ten Principals of the Eden Alternative 1
The Ten Principals of the Eden Alternative 1. The three plagues of loneliness, helplessness, and boredom account for the bulk of suffering among Elders. 2. Life in an Elder-centered community revolves around close and continuing contact with children, plants, and animals. These ancient relationships provide young and old alike with a pathway to a life worth living. 3. Companionship is the antidote to loneliness. In an Elder-centered community we must provide easy access to human and animal companionship. 4. A healthy Elder-centered community seeks to balance the care that is being given with the care that is being received. Elders need opportunities to give care and caregivers need opportunities to receive care. Source: Putting Patients First, Susan Frampton, Laura Gilpin, Patrick Charmel

490 “The Eden paradigm allows elders to care for animals, birds, and children as well as each other.” —Susan Eaton, Harvard/JFK school Source: Putting Patients First, Susan Frampton, Laura Gilpin, Patrick Charmel

491 The Ten Principals of the Eden Alternative 5
The Ten Principals of the Eden Alternative 5. Variety and Spontaneity are the antidotes to boredom. The Elder-centered community is rich in opportunities to sample these ancient pleasures. 6. An Elder-centered community understands that passive entertainment cannot fill a human life. 7. The Elder-centered community takes medical treatment down from its pedestal and and places it into the service of genuine human caring. Source: Putting Patients First, Susan Frampton, Laura Gilpin, Patrick Charmel

492 The Ten Principals of the Eden Alternative 8
The Ten Principals of the Eden Alternative 8. In an Elder-centered community, decisions should be made by the Elders or those as close to the Elders as possible. 9. An Elder-centered community understands human growth cannot be separated from human life. 10. Wise leadership is the lifeblood of any struggle against the Three Plagues. For it, there can be no substitute. Source: Putting Patients First, Susan Frampton, Laura Gilpin, Patrick Charmel

493 “The most basic question we need to pose in caring for others is this: Is this a loving act?” —Leland Kaiser, “Holistic Hospitals” Source: Putting Patients First, Susan Frampton, Laura Gilpin, Patrick Charmel

494 Conclusion: Caring/Growth “Experience”

495 Care!/Love!/Spirit! Self-Control! Connect!/learn!/ involve!/Engage! Understanding!/Growth! De-stress!/heal! Whole patient & family & friends! be well!/stay well!

496 F.Y.I.

497 Griffin Hospital/Derby CT (Planetree Alliance “HQ”) Results: Financially successful. Expanding programs-physically. Growing market share. Only hospital in “100 Best Cos to Work for”— 7 consecutive years, currently #6. —“Five-Star Hospitals,” Joe Flower, strategy+business (#42)

498 Learn more about Planetree/ The Planetree Alliance: www.planetree.org

499 EXCELLE ALWAYS.

500 Pause …

501 Them-Us

502 “Them” “Us” Strategy EXECUTION Planning Action Marketing Selling/Sales Markets Customers Customers Clients Micro-segmentation Big Stuff (Women, Boomers) Cost minimization Revenue maximization Synergy/“Efficiencies” Decentralization “Strategic” supplier Pioneering supplier Process Project Effectiveness Excellence Men Women Leadership Management + Leadership Standardization Exceptionalism (53 = 53) Big clients COOL clients Prestigious Board INTERESTING Board

503 “Them” “Us” Big Mid-size Growth by merger Organic growth Buy market share Create NEW markets Efficient, streamlined Value-creating “PSF” “department” Certainty-predictability Ambiguity-opportunity Fearful of losing Aggressive pursuit of winning Plan Prototype Careful evaluation Another prototype Revised plan Another prototype People/Employees Talent Effective HR department Rockin’ Talent Development Center of Excellence Benchmark against the Benchmark against the “best”-“industry leader” “coolest”

504 “Them” “Us” Benchmark “Future”mark Orderly career progression “Up or Out” (PDQ) Head Heart IQ EQ “Professional” Passionate Stoic, humble leaders Noisy, emotional “characters” in charge Hire for Resume Hire for intangibles Measured-thoughtful Relentless, pig-headed approach determination Teamwork comes first Teamwork and disruptive individuals equal billing Listen to customers Lead customers Customer “involvement” Intimate-Seamless customer inter-twining

505 “Them” “Us” MBM (Management MBWA by memo) MBA MFA Shareholder Value Great people-product rule comes first Work smart Work hard Built to last Built to Rock the World Reward successes Reward (EXCELLENT) failures Quality first! Design 1T Quality first Innovation 1T High-quality Jaw-dropping Experience transaction CVs demo consistent CVs feature Magic Moments performance Good grades Cool stuff Operational excellence World-rocking INNOVATION

506 “Them” “Us” Brand Lovemark Best analysis wins Best STORY wins “Beyond politics” Politics-is-life, the rest is details Outsource Bestsource “Motivate” Send on QUESTS “Motivate” Invite Measured language HOT language Product-Service Gamechanging SOLUTION, Thrilling EXPERIENCE, DREAM come true, LOVEMARK Pastel Technicolor Better Different “Mission success” “Mission EXCELLENCE” Very good EXCELLENCE. ALWAYS.

507 End Pause

508 EXCELLE ALWAYS.

509 EXCELLE ALWAYS. End. PART FIVE.


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