Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Episodes a shared approach for timing web pages Steve Souders Google Disclaimer: This content does not necessarily reflect.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Episodes a shared approach for timing web pages Steve Souders Google Disclaimer: This content does not necessarily reflect."— Presentation transcript:

1 Episodes a shared approach for timing web pages Steve Souders Google Disclaimer: This content does not necessarily reflect the opinions of my employer.

2 measuring to onload many current timing frameworks stop at the onload event Keynote, Gomez Fasterfox, YSlow IE, FF, etc. ("Done" in the statusbar) onload doesn't capture "page ready" in Web 2.0 some apps render content above the fold before onload and that is the "page ready" point some apps do critical JS and DOM after onload Ajax actions often don't have onload

3 measuring Web 2.0 apps: 2 choices manual scripting - identify timing points using scripting tools (Watir, Selenium, KITE, etc.) accuracy (does script author know key points?) high switching costs (eg, moving from Watir to KITE) high maintenance costs redundant work (think # of Google Search scripts created worldwide) synthetic (no real user measurements) programmatic scripting - timing points are marked by JavaScript in the page itself (Jiffy, Gomez, etc.) observer effect reinvent the wheel JS instrumentation in pages has to be changed across frameworks

4 programmatic scripting is preferred embedding timing in the actual web app reduces maintenance costs and improves accuracy (app developer more likely to know the appropriate timing points and keep them up-to-date) measures real user traffic creating a shared approach resolves many drawbacks no need to reinvent could be used by all companies, frameworks, and tools

5 a shared approach: scenario 1 web company wants to measure real traffic current approach: write a JS library instrument page beacon back measurements write code to generate reports shared approach: use Episodes instrument page beacon back measurements use existing code to generate reports

6 a shared approach: scenario 2 web company wants to measure their pages using a service (Keynote, Gomez, WebMetrics, etc.) current approach: create manual scripts (hard to maintain, different from other scripting tools) or use service provider's JS library (different from other JS libraries) run synthetic tests shared approach: pages already instrumented using Episodes; Episodes understood by service's test agent run synthetic tests

7 a shared approach: scenario 3 web company wants to measure competitors' pages using a service (Keynote, Gomez, WebMetrics, etc.) current approach: create manual scripts (hard to maintain, different from other scripting tools) run synthetic tests shared approach: pages already instrumented using Episodes; Episodes understood by service's test agent run synthetic tests

8 a shared approach: scenario 4 client apps (browser, dev tool) want to measure pages current approach: measure to the onload event or end of HTTP traffic shared approach: measure Episodes

9 Episodes – a shared approach ideal vision of what Episodes looks like: uses events to signal episodes window.postMessage("EPISODES:measure:pageready", "*"); supports multiple listeners window.addEventListener("message", callback, false); inserting markers is separate from gathering episodes most of the implementation is built into browsers ( postMessage, addEventListener, aggregating episode times) browsers record when the current page's request began window.navigator.starttime many (most) web sites instrument their pages with Episodes industry-wide agreement on 5-10 Episode names: totaltime, pageready, timetofirstbyte, timefromfirstbyte, etc. measurement service providers support Episodes browsers and dev tools report Episodes

10 Episodes – code sample window.postMessage("EPISODES:mark:firstbyte", "http://stevesouders.com"); window.postMessage("EPISODES:measure:backend:starttime:firstbyte", "http://stevesouders.com"); window.postMessage("EPISODES:mark:jquery.min.js", "http://stevesouders.com"); window.postMessage("EPISODES:measure:jquery.min.js", "http://stevesouders.com"); window.onload = function() { window.postMessage("EPISODES:measure:frontend:firstbyte", "http://stevesouders.com"); window.postMessage("EPISODES:measure:totaltime:starttime", "http://stevesouders.com"); window.postMessage("EPISODES:done", "http://stevesouders.com"); }...

11

12

13 Episodes - next steps solicit feedback, get agreement implement JS library using custom events (e.g., YUI) for browsers that don't support postMessage.js hosted from a shared URL for greater caching browser plug-ins (Gears, Firebug, etc.) support window.navigator.starttime measurement frameworks and dev tools start supporting Episodes greater visibility of performance

14 FAQ Q: Will this weigh down the page making it slower? A: Yes, but less than current approaches that are already getting adoption. As the bulk of implementation moves into the browser, impact will be even less. Q: Won't people game the standardized episode names? A: There are a few dynamics that encourage sites to accurately instrument their pages. They need this so that their own metrics are accurate. And if they game the system bloggers will call them on it. Q: Why would companies want to cooperate? A: Cooperating drives down costs. You can't hide the truth. Competitors already measure each other, it's just inefficient. Raising the cost to measure doesn't hinder the biggest competitors. Q: Where'd you get the name "Episodes"? A: From Doug Crockford. Thanks, Doug!


Download ppt "Episodes a shared approach for timing web pages Steve Souders Google Disclaimer: This content does not necessarily reflect."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google