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Copyright © 2004 WA Rutala Prions (CJD) and Processing of Reusable Medical Products William A. Rutala, Ph.D., M.P.H. University of North Carolina (UNC)

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Presentation on theme: "Copyright © 2004 WA Rutala Prions (CJD) and Processing of Reusable Medical Products William A. Rutala, Ph.D., M.P.H. University of North Carolina (UNC)"— Presentation transcript:

1 Copyright © 2004 WA Rutala Prions (CJD) and Processing of Reusable Medical Products William A. Rutala, Ph.D., M.P.H. University of North Carolina (UNC) Hospitals and UNC School of Medicine

2 Copyright © 2004 WA Rutala Prions and Processing of Reusable Medical Products Topics l Rationale for United States recommendations Epidemiological studies of prion transmission Infectivity of human tissues Efficacy of removing microbes by cleaning Prion inactivation studies Risk associated with instruments l Recommendations to prevent cross-transmission from medical devices contaminated with prions

3 Copyright © 2004 WA Rutala Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSEs) of Humans l Kuru l Gertsmann-Straussler-Scheinker (GSS) l Fatal Familial Insomnia (FFI) l Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) l Variant CJD (vCJD), 1995

4 Copyright © 2004 WA Rutala CJD

5 Copyright © 2004 WA Rutala Prions and Processing of Reusable Medical Products l Rationale for US recommendations Epidemiological studies of prion transmission Epidemiological studies of prion transmission via surgical instruments Infectivity of human tissues Efficacy of removing microbes by cleaning Prion inactivation studies Risk associated with instruments

6 Copyright © 2004 WA Rutala Transmissibility of Prions l Transmission Not spread by contact (direct, indirect, droplet) or airborne Not spread by the environment Experimentally-all TSEs are transmissible to animals, including the inherited forms Epidemiology of CJD: sporadic-85%; familial-15%; iatrogenic- 1% (primarily transplant of high risk tissues, ~250 cases worldwide)

7 Copyright © 2004 WA Rutala Iatrogenic Transmission of CJD l Contaminated medical instruments Electrodes in brain (2) Neurosurgical instruments in brain (4) l Dura mater grafts (>110) l Corneal grafts (3) l Human growth hormone and gonadotropin (>130)

8 Copyright © 2004 WA Rutala Prions and Processing of Reusable Medical Products Historical Perspective l CJD and other TSEs exhibit an unusual resistance to conventional chemical and physical decontamination methods l Until recently, all medical/surgical instruments from CJD patients received special prion reprocessing l Draft guidelines of the CDC (Favero, 1995) suggested a risk assessment consider cleaning and prion bioburden that results from contact with infectious tissues

9 Copyright © 2004 WA Rutala Prions and Processing of Reusable Medical Products l Rationale for US recommendations Epidemiological studies of prion transmission Epidemiological studies of prion transmission via surgical instruments Infectivity of human tissues Efficacy of removing microbes by cleaning Prion inactivation studies Risk associated with instruments

10 Copyright © 2004 WA Rutala CJD and Medical Devices l Six cases of CJD associated with medical devices 2 confirmed cases-depth electrodes; reprocessed by benzene, alcohol and formaldehyde vapor 4 unconfirmed cases-CJD following brain surgery, index CJD identified-1, suspect neurosurgical instruments l Cases occurred from in UK, France and Switzerland l No cases since 1980 and no known failure of steam sterilization

11 Copyright © 2004 WA Rutala Prions and Processing of Reusable Medical Products l Rationale for US recommendations Epidemiological studies of prion transmission Epidemiological studies of prion transmission via surgical instruments Infectivity of human tissues Efficacy of removing microbes by cleaning Prion inactivation studies Risk associated with instruments

12 Copyright © 2004 WA Rutala Risk of CJD Transmission l Epidemiologic evidence (eye, brain, pituitary) linking specific body tissue or fluids to CJD transmission l Experimental evidence in animals demonstrating that body tissues or fluids transmit CJD Infectivity assays a function of the relative concentration of CJD tissue or fluid

13 Copyright © 2004 WA Rutala Risk of CJD Transmission Risk of InfectionTissue HighBrain (including dura mater), spinal cord, and eye LowCSF, liver, lymph node, kidney, lung, spleen, placenta, olfactory epithelium NoPeripheral nerve, intestine, bone marrow, whole blood, leukocytes, serum, thyroid gland, adrenal gland, heart, skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, gingiva, prostate, testis, tears, nasal mucus, saliva, sputum, urine, feces, semen, vaginal secretions, and milk High-transmission to inoc animals >50%; Low-transmission to inoc animals >10-20% but no epid evidence of human inf

14 Copyright © 2004 WA Rutala Prions and Processing of Reusable Medical Products l Rationale for US recommendations Epidemiological studies of prion transmission Epidemiological studies of prion transmission via surgical instruments Infectivity of human tissues Efficacy of removing microbes by cleaning Prion inactivation studies Risk associated with instruments

15 Copyright © 2004 WA Rutala CJD: DISINFECTION AND STERILIZATION l Effectiveness must consider both removal by cleaning and inactivation Probability of a device remaining capable of transmitting disease depends on the initial contamination and effectiveness of cleaning/disinfection/sterilization. Device with 50ug of CJD brain with a titer of 6 log 10 LD 50 /g would have 5 x 10 4 infectious units

16 Copyright © 2004 WA Rutala CJD: DISINFECTION AND STERILIZATION l Effectiveness of cleaning Cleaning results in a 4 to 6 log 10 reduction of microbes and ~2 log 10 reduction in protein contamination Recent data: alkaline detergents reduce 5 log 10 prions (FDA, 2003, J Hosp Infect, 2004); enzymes that digest prions at 70 o C reduce 5-6 log 10 prions (J Inf Dis, 2003) Ideally, in the future new alkaline/enzymatic cleaners and routinely available sterilization processes will lead to sterilization methods for prion-contaminated medical devices

17 Copyright © 2004 WA Rutala Prions and Processing of Reusable Medical Products l Rationale for US recommendations Epidemiological studies of prion transmission Epidemiological studies of prion transmission via surgical instruments Infectivity of human tissues Efficacy of removing microbes by cleaning Prion inactivation studies Risk associated with instruments

18 Copyright © 2004 WA Rutala Decreasing Order of Resistance of Microorganisms to Disinfectants/Sterilants Prions Spores Mycobacteria Non-Enveloped Viruses Fungi Bacteria Enveloped Viruses

19 Copyright © 2004 WA Rutala Prion Inactivation Studies l Problems Investigators used aliquots of brain tissue macerates vs. intact tissue (smearing, drying); weights of tissue (50mg-375mg) Studies do not reflect reprocessing procedures in a clinical setting (e.g., no cleaning) Factors that affect results include: strain of prion (22A), prion conc in brain tissue, animal used, exposure conditions, validation and cycle parameters of sterilizers, resistant subpopulation, different test tissues, different duration of observations, screw cap tubes with tissue (air), etc

20 Copyright © 2004 WA Rutala Ineffective or Partially-Effective Disinfectants: CJD l Alcohol l Ammonia l Chlorine dioxide l Formalin l Glutaraldehyde l Hydrogen peroxide l Iodophors/Iodine l Peracetic acid l Phenolics

21 Copyright © 2004 WA Rutala CJD: Ineffective Disinfectants Examples l Glutaraldehyde (5%) Partially effective l Iodine (2%) ~1 log decrease in 30m l Hydrogen peroxide (3%) ~ 1 log decrease in 60m l Formaldehyde (3.7%) ~ 1 log decrease in 60m

22 Copyright © 2004 WA Rutala Ineffective or Partially Effective Processes: CJD l Gases Ethylene oxide Formaldehyde l Physical Dry heat UV Microwave Ionizing Glass bead sterilizers Autoclave at 121 o C, 15m

23 Copyright © 2004 WA Rutala CJD: Ineffective Sterilants Examples l Steam sterilization (gravity) 121 o C and 132 o C-< 4 log 10 decrease at 15m l Ethylene oxide 88%, 4h l Glass bead sterilizers 240 o C for 15m l Dry heat 160 o C for 24h

24 Copyright © 2004 WA Rutala Effective Disinfectants (>4 log 10 decrease in LD 50 with 1 hour) l Sodium hydroxide 1 N for 1h (variable results) l Sodium hypochorite 5000 ppm for 15m l Guanidine thiocyanate 4M l Phenolic (LpH) 0.9% for 30m

25 Copyright © 2004 WA Rutala Effective Processes: CJD l Autoclave 134 o C-138 o C for 18m (prevacuum) 132 o C for 60m (gravity) l Combination (chemical exposure then steam autoclave, potentially deleterious to staff, instruments, sterilizer) Soak in 1N NaOH, autoclave 134 o C for 18m Soak in 1N NaOH, autoclave 121 o C for 30m

26 Copyright © 2004 WA Rutala Prions and Processing of Reusable Medical Products l Rationale for US recommendations Epidemiological studies of prion transmission Epidemiological studies of prion transmission via surgical instruments Infectivity of human tissues Efficacy of removing microbes by cleaning Prion inactivation studies Risk associated with instruments

27 Copyright © 2004 WA Rutala Disinfection and Sterilization l EH Spaulding believed how an object will be D/S depended on the objects intended use CRITICAL-objects that enter normally sterile tissue or the vascular system should be sterile SEMICRITICAL-objects that touch mucous membranes or skin that is not intact requires a disinfection process (high level disinfection) that kills all but bacterial spores (prions?) NONCRITICAL-objects that touch only intact skin require low-level disinfection

28 Copyright © 2004 WA Rutala Prions and Processing of Reusable Medical Products l Rationale for US recommendations Epidemiological studies of prion transmission Epidemiological studies of prion transmission via surgical instruments Infectivity of human tissues Efficacy of removing microbes by cleaning Prion inactivation studies Risk associated with instruments

29 CJD : potential for secondary spread through contaminated surgical instruments

30 Copyright © 2004 WA Rutala Risk Assessment l High risk patient-certain patients capable of transmitting infection. l High risk tissue-CJD can be transmitted to laboratory animals by inoculation of infective material. Iatrogenic episodes of CJD have been associated with these infective materials. l High risk devices-risk of infection associated with the use of the device.

31 Copyright © 2004 WA Rutala Risk Assessment: Patient, Tissue, Device l Patient Known CJD or other TSEs Rapidly progressive dementia Familial history of CJD, GSS, FFI Patients with mutation in the PrP gene involved in TSEs History of dura mater transplant, cadaver-derived pituitary hormone l Tissue High risk-brain, spinal cord, eyes l Device Critical or semicritical

32 Copyright © 2004 WA Rutala Examples: CJD D/S l High risk patient, high risk tissue, critical/semicritical device-special prion reprocessing l High risk patient, low risk tissue, critical/semicritical device- conventional D/S or special prion reprocessing l High risk patient, no risk tissue, C/SC device-conventional D/S l Low risk patient, high risk tissue, critical/semicritical device- conventional D/S l High risk patient, high risk tissue, noncritical device -conventional disinfection

33 Copyright © 2004 WA Rutala CJD: Instrument Reprocessing l High Risk Tissue, High Risk Patient, Critical/Semicritical Device-special prion reprocessing Cleaning followed by NaOH and steam sterilization (e.g., 1N NaOH 1h, 121 o C 30 min) 134 o C for >18m (prevacuum/porous) 132 o C for 1h (gravity) Discard instruments that are difficult to clean

34 Copyright © 2004 WA Rutala CJD: Instrument Reprocessing l Special prion reprocessing by combination of NaOH and steam sterilization Immerse in 1N NaOH for 1 hour; remove and rinse in water, then transfer to an open pan and autoclave for 1 hour Immerse in 1N NaOH for 1 hour and heat in a gravity displacement sterilizer at 121 o C for 30 minutes l Combined use of autoclaving in sodium hydroxide has raised concerns of possible damage to autoclaves, and hazards to operators due to the caustic fumes. l Risk can be minimized by the use of polypropylene containment pans and lids (AJIC 2003; 31:257-60).

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36 Copyright © 2004 WA Rutala CJD: Instrument Reprocessing l No Risk Tissue, High Risk Patient, Critical/Semicritical Device These devices can be cleaned and disinfected or sterilized using conventional protocols of heat or chemical sterilization, or high-level disinfection (HLD for semicritical) Endoscopes would be contaminated only with no or low risk materials and hence standard cleaning and HLD protocols would be adequate l Low Risk Tissue, High Risk Patient, Critical/Semicritical Device Conventional D/S or special prion reprocessing

37 Copyright © 2004 WA Rutala CJD: Environmental Surfaces l High/Low/No Risk Tissue, High Risk Patient, Noncritical Surface/Device Environmental surfaces contaminated with high risk tissues (autopsy table in contact with brain tissue) should be cleaned and then spot decontaminated with a 1:5 dilution of bleach Environmental surfaces contaminated with low/no risk tissue require only standard disinfection

38 Copyright © 2004 WA Rutala D/S of Medical Devices l Issues Do not allow tissue/body fluids to dry on instruments (e.g., place in liquid) Some decontamination procedures (e.g., aldehydes) fix protein and this may impede effectiveness of processes Do not exceed 134 o C Clean instruments but prevent exposure Assess risk of patient, tissue, device Choose effective process

39 Copyright © 2004 WA Rutala Conclusions l Epidemiologic evidence suggests nosocomial CJD transmission via medical devices is very rare l Guidelines based on epidemiologic evidence, tissue infectivity, risk of disease via medical devices, and inactivation data l Risk assessment based on patient, tissue and device l Only critical/semicritical devices contacting high risk tissue from high risk patients require special prion reprocessing

40 Copyright © 2004 WA Rutala CJD: Disinfection and Sterilization Conclusions l Cleaning with special prion reprocessing NaOH and steam sterilization (e.g., 1N NaOH 1h, 121 o C 30 m) 134 o C for 18m (prevacuum) 132 o C for 60m (gravity) l No low temperature sterilization technology effective l Four disinfectants (e.g., chlorine) effective (3 log decrease in LD 50 within 15 min)

41 Copyright © 2004 WA Rutala CJD: Sterilization in Health Care Used Instrument Keep Wet (do not let tissue/fluid dry) Clean (Washer Disinfector) Steam Sterilize (NaOH and SS; 134 o C, 18 min) Sterile Instrument

42 Copyright © 2004 WA Rutala Prevent Patient Exposure to CJD Contaminated Instruments How do you prevent patient exposure to neurosurgical instruments from a patient who is latter given a diagnosis of CJD? Hospitals should use the special prion reprocessing precautions for instruments from patients undergoing brain biopsy when a specific lesion has not been demonstrated (e.g., CT, MRI). Alternatively, neurosurgical instruments used in such cases could be disposable or instruments quarantined until pathology excludes CJD.

43 Copyright © 2004 WA Rutala Variant CJD l Strongly associated with epidemiology of BSE (1983) in UK l BSE amplified by feeding cattle meat and bone meal infected with BSE (bovine spongiform encephalopathy) l June 2003, 144 cases vCJD (135 in UK, 6 in France, 1 Italy, Canada, US [latter two cases resided in UK during BSE outbreak]) l Affects young persons (range 13-48y, median 28y) l Clinical course is longer l vCJD and BSE not reported in the United States l vCJD and BSE are believed caused by the same prion agent

44 Copyright © 2004 WA Rutala vCJD: Disinfection and Sterilization l To date no reports of human-to-human transmission of vCJD by tissue but a possible case of vCJD by blood transfusion l Unlike CJD, vCJD detectable in lymphoid tissues (e.g., spleen tonsils) and prior to onset of clinical illness l Special prion reprocessing (or single use instruments) proposed in the UK in dental, eye, or tonsillar surgery on high risk patients for CJD or vCJD l If epidemiological and infectivity data show these tissues represent a transmission risk then special prion reprocessing could be extended to these procedure

45 Copyright © 2004 WA Rutala Prions and Processing of Reusable Medical Products Topics l Rationale for United States recommendations Epidemiological studies of prion transmission Infectivity of human tissues Efficacy of removing microbes by cleaning Prion inactivation studies Risk associated with instruments l Recommendations to prevent cross-transmission from medical devices contaminated with prions

46 Copyright © 2004 WA Rutala Thank you

47 Copyright © 2004 WA Rutala Disinfection and Sterilization for Prion Diseases References l Rutala WA, Weber DJ. Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: Recommendations for Disinfection and Sterilization. Clin Inf Dis 2001;32: l World Health Organization. WHO infection control guidelines for transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, l Prusiner SB. Prion Biology and Diseases Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, New York. l Weber DJ, Rutala WA Managing the risks of nosocomial transmission of prion diseases. Current Opinions in Infectious Diseases. 15:

48 Copyright © 2004 WA Rutala CJD and Medical Devices l World Health Organization, 2000 When instruments contact high infectivity tissue, single-use instruments recommended. If single-use instruments not available, maximum safety attained by destruction of reusable instruments. Where destruction is not practical, reusable instruments must be decontaminated by immerse in 1N NaOH and autoclaved (121 o C/30m), cleaned, rinsed and steam sterilized. After decontamination by steam and NaOH, instruments can be cleaned in automated mechanical reprocessor.


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