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Challenges to the role of publishers Mary Waltham Publishing Consultant, Princeton,USA www.MaryWaltham.com May 16th STM meeting Amsterdam.

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Presentation on theme: "Challenges to the role of publishers Mary Waltham Publishing Consultant, Princeton,USA www.MaryWaltham.com May 16th STM meeting Amsterdam."— Presentation transcript:

1 Challenges to the role of publishers Mary Waltham Publishing Consultant, Princeton,USA May 16th STM meeting Amsterdam

2 Why does online publishing change everything? Always on Its a two way interactive medium It can link all content published online Its searchable Its scaleable It can make available more than print Its global

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4 Central issues for us all Publishing for readers or authors? Free access to research articles reduces the transaction value Aggregation and linkage of content All research fields are becoming more INTER-disciplinary Application of multi-media technology to research presentation is widespread Interoperability - standards

5 What has changed already? Costs - print+online vs online only Pricing strategies - site licenses, individuals, pay-per-view Usage print vs online Partnerships and alliances Role and types of intermediaries Copyright and online postings

6 What has changed already? More open access to information markets Government involvement Alternative publishing Importance and value of online communities Speed …..of innovation/change of publication…………..

7 How fast can we publish?

8 What has stayed the same? Information overload Authors want… Readers want… Filtration Brand Quality content Commercial support

9 What is changing? Business models author fees site licenses, subs,PPV sponsorship + advertising Products Aggregation + integration of content types Journal of record Insurrection More free access to information High Wire million articles =37% The role of publishers...

10 Changing the role of scholarly publishers What do your customers want and how do you know? Where do you add value to the process? Which sales channels and markets will you cover - and which will you choose not to? What new products are you uniquely poised to create and develop?

11 What do your customers want and how do you know? Research within your market but beware and distinguish carefully:- what users say they want how they behave when online What are online customers UNABLE to do ~ what can publishers do for them?

12 Where do you add value to the process? Crisp analysis of where and what level of resources expended to improve publications copy-editing dead links site that is easy to use Is where you add value where it yields the greatest value to customers?

13 Which sales channels and markets will you cover - and which will you choose not to? Expanded accessibility online Where is growth possible and achievable? What investment will it require? Can you make sound arrangements for expert support?

14 What new products are you uniquely poised to create and develop? Do all customers want the same product? What do they want it for? What about different versions at different price points? How/does your content connect with education? New approaches may (only) appeal to small emerging markets mainstream customers vs emergent demand ~ rational but disastrous

15 Thank you! Please contact me if you would like a copy of my talking notes from today

16 A new Company has no baggage…..it can rethink everything from scratch and tune every decision to the new realities of communications and computing. But in a big company, the whole infrastructure and culture acts like gravity, pulling you back to where you started from. You can never reach escape velocity By: Vinod Khosla – venture capitalist In fact I cannot think of a single new industry- not just new product, new industry- that was created by an existing major company in an allied business. So, the economist Schumpeters creative destruction doesnt occur as much from within companies as from new entrants, generally start-up companies. The same is true in higher education. Two very substantial educational markets have opened in the (US in the) past 20/30 years: skills training for industry, and degree training for adult students….some of the most innovative adult education is delivered by institutions that you may never have heard of. Why? Because they were desperately strapped for funds and their survival depended on innovating: going after markets, creating markets, where the traditional successful institutions wouldnt deign to go. From: Venturing by Hank Riggs, President, Keck Graduate Institute, Claremont, California

17 Major Interregional Internet Routes, 2002


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