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People, Planet, Prosperity

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Presentation on theme: "People, Planet, Prosperity"— Presentation transcript:

1 People, Planet, Prosperity
Programme of action for the World Summit on Sustainable Development 2002

2 DEVELOPMENT TRENDS

3 DEVELOPMENT TRENDS World population has doubled to 6,1 billion in last 40 years Population projected to grow to 9,3 billion over next 50 years All this growth will be in developing countries By ,2 billion people will be living in countries that cannot meet basic requirement of 50 litres of potable water per capita per day United Nations World Population Report 2001

4 DEVELOPMENT TRENDS Globally, infant mortality rates have fallen from 107 (per 1000 live births) in 1970 to 59 in 1998 – but rates are 10 times higher in developing countries than industrialised world Adult illiteracy has fallen from 41% in 1975 to 24% in 2000 Average per capita income has risen from $4332 in 1980 to $5595 in 2000 (in developing countries only, the increase has been from $989 to $1354) Draft WDR 2003

5 DEVELOPMENT TRENDS 1 billion people live on less than $1 per day
This figure has not changed since 1970, although poverty has decreased in percentage terms But since 1990 the number of poor has increased by an average of 10m per annum for Latin America, South Asia, sub-Saharan Africa Draft WDR 2003

6 DEVELOPMENT TRENDS 1,1 billion people are undernourished and underweight 1,5 billion people live in water scarce areas 1 billion people live on environmentally fragile lands 35 million people HIV positive 15,5 million people will die from HIV/AIDS in next 5 years in 45 most affected countries United Nations World Population Report 2001

7 ENVIRONMENTAL DEGRADATION
Land degradation Water scarcity Biodiversity loss Climate change

8 LAND DEGRADATION 30% of irrigated lands, 40% of rain fed areas and 70% of rangelands are severely degraded 20% of tropical forests cleared since 1970 Rain forests are being destroyed at the highest rate in history Drivers: agriculture, biomass energy, logging, infrastructure, climate change Draft WDR 2003

9 WATER SCARCITY 54% of available fresh water supplies are being used annually, two-thirds for agriculture Population growth will push this to 70% by 2025, and 90% if consumption in developing countries matches that of the developed world In developing countries 95% of sewage and 70% of industrial watse are dumped untreated into water courses 200 rivers cross international boundaries and 13 major rivers and lakes are shared by 100 countries United Nations World Population Report 2001

10 BIODIVERSITY LOSS 70% of fisheries depleted or fully exploited
Global fish stocks declining by t per year One third of all biodiversity squeezed to 1% of earth’s surface In % of world’s 4630 mammal species and 11% of the 9675 bird species were at significant risk of extinction One quarter of all plant species will be extinct by 2025

11 CLIMATE CHANGE Already breached CO2 absorptive capacity
Global temperatures project to increase by 3 – 5OC over next 50 years This will cause profound changes in habitat, biodiversity loss, droughts, floods and food security

12 GLOBALISATION Global economy Global society Global environment
Increasing inequality despite unprecedented productivity and capital accumulation Global society Unprecedented consumption and mobility by society but 1,1b people live in severe poverty Global environment Declining environmental assets are global concern; limited environmental rights of poor

13 A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE Global economy Global society Global environment
Global “equity”, balanced and stable development Global society Fulfilled, creative and productive world population Global environment Erosion of global environmental assets stabilised, biodiversity loss halted, consumption balanced with earth’s capacity to renew resources

14 A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE Poverty and inequality are greatest threat to sustainable global development in 21st Cent. Seriously tackling inequality will involve changes in developed-developing country relationship in terms of governance, trade, investment, debt relief Governments cannot do this alone – partnership with business, industry and civil society is critical A “Global deal” is needed to achieve a sustainable global economy, society and environment

15 “Global Deal” must achieve:

16 “Global Deal” must achieve:
Renewed commitment to the implementation of Agenda 21 Consumption and production patterns balanced with earth’s capacity to renew resources Environment managed as a global public good Implementation of global commitment to combat poverty for sustainable development

17 “Global Deal” must achieve:
Impact on economic factors underpinning marginalisation of Africa and developing world – trade, finance, investment Agreement to reform and replenish global financing mechanisms Resources, investment and finances committed to sustainable development agenda, and New Partnership for African Development

18 “Global Deal” must achieve:
Peace, security and stability Agreement on instruments to address gaps in international governance framework, and focus on capacity building for equitable global governance Legitimate and equitable national and international governance

19 “Global Deal” must achieve:
Johannesburg Programme of Action with clear commitments, targets, delivery mechanisms, resources and monitoring

20 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Trade Finance Investment Technology transfer SOCIAL Water Health Energy Education Food security ENVIRONMENT Oceans Atmosphere Biodiversity Land degradation Climate change

21 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT
ECONOMIC PROGRAMME COMMITMENTS Trade Finance Investment Technology transfer ENVIRONMENT Oceans Atmosphere Biodiversity Land degradation Climate change SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT Water Health Energy Education Food security

22 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMMES
BETTER ACCESS FOR DEVELOPING COUNTRIES TO GLOBAL MARKETS INCREASE INVESTMENT FOR DEVELOPING ECONOMIES RESOURCE COMMITMENT FROM DEVELOPMENT FINANCE INSTITUTIONS DEBT RELIEF PROGRAMME EXTENDED TO OTHER DEVELOPING COUNTRIES TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT & TRANSFER

23 TECHNOLOGY AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT
Building sustainable science and technology in Africa through domestic R&D spending and multi-national investment Equity, access and incentives in the global knowledge system Implementation of the S&T commitments in existing agreements Using S&T and innovation in sustainable trade

24 INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS
0,4% of Africans and South Asians have used internet vs. half of North Americans Enabling environments needed to encourage investment in hardware and tertiary education National e-strategies to address issues such as connectivity, regulatory environments, human capacity Extend Global Network Readiness initiative

25 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Trade Finance Investment Technology transfer ENVIRONMENT Oceans Atmosphere Biodiversity Land degradation Climate change SOCIAL PROGRAMMES Water Health Energy Education Food security

26 SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMMES
PROGRAMME FOR ACCESS TO SAFE WATER AND SANITATION ENERGY ACCESS PROGRAMME PUTS 50% AFRICAN HOUSEHOLDS ON INTEGRATED ENERGY GRID POA FOR SKILLS DEVELOPMENT & LITERACY ACCESS TO HEALTH CARE AND POA FOR HIV/AIDS & COMMUNICABLE DISEASES POA TO ENSURE INCREASED GLOBAL FOOD SECURITY

27 WATER One out of every 5 human beings lacks access to safe drinking water Target: halve the proportion of people unable to reach or afford safe drinking water by 2015 Global programme will require national strategies, greater financial investment and innovative technological solutions from public and private sectors

28 ENERGY 2 billion people lack access to commercial energy, contributing to poor productivity, deforestation and land degradation in developing countries Target: put 50% of African households on an integrated energy grid by 2015 Improve energy efficiency and expand access to commercial and renewable sources of energy

29 FOOD SECURITY Half the world’s extreme poor depend on farming and farm labour for their livelihoods Target: halve the proportion of people suffering from hunger by 2015 Assist communities to double agricultural productivity from the 2000 level by 2015

30 EDUCATION Target: achieve universal access to primary education by 2015, and eliminate gender disparities in primary and secondary education $9b per annum extra spending needed to achieve education target by 2015 = 0,14% of combined GNP of developing countries = 0,03% of global GNP “education for all” is achievable at global level along with other international development targets

31 HEALTH Targets: Halt and reverse the spread of HIV/AIDS by 2015 Reduce under-five mortality rate by two-thirds by 2015 Reduce maternal mortality rate by two thirds by 2015 $7 – 10b needed per annum for prevention and limited treatment of HIV/AIDS National strategies and financing plans to be adopted by 2003 for fighting HIV/AIDS Set national goals for reducing HIV prevalence among people aged 15 – 24 by 25% by 2005

32 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT
GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT PROGRAMMES Oceans Atmosphere Biodiversity Desertification Climate change ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Trade Finance Investment Technology transfer SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT Water Health Energy Education Food security

33 ENVIRONMENT COMMITMENTS
Environmental protection of the poor Greater commitment to developing country agendas Desertification Sustainable use of biodiversity New global instruments to address gaps Oceans and coasts Forests Waste Air pollution Ensuring better developing country engagement – “IEG” process

34 ENVIRONMENT PROGRAMMES
SUSTAINABLE USE OF NATURAL RESOURCES FOR DEVELOPMENT STRENGTHENING ENVIRONMENTAL GOVERNANCE MITIGATING GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE TO ACHIEVE TARGETS PROTECTING HUMAN RIGHTS THROUGH WASTE AND AIR POLLUTION REDUCTION

35 FORESTS

36 FORESTS Target: 50 m hectares of highly threatened forest areas to be protected by 2005 Priority forests for sustainable management: Congo Basin, Mozambique, Madagascar Russia Indonesia Amazon Basin Global certification system for legal logging

37 GOVERNANCE

38 GOVERNANCE Peace, democracy, security and stability are essential for sustainable development Enhance NAI programme for sound governance Strengthen coordination of the environmental, social and economic pillars of sustainable development Improve effectiveness of Commission for Sustainable Development Reform global governance for environment system

39 GLOBAL PARTNERSHIP WITH GOVERNMENTS
AROUND JHB PROGRAMME OF ACTION BUSINESS SECTOR CIVIL SOCIETY UN AGENCIES & DFIs

40 PARTNER CONTRIBUTIONS
GOVERNMENT Country strategies for sustainable development with matching state resources Create conducive implementation environment Engineering sub-regional and regional implementation agreements BUSINESS Agreement to tackle marginalisation of the poorest with “growth” agreements on trade, investment, financing, infrastructure linked to governance Adopt environmental and social auditing systems Proactive investment in sustainable development initiatives

41 PARTNER CONTRIBUTIONS
CIVIL SOCIETY Multiple actions to highlight environment and development problems An enabling, facilitatory and capacity building role within a global POA Promote participation of marginalised groups like women and youth DFIs & UN Agencies Prioritisation of Global POA in these institutions Offer of enabling financing agreements Inter-institutional co-ordination Mechanism to integrate IMF, WB, WTO, and other non-UN institutions Early agreement on roles, institutional arrangements and financing NB

42 JOHANNESBURG OUTPUTS

43 JOHANNESBURG OUTPUTS Global partnership to address inequality and poverty Johannesburg POA to deliver on WSSD outcomes incl Millennium Summit targets, with monitoring and delivery mechanisms, financing mechanisms, timeframes Integration of trade, finance and investment issues into sustainable development agenda Specific sectoral agreements and programmes

44 People, Planet, Prosperity

45 SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMMES
During 2nd half of ’90s developing countires spent 12 – 14% of national budgets on basic social services Donor countries spent 10 – 12% of aid budgets on social services Shortfall = $100b per annum


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