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Blueprint for Life/Work Designs www.blueprint4life.ca 1-888-533-5683.

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Presentation on theme: "Blueprint for Life/Work Designs www.blueprint4life.ca 1-888-533-5683."— Presentation transcript:

1 Blueprint for Life/Work Designs

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3 The Meaning of “WORK” “Work is undeniably one of the most essential of all human activities. For a start, it is the basis of economic survival of individuals… and society. Beyond this, an individual’s job structures much of her or his time and, one hopes, provides a source of personal fulfillment. An occupation also shapes one’s identity and, in the eyes of others, largely determines an individual’s status or position in society” Work, Industry, and Canadian Society, Krahn & Lowe. 1996

4 Most of Canada’s youth are likely to experience:
a succession of up to 25 different jobs in a variety of occupations in up to 5 different sectors of the economy a variety of concurrent work roles (multi-tasking) planned and unplanned gaps of “no work” they will need to manage numerous transitions between work and learning

5 Resource Benefits for using the Blueprint
Canada is shifting to a new and better paradigm for Career Development (Life/Work) that will address the current needs for the world of work. Learning to design one’s Life/Work more intentionally has the potential to save billions of dollars in both the private and public sectors. The Question… Can we afford to keep going along the way we are when we look at the current “transition around work” statistics ?

6 Loss of Productivity Reduction in International Competitiveness
64% of workers say they would start over again if they could over 50% of workers admitted they ended up in their current jobs through chance or the advice of others Canada’s second quarter GDP in 2002 was $1,138.2 billion a 1% increase in productivity would result in $11 billion + in goods and services Statistics Canada, CANSIM II, Consolidated federal, provincial, territorial, and local government revenue and expenditure, August 2002

7 Education Funding $64.1 billion was invested by all levels of Government on primary, secondary and post-secondary education almost 50% of post-secondary students drop out or change programs at the end of their first year almost 25% of secondary level students drop out of school prior to certified completion nationally * Poor recognition for school relevancy is the most commonly cited reason for “at risk” youth a 1% savings in increased efficiency equates to $640 million Statistics Canada, CANSIM II, Consolidated federal, provincial, territorial, and local government revenue and expenditure, August 2002

8 Health Care Funding over $76.9 billion invested by all levels of Government consider the impact of physical and emotional health (lost work days/stress) on citizens and families spending 1/2 their conscious in work environments they dislike if 1 out of every 100 people availing themselves to health care for potential stress related illness were happier and healthier in their work… $769 million annually could be saved Statistics Canada, CANSIM II, Consolidated federal, provincial, territorial, and local government revenue and expenditure, August 2002

9 Social Services $113 billion invested by all levels of Government.
inability to locate and maintain suitable and fulfilling learning and work opportunities is a major contributing factor for recipients. a 1% saving on investment equates to $1.13 billion Statistics Canada, CANSIM II, Consolidated federal, provincial, territorial, and local government revenue and expenditure, August 2002

10 Protection, Prisons and Corrections
over $15 billion invested by all levels of Government a contributing factor of many individuals running afoul of the law is the inability to connect with life and work roles that appeal to them a 1% reduction in expenditures equates to $150 million Statistics Canada, CANSIM II, Consolidated federal, provincial, territorial, and local government revenue and expenditure, August 2002

11 Training Investment Losses
on average, it costs approximately $25,000 to train someone to full productivity in a job thus, the average cost of 40 people changing jobs can directly and indirectly impact employers up to $1,000,000.00 annually, more than 4000 people change jobs, after 1 year or less in any moderate sized Canadian city direct and indirect costs could conservatively add up to more than $100 million nationally. Statistics Canada, CANSIM II, Consolidated federal, provincial, territorial, and local government revenue and expenditure, August 2002

12 Employment Insurance Human Resources Development Canada (HRDC) paid a total of $9.5 billion in the year ending March 31,2001 to about 650,000 EI Income Benefits Program recipients (who received an average of 18.5 weeks of payments) if Canadians were more self reliant and effective at managing their own work and learning opportunities in transition to and from work and learning, EI payments would decrease. a 1% improvement would equate to $95 million in saving. Statistics Canada, CANSIM II, Consolidated federal, provincial, territorial, and local government revenue and expenditure, August 2002

13 Lost Government Revenues
over $432 billion was collected by all levels of Government in the past year in revenues from income tax, property taxes, consumption taxes, health premiums, social insurance contributions, etc. if Canadians were more self reliant and effective at managing their own work and learning opportunities in transition to and from work and learning, all levels of government could anticipate increased revenues. a 1% improvement has the potential to generate $4.3 billion to government revenues. Statistics Canada, CANSIM II, Consolidated federal, provincial, territorial, and local government revenue and expenditure, August 2002

14 Costs of Career Indecisiveness
These figures suggest the magnitude of potential gains (assuming 1% in improvement) if Canadians were more self-reliant and better able to manage their work and learning opportunities (careers). While more difficult to quantify, non-monetary issues (such as reduced self-esteem, family breakdown, substance abuse, etc.), represent even greater costs to Canadian society. Statistics Canada, CANSIM II, Consolidated federal, provincial, territorial, and local government revenue and expenditure, August 2002

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16 Overview of the Blueprint Framework
3 Areas of the Blueprint: A. Personal Management B. Learning and Work Exploration C. Life / Work Building * A total of 11 Competencies fall under the 3 areas

17 The Big Picture

18 4-Stage Learning Process Taxonomy (at each of the four levels)
Acquisition Application Personalization Actualization

19 Stage I: Acquisition Student acquires knowledge and understands the knowledge acquired. This stage presents the student with the information that may later serve as the basis for behaviour, learning integration, and self-actualization.

20 Stage II: Application Student demonstrates acquisition by putting into action knowledge acquired. Moving from the dimension of know-ing into the dimension of know-how characterizes this stage.

21 Stage III: Personalization
Student integrates acquired and applied knowledge and re-examines and evaluates that knowledge. At this stage, student will either make the learning his/her own or reject it. Skill becomes part of who he/she is.

22 Stage IV: Actualization
At this stage, the student/graduate is approaching full potential. Transforming, inventing, conceptualizing and creating occur at this stage.

23 Résumé Writing Acquisition  Learning different résumé styles
Application  Personalization  Actualization  Learning different résumé styles Writing a résumé following a specific model Changing résumé to reflect new position Guiding others in writing résumés

24 Competency 8: Level 1: Explore and improve decision making.
Stage I ACQUISITION 8.1.1 Understand how choices are made. 8.1.2 Explore what can be learned from experiences. 8.1.3 Explore what might interfere with attaining goals. 8.1.4 Explore strategies used in solving problems. 8.1.5 Explore alternatives in decision-making situations. 8.1.6 Understand how personal beliefs and attitudes influence decision making. 8.1.7 Understand how decisions affect self and others.

25 Competency 8: Level 1: Explore and improve decision making.
Stage I ACQUISITION ( ) Stage II APPLICATION Assess what might interfere with attaining one’s goals. 8.1.9 Apply problem-solving strategies. Make decisions and take responsibility for them.

26 Competency 8: Level 1: Explore and improve decision making.
Stage I ACQUISITION ( ) Stage II APPLICATION ( ) Stage III PERSONALIZATION Examine one’s problem-solving strategies and evaluate their impact on the attainment of one’s goals. Evaluate the impact of personal decisions on self and on others.

27 Competency 8: Level 1: Explore and improve decision making.
Stage I ACQUISITION ( ) Stage II APPLICATION ( ) Stage III PERSONALIZATION ( ) Stage IV ACTUALIZATION Engage in a responsible decision-making process.

28 Competency 8: Explore and improve decision making.
Measurable Standards Competency 8: Explore and improve decision making. Level III: Engage in life/work decision making. Explore how being positive about the future and its uncertainties may lead to creative and interesting possibilities/alternatives. Possible standard for grade ten students: Students will be able to explain HB Gelatt’s 4 “rules of the road never taken” and describe a personal metaphor for their own life/work journey (river, sea, roller coaster, dice, etc.).

29 Objectives of the Blueprint:
To help individuals and organizations understand that career development is about growing through life and work. When intentional, career development is about actively creating the life one wants to live and the work one wants to do. Describe the career development competencies and indicators needed by Canadians in various stages of their lives to help individuals plan their Life/Work more intentionally. To help organizations promote and measure personal growth. Provide a common career development language across Canada.

30 What is the Planning Process for the Blueprint for Life/Work Designs?
The Blueprint is a national competency framework designed to help individuals better manage their lives and work. By suggesting a comprehensive Planning Process, the Blueprint also aims to help practitioners and organizations assess, develop and design programs, services and products that will help Canadians develop those competencies in the various settings in which career development interventions occur.

31 Blueprint Planning Process

32 The Question…? The question… Can we afford not to commit human and financial resources to develop a comprehensive Career Development culture ? WE need a concerted effort to: recognize that human resources are our single greatest resource, to increase our understanding of career development and it’s potential, use human resource research, tools and interventions more effectively, and to adopt a process for promoting, developing and tracking the benefits of a career development culture for Canadians.

33 The Question…? …continued The question… Can we afford not to commit human and financial resources to develop a comprehensive Career Development culture We need programs and resources based upon: clear measurable outcomes, accountability to the individuals, parents, businesses, organizations and the governments who benefit by fund them. WE need to recognize that: Career Development = Human Resource Development and better Economic Development

34 Blueprint for Life/Work Designs


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