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Adverbs. We do NOT use adjectives to describe verbs. We USE adverbs to describe verbs. Many adverbs are formed by adding the ‘ly’ ending to adverbs. Some.

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Presentation on theme: "Adverbs. We do NOT use adjectives to describe verbs. We USE adverbs to describe verbs. Many adverbs are formed by adding the ‘ly’ ending to adverbs. Some."— Presentation transcript:

1 Adverbs

2 We do NOT use adjectives to describe verbs. We USE adverbs to describe verbs. Many adverbs are formed by adding the ‘ly’ ending to adverbs. Some adverbs do not take ‘ly’ ending. They have the same form as adjectives. Adverbs Far Fast Hard High Last Late Long Low Near Straight

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5 Adverbs of Comparison

6 1. Comparative Adverbs When we compare the actions of two people, we use comparative adverbs. Use than after the comparative adverb. Example: Our English teacher leaves earlier than Our science teacher.

7 2.Superlative Adverbs When we compare the actions of more than two people, we use superlative adverbs. Use the before the superlative adjective. Example: Of all the competitors, he runs the fastest. Adverbs of Comparison

8 Regular Adverbs With one-syllable adverbs, we usually use ‘er’ and ‘est’ ending for their comparative and superlative forms. Comparative Adverbs Superlative Adverbs With one syllable adverbs, -er or –est are added Adverb + ‘er’ ending soon – sooner than late – later than Adverb + ‘est’ ending soon – the soonest Late - the latest

9 Regular Adverbs With two-syllable adverbs are formed by adding the ‘ly’ to adverbs ending for their comparative and superlative forms. Comparative Averbs Superlative Averbs With two- syllable adverbs, -ly are added More + Adverb + ‘ly’ carefully – more carefully Slowly – more slowly Most + Adverb + ‘ly’ carefully – most carefully Slowly – most slowly

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12 Irregular Adverbs Examples: David sang well at the concert. Sam sang better than him at the concert. Tim sang the best among them. Positive Adverbs Comparative Adverbs Superlative Adverbs Some adverbs are formed irregularly Well Badly Much Little Better Worse More Less Best Worst Most Least

13 REMEMBER! Since the ‘er’ ending and more are both forms of comparative adverbs, we CANNOT use them together. Since the ‘est’ ending and most are both forms of superlative adverbs, we CANNOT use them together. Example: They studied more harder than us. False They studied harder than us. True

14 Prepared by: Tan Eileen


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