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Michigan World Language Graduation Requirements & Assessments.

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Presentation on theme: "Michigan World Language Graduation Requirements & Assessments."— Presentation transcript:

1 Michigan World Language Graduation Requirements & Assessments

2 Michigan Merit Curriculum Credit/Experience Guidelines 1)Demonstrate a holistic level of Novice-High on the ACTFL Proficiency scale 2) Demonstrate basic knowledge of cultural practices, products, and perspectives of the culture(s) in which the language is used ;

3 3) Gain cultural knowledge as well as knowledge in other curricular areas using the world language; 4)Demonstrate a knowledge of the nature of language and culture through comparisons of the language studied and their own; 5) Use the language both within and beyond the school setting.

4 The Five Cs of Foreign Language from National Standards in Foreign Language Education

5 School districts can recognize the L2 requirement in a variety of ways: -offering a K-8 program which results in proficiency equal to the first two years of high school credit ; -have students complete the first credit in grade 6 or 7 and the second one by grade 8; -students complete the first credit in grade 8 and the second one during their high school years; -spread out the two credits over four school years (first credit in two academic years and the second in the following two years).

6 Which languages are recognized for credit? Languages we teach Languages we dont teach Languages that are signed Heritage languages or ones spoken at home Languages that arent written

7 What does this mean ? What are the implications for our area? For verification of proficiency:

8 For one credit: successful completion of the high schools first year summative assessment (e.g., final exam) at the Novice Mid level; or Novice Mid (Rating of 2) on the STAMP* (reading, writing, and speaking); or score equivalent to Level 1 on a national language organization exam, i.e. the American Association of Teachers of Spanish and Portuguese (AATSP) national Spanish exam; or score equivalent to European Level A1; or successful completion of a combination of district assessments AND commercially-prepared assessments at the Novice Mid level, i.e. SOPI* (listening and speaking), ELLOPA* (listening and speaking), SOPA* (listening and speaking), an OPI* (speaking), Signed Communication Proficiency Interview* (SCPI).

9 For a second credit in the same world language: successful completion of the second year summative assessment (e.g., final exam) at the Novice High level; or Novice High (Rating of 3) on the STAMP* (reading, writing, and speaking); or score equivalent to Level II on a national language organization exam, i.e. the AATSP* national Spanish exam; or score equivalent to European Level A2; or successful completion of a combination of district assessments AND commercially-prepared assessments at the Novice High level, i.e. SOPI* (listening and speaking), ELLOPA* (listening and speaking), SOPA* (listening and speaking), an OPI* (speaking), Signed Communication Proficiency Interview* (SCPI); or Portfolio that demonstrates all four skills.

10 Novice-High -Able to understand short sentences, particularly in context -Can understand words and phrases from simple questions, statements, high-frequency commands, and expressions of courtesy. -May need to hear the information repeated, rephrased, or spoken slowly. ACTFL STANDARDS - LISTENING For example: Listen to an authentic ad in the L2 and then, with a checklist, choose what is being talked about. DISCUSSION: How many of you would have the checklist in L1? L2? A mixture of L1 and L2? Where do you get authentic materials?

11 ACTFL STANDARDS - SPEAKING Novice-High - Relies heavily on learned expressions and can sometimes create their own questions or statements from this material with some signs of spontaneity. - Vocabulary centers on basic things, places, family connections. -Pronunciation may still be strongly influenced by L1. -Frequent errors, and may still have difficulty being understood by a sym pathetic native speaker.

12 Examples: Students are told they need to prepare for a scenario like the one below: Interpersonal: In the L1, tell the speaker to invite a friend to a party. Include the date, time, place and suggest what the person might want to wear. Presentational: i.e., a skit presented to an audience. DISCUSSION: Is this a whole class activity or one-on-one in a private area? Would you present this to be memorized or are you prompting the student with questions? Do you test on use of function(expressions used)? What do you consider accurate? Would you mark the student down if they didnt use the form taught?

13 ACTFL guidelines: ReadingNovice High -Can interpret practical written language. - When knows the vocabulary can read some items on menus, maps, signs, timetables when given instructions or directions learned, can read for instructional and directional purposes. - Can sometimes get meaning from more difficult material if supported by visual clues and other information.

14 Examples: Use authentic sources such as charts, menus, timetables or maps, and ask questions about the source in the L2. Discussion: Would you have the questions in the L1 or L2? How do you come up with a new supply of authentic sources?

15 ACTFL guidelines: Writing--Novice High - Can write simple, memorized statements and can re-arrange the statements to make limited, original communication. - Can give information on simple forms and documents such as names, numbers, own nationality, and also simple lists and short sentences. -Spelling and letters/characters may have some errors, but the student can write all the letters in an alphabetic or syllabic system, or characters or compounds in a character writing system.

16 Examples: - Using a website in the target language, choose a vacation spot. Write an to your teacher, telling her about a place you visited yesterday (past tense) and also talk about one you plan to visit in a couple of days (simple future or future). -After a short L2 reading activity, write a short summary of the reading, including as many details as possible. Discussion: Compare these two writing activities. What are the strengths of each? Would you have the students do both, or choose one of the above as a final assessment?

17 Group Activity Group 1: Recent college graduates in a World Language & those with training in ACTFL guidelines Group 2: Experience or training in SOPA, SOPI, ELLOPA, STAMP or other national organization exam Group 3: People who use portfolios

18 WORLD LANGUAGE TEACHER MEETINGS through TBAISD* Wednesday, January 13, 2010 Tuesday, March 16, 2010 Thursday, May 13, 2010 *TBAISD Administration Building – Leelanau Room 9 a.m.- 3 p.m.

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