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Chapter 9 Printed & Electronic Reference Sources

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1 Chapter 9 Printed & Electronic Reference Sources
California Specialized Training Institute Haz Mat Technician 1B Applied Chemistry Chapter 9 Printed & Electronic Reference Sources

2 Session Objectives The student will be able to:
Identify the four types of printed and electronic reference sources Describe the advantages and disadvantages of each reference source Utilize various reference sources to identify hazard and response information for the provided chemicals

3 Printed & Electronic Reference Sources
Can be into four types: Database - concentrates on specific property data Guidebook - action guides Specialty - a highly specific and narrow topic Regulatory - codes, regulations, ordinances, response plans

4 Electronic Data Reference Sources
Advantages: increasing amount of information available updated versions faster and less expensive less cumbersome are becoming faster, smaller, more powerful, more reliable, with greater storage capacities

5 Electronic Data Reference Sources
Advantages: peripherals enhance our ability to function notebook computers allow battery power wireless access to the evolving Internet more information available on Internet CD storage capacity for information more versatile and interactive software

6 Electronic Data Reference Sources
Disadvantages: corruption, crash or freeze problems easily damaged power outages connection problems data may not be current or reliable user proficiency

7 Printed and Electronic Data Reference Sources
Maintain backup power source Maintain current versions of printed references

8 Database Reference Sources
Contain vast amounts of technical data hundreds to thousands of chemicals Usually the most valuable for extracting specific chemical data Concentrate on chemical/physical properties May also cover toxicology reactivity other properties

9 Database Reference Sources
Other things you might find include: Common chemical terms Synonyms (cross-referencing common names, generic names, proper shipping names, etc.) Charts and graphs List of chemical manufacturers

10 Database Reference Sources
Chemicals may be arranged in many ways: in alphabetical order in a numerical order CAS number UN/NA number in an alphanumeric system to accommodate chemicals with isomers chemicals listed first alphabetically, then numerically

11 Database Reference Sources
Differ considerably from guidebook reference sources Do not usually contain action guides Can have their own areas of emphasis May have chapters dealing with a variety of additional topics Limitations of a particular reference source should not detract from its usefulness

12 Common Database Reference Sources
Dangerous Properties of Industrial Materials (Sax Manual) Hawley’s Condensed Chemical Dictionary CHRIS Manual, US Coast Guard NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards Merck Index Hazardous Materials Handbook (Pohanish) A Comprehensive Guide to the Hazardous Properties of Chemical Substances

13

14 Dangerous Properties of Industrial Materials
SAX Manual contains over 30,000 chemicals in 3 volumes each new edition adds about 2000 entries Synonyms, cross-indexed CAS numbers, cross-indexed DOT identification numbers, cross-indexed ACGIH Table of TLVs Table of abbreviations used in the manual

15 Dangerous Properties of Industrial Materials (Sax Manual)
Why so popular: Reliability, updated routinely Large size of database Relative ease of use Extensive information profile for most chemicals Good source of health and toxicological data

16 Dangerous Properties of Industrial Materials (Sax Manual)
Limitations: liberal use of abbreviations toxicity data is sometimes difficult to interpret spelling of some chemicals is complex molecular formula is presented in simplest form not the more informative expanded form C10H19O6PS2 Simple Molecular Formula SAX Manual (CH3O)2P(S)SCH(COOC2H5)CH2COOC2H5 Expanded Molecular Formula - Chemical Dictionary

17 Dangerous Properties of Industrial Materials (Sax Manual)
Other limitations No chemical protective clothing recommendations No evacuation suggestions No decontamination suggestions No emergency action guides or suggestions No neutralization or cleanup guidelines No container identification

18 Dangerous Properties of Industrial Materials (Sax Manual)
Other limitations No definitions of chemical terms and phrases Limited information on symptoms of exposure No first aid actions Limited information on antidotes or notes to physician No proper chemical names (some entries, such as malathion, are listed by generic name only)

19 Typical Entry for Arsenic

20 Dangerous Properties Of Industrial Materials (Sax Manual)
electronic version of the printed reference contains the same database well designed user friendly very fast

21 Dangerous Properties Of Industrial Materials (Sax Manual)
Excellent “search” capability: Chemical name or portion of name Synonym CAS Number Molecular weight Hazard class rating

22 Dangerous Properties Of Industrial Materials (Sax Manual)
Typical “search” or “query” window

23 Dangerous Properties Of Industrial Materials (Sax Manual)
Selected page

24

25 Hawley’s Condensed Chemical Dictionary
Contains about 5000 chemical entries Another 4000 chemical and physical terms Each new edition adds about 200 new listings Laid out very much like a dictionary Easy to use

26 Hawley’s Condensed Chemical Dictionary
Sections: Introduction - explains how to use the book Table of Abbreviations Table of the Origin of Chemical Terms Table of the History of Chemistry Table of Manufacturers of Trademark Products

27 Hawley’s Condensed Chemical Dictionary
Advantages: Reliability Thoroughness regarding chemical and physical properties Readability and ease of use Inclusion of terms, phenomenon, and process definitions Use of expanded molecular formulas Identifies typical uses of the substance in industry

28 Hawley’s Condensed Chemical Dictionary
Limitations: Very limited synonym listings for each entry Very limited toxicological data No chemical protective clothing recommendations No evacuation distances or suggestions No decontamination suggestions No emergency action and intervention guides No container descriptions and identification No first aid or antidote information

29 Typical Entry for Sulfur

30 Hawley’s Condensed Chemical Dictionary
electronic version of the printed reference contains same database as the printed manual well designed, user friendly and very fast

31 Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary
Excellent “search” capability: Chemical name or portion of name Synonym CAS Number Molecular weight Hazard class rating

32 Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary
A typical “query”

33

34 Chemical Hazard Response Information System (CHRIS Manual)
Commonly known as the CHRIS Manual Consists of three volumes, in very large three-ring binders A single chemical entry on one entire page Very detailed Contains some unique data fields

35 Chemical Hazard Response Information System (CHRIS Manual)
Contains 1300 very detailed entries new editions usually has only 20 new entries Chemicals in its database represent principally chemicals transported over water regulated by transportation standards For spills on water or that threaten waterways an excellent resource for chemical emergencies on land

36 Chemical Hazard Response Information System (CHRIS Manual)
Advantages: Reliability (data is accurate and thorough) Comprehensive detail on physical and chemical properties (considered the best) One full page dedicated to just one chemical Easy-to-use format design

37 Chemical Hazard Response Information System (CHRIS Manual)
Advantages: Contains some precautionary emergency action suggestions - highlighted in red Provides some health hazard information not available in other references Contains considerable information regarding reactive hazards, pollution, contamination

38 Chemical Hazard Response Information System (CHRIS Manual)
Includes special sections : Very detailed explanations of terms A chapter with conversion factors A separate table listing reactivity groups An index to synonyms Two main disadvantages database limited to water transportation chemicals difficult to read print

39 Chemical Hazard Response Information System (CHRIS Manual)
Electronic version Available on CD In ChemKnowledge In OREIS

40 Typical Entry for Hydrogen Chloride

41

42 NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards
Laid out in a table format referred to as the chemical listing Contains 700 chemical entries Updated every two to three years Each revision adds five to ten new entries

43 NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards
Features include: Explanation of abbreviations and terms used A personal protection and sanitation chart A chart of symbols, code components, and codes used for respirator selection A chart of abbreviations for symptoms of exposure and target organs A CAS number index A DOT I.D. number index A synonym and trade name index

44 NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards
Advantages: very reliable and easy and use. arranged in a pocket guide style lists ionization potential good source for PEL, TLV-TWA, and IDLH values has information on target organ effects.

45 NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards
Limitations: focus is on health-related data detailed physical and chemical properties are beyond the scope of its intent database is limited to just 700 chemicals difficult to read contains no emergency action guidelines.

46 NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards
Electronic version Available on CD In ChemKnowledge In OREIS

47 Typical Entry for MEK Peroxide & Xylene

48

49 The Merck Index Useful for medical information Can be technical
Appendix of radioactive isotopes and half lives Electronic version available on CD Very user-friendly Minimal instructions Tiny print

50 The Merck Index Typical display

51 Pohanish’s Hazardous Materials Handbook
Newcomer to the haz mat database style Contains a great deal of technical information Printed and electronic versions available

52 Pohanish’s Hazardous Materials Handbook
Searches include: Name or synonym CAS or DOT I.D. numbers NFPA or by label markings Properties or physical state Emergency response Chemical reactivity

53 Pohanish’s Hazardous Materials Handbook
Search screen

54 Pohanish’s Hazardous Materials Handbook
Typical entry

55 A Comprehensive Guide to Hazardous Properties of Chemical Substances
Also known as Comprehensive Guide to Haz Mat Chemicals 1,500 chemicals listed by chemical class Includes explosives, pesticides, nerve agents and radioactive substances

56 A Comprehensive Guide to Hazardous Properties of Chemical Substances
Indexes by chemical name or CAS # Some federal regulatory requirements Resource Conservation & Recovery Act (RCRA) Clean Water Act Safe Drinking Act Clean Air Act

57 A Comprehensive Guide to Hazardous Properties of Chemical Substances
General discussion on toxicity Listing of cancer causing chemicals Listing of chemically addictive substances Available only in printed version

58 A Comprehensive Guide to Hazardous Properties of Chemical Substances
Typical Entry 2.8 HYDRIODIC ACID DOT Label: Corrosive Material, UN 1787, UN 2197 Formula HI; MW ; CAS [ ] Composition: The acid is a solution of hydrogen iodide gas in water, available in various concentrations (57, 47, and 10%) Uses and Exposure Risk Hydriodic acid is used in the manufacture of iodides, as a reducing agent, and in disinfectants and pharmaceuticals. Physical Properties The acid is a colorless liquid, rapidly turning yellow or brown when exposed to light and air. The anhydrous hydriodic acid or hydrogen iodide is a colorless gas, fumes in moist air; decomposed by light; liquefies at –35oC; freezes at –51oC; extremely soluble in water, more so in cold water (900 g/100 mL at 0oC), soluble in may organic solvents. Hydriodic acid is a strong acid (the pH of a 0.1 M solution is 1.0) Health Hazard Hydriodic acid is a corrosive liquid that can produce burns on contact with the skin. Contact of acid with the eyes can cause severe irritation. The gas, hydrogen iodide, is a strong irritant to the eyes, skin, and mucous membranes. No exposure limit has been set for this gas. Fire and Explosion Hazard Hydrogen iodide is a noncombustible gas. Reactions with sodium, potassium, and other alkali metals and with magnesium can be violent. Hydrogen iodide is a reducing agent. Therefore, its reactions with strong oxidizing agents can be vigorous to violent. It ignites when mixed with fuming nitric acid, molten potassium chlorate, or other strong oxidizing compounds. When mixed with ozone, explosion may occur.

59 Guidebook Reference Sources
Known as Action Guides Focus on incident intervention activities Formatted to convey information in a narrative or paragraph form

60 Guidebook Reference Sources
Typical guidebook information: Incident intervention suggestions Incident objectives Isolation zones and evacuation suggestions Decontamination guidelines Neutralization, absorption, and/or dilution guidelines PPE selection (some specific CPC garments)

61 Guidebook Reference Sources
Typical guidebook information: Signs and symptoms of exposure First aid and advanced medical care Firefighting methods Fire extinguishing agents Violent reactive features Other precautionary statements

62 Guidebook Reference Sources
Contain little information on: physical and chemical properties chemical formulas toxicological data synonym cross-references Entries often alphabetical or alphanumeric order Some guidebooks are divided into several chapters

63 Guidebook Reference Sources
Some guidebooks provide good detail regarding reactivity with the wrong extinguishing agent other chemicals, water, or air Some provide information on PPE and CPC reliability varies

64 Common Guidebook Reference Sources
Emergency Response Guidebook (ERG) AAR Emergency Handling of Hazardous Materials NFPA Fire Protection Guide to Hazardous Materials Emergency Care for Hazardous Materials Exposure First Responder’s Pocket Guide to Hazardous Materials Emergency Response Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS)

65

66 Emergency Response Guidebook
DOT Guidebook or ERG Contains about 2400 entries closely following the list of industrial chemicals in “Table 101” of CFR Title 49. lists chemicals approved for U.S. transportation revised and updated every three or four years “Table of Initial Isolation and Protective Action Distances” was vastly improved in 1996

67 Emergency Response Guidebook
Features: Rail car identification chart Road trailer identification chart Hazard identification code chart Information on WMD chemicals Lewisite, Sarin, Soman and Mustard even though not regulated by DOT

68 Emergency Response Guidebook
Sections: White Pages - Instructions Yellow Pages - Numeric listing (UN ID numbers) of chemicals Blue Pages - Alphabetical listing of chemicals Orange Pages - The guide pages Green Pages - The Table of Initial Isolation and Protective Action Distances

69 Emergency Response Guidebook
Features: Layout and general design Easy to use Quick access to dependable information Concentrates on first responder information Highly respected isolation and evacuation table

70 Emergency Response Guidebook
Limitations: intended for immediate first responders identifies only most significant hazards contains limited exposure symptom info contains limited PPE/CPC recommendations does not contain information on chemical and physical properties molecular formulas or structural formulas molecular weights toxicological data

71 Emergency Response Guidebook
White page contents: Quick reference on reading shipping papers Instructions on how to use the ERG Explanation of the different sections Safety precautions Agencies to call for notification and assistance Overview of the hazard classification system Table of placards with initial response guides

72 Emergency Response Guidebook
White page contents: Rail car identification chart Road trailer identification chart Intermodal hazard identification codes Protective clothing overview Fire and spill control guidelines Information on use of WMD agents Glossary

73 Emergency Response Guidebook
Includes telephone assistance info: CANUTEC (Canada) CHEMTREC (United States) CHEM-TEL, Inc. INFOTRAC, Inc. 3E COMPANY, Inc. NRC operated by the U.S. Coast Guard Military resources SETIQ (Mexico) CECOM (Mexico)

74 Emergency Response Guidebook
Yellow pages

75 Emergency Response Guidebook
Blue pages

76 Emergency Response Guidebook
Orange pages - action guides or guide pages Listed in numerical order Identifies specific or generic hazards Most cover a group of similar chemicals Actions may not be appropriate for FROs

77 Emergency Response Guidebook
Three primary sections of orange pages: Potential Hazards Fire and Explosion * Health * Public Safety General Guidelines (not titled) Protective Clothing Evacuation Emergency Response Fire, Spill or Leak, First Aid

78 Emergency Response Guidebook
Orange pages Most guides cover chemical groups Not all of the information will be applicable not every recommended action is appropriate On most of the guides, isolation and evacuation are listed separately Isolation is covered in the general guidelines under “Public Safety,” Evacuation is listed under the subsection titled “Evacuation.”

79 Emergency Response Guidebook
Each guide has a special emphasis emphasis clearly indicated in the heading guides 115 through 126 all apply to gases guide 115 is for flammable gases guide 116 is for unstable flammable gases guide 117 covers extremely flammable, toxic gases

80 Emergency Response Guidebook
there are often subtle differences: some will caution against using specific extinguishing agents others don’t caution against these agents some advise to detain or isolate uninjured people others won’t

81 Emergency Response Guidebook
Orange pages

82 Emergency Response Guidebook
Green pages: Table of Initial Isolation and Protective Action Distances for highlighted chemicals chemicals listed by UN ID numbers Chemical listing are in two main columns one for small spills one for large spills each is broken down into three more columns

83 Emergency Response Guidebook
Evacuation columns identifies how far to isolate the scene downwind protection during the day downwind protection at night data based upon studies of releases Best isolation and evacuation distance recommendations chart

84 Emergency Response Guidebook
Green pages:

85 Emergency Response Guidebook
Electronic version available: on CD Internet sites ChemKnowledge Doubtful use by first responder, would use printed version

86

87 American Association of Railroads Emergency Handling of Hazardous Materials
The Railroad Guidebook or the AAR Book Specific information on various mitigation techniques and their subsequent consequences Emphasis on materials transported by rail

88 AAR Emergency Handling of Haz Mat
Nearly 2200 chemicals Chemicals approved for transportation by rail listed by proper shipping name in CFR Title 49, Table 101 Doesn’t contain separate guide pages Action guides under each chemical name

89 AAR Emergency Handling of Haz Mat
Four main sections: Recommendations for Initial Response keyed to DOT hazard class Commodity Specific Emergency Response UN Identification Numbers in an appendix STCC codes in an appendix

90 AAR Emergency Handling of Haz Mat
Recommendations for Initial Response last three chapter sections not available in other reference sources: description of DOT hazard classes Information on assessing tank car damage Instructions for Department of Energy - Department of Defense Escorted Shipments A table containing Standard Transportation Commodity Codes (STCC)

91 AAR Emergency Handling of Haz Mat
Commodity Specific Emergency Response comprises the bulk of the manual chemicals listed alphabetically each entry includes the following: DOT Hazard Class rating Four-digit UN identification number Brief description of the pure material Recommended immediate emergency actions

92 AAR Emergency Handling of Haz Mat
Limitations: information intended for first responders identifies only most significant hazards not detailed or complete evacuation recommendations are very brief chemicals are those approved for rail transport does not contain information on chemical and physical properties, chemical formulas, toxicological data, synonyms

93 American Association of Railroads

94

95 NFPA Fire Protection Guide to Hazardous Materials
NFPA Guidebook Highly popular among loading dock foremen and supervisors industrial facilities petrochemical plants environmental specialists hazmat teams

96 NFPA Guidebook Comprises three separate NFPA standards:
Hazardous Materials Data (NFPA 49) comprises the action guides portion of the book contains over 400 chemical entries Fire Hazard Properties of Flammable Liquids, Gases and Volatile Solids (NFPA 325) identifies physical and chemical properties of 1300 substances lists flammable substances only Manual of Hazardous Chemical Reactions (NFPA 491M) incompatible chemical lists for over 3500 substances arranged in a specialty reference style format

97 NFPA Guidebook Advantages: revised every two to three years
well investigated by NFPA standards committees reliable well designed and easy to use action guides are specific for each chemical action guides list NFPA 704 placarding numbers contains descriptions of typical containers

98 NFPA Guidebook Limitations: only about 400 chemicals listed
The Fire Hazard Properties section contains only fire-related chemical and physical data The Hazardous Chemical Reactions section difficult to interpret No toxicological data, detailed symptoms of exposures, or evacuation and isolation data

99 NFPA Guidebook – typical entry
1 4 oxy

100 NFPA Guidebook Fire Hazard Properties section
Hazardous Chemical Reaction section

101

102 Emergency Care for Hazardous Materials Exposure
Contains about 2200 entries closely corresponds to the ERG Divided into five main sections: Numerical index of chemicals by UN ID # Alphabetical index of chemicals Guidelines (action guides) Treatment protocols Drug protocols

103 Emergency Care for Hazardous Materials Exposure
Numerical and alphabetic indexes identify specific guidelines Guidelines 1 through 13 (the action guides) are indexed to DOT hazard classes remainder of the 109 guidelines are divided similar toxic effects and treatment modalities for example Guideline 25 is “Benzene and Related Compounds,” Guideline 49 is “Organophosphates Compounds,” Guideline 90 is “Cyanide and Related Compounds.”

104 Emergency Care for Hazardous Materials Exposure
Guidelines range from two to four pages Substance identification Routes of exposure Target organs Life threat Signs and symptoms by system Symptom onset for acute exposure Synergistic concerns

105 Emergency Care for Hazardous Materials Exposure
Guidelines also contain: Thermal decomposition products Medical problems possibly aggravated by exposure Decontamination Immediate first aid Basic treatment Advanced treatment Initial emergency department considerations Special considerations

106 Emergency Care for Hazardous Materials Exposure
Section 3 contains treatment protocols Section 4 contains drug protocols advanced life support (ALS) medications and specific antidotes Does not include chemical and physical properties chemical formulas chemical handling recommendations incident intervention suggestions

107 Emergency Care for Hazardous Materials Exposure – typical entry

108

109 The First Responder’s Pocket Guide to Hazardous Materials Emergency Response
Information on: terrorist events explosives incidents nuclear events Compact size, easy to use Contains a resource chapter Information and assistance phone numbers

110 The First Responder’s Pocket Guide to Hazardous Materials Emergency Response
Designed to supplement other resources Guidelines based on DOT hazard classes 14 chapters on recognition identification tactical considerations resources

111 The First Responder’s Pocket Guide to Hazardous Materials Emergency Response

112 Material Safety Data Sheets

113 Material Safety Data Sheets
MSDS Supplies information about a particular hazardous substance or mixture Required by labor Code, Title 8 and CFR 29 An MSDS must follow the standard format (Title 8) However, few look alike

114 Material Safety Data Sheets
Section I - Material/Manufacturer Identification Section II - Ingredients Section III - Physical Data Section IV - Fire and Explosion Hazard Data Section V - Health Hazard Data

115 Material Safety Data Sheets
Section VI - Reactivity Data Section VII - Spill or Leak Procedures Section VIII - Special Protection Information Section IX - Special Precautions

116 Material Safety Data Sheets
Limitations written toward preventing workplace exposures not sufficient to help in large spills vary widely in completeness and accuracy some are very old and out of date formatting can vary information differs between manufacturers

117 Material Safety Data Sheets
Advantages: Can identify special extinguishing methods they provide the manufacturer’s identity contain an emergency telephone number valuable for high proprietary or uncommon materials can help responders identify precursor chemicals

118 Genium’s MSDS Publisher of a three volume set of generic MSDS’s
It is available as a “one time” purchase Available with just the MSDS database Or can also be purchased with Genium’s Handbook of Safety, Health and Environmental Data.

119 Genium’s M.S.D.S. Example

120 Specialty Reference Sources
Deals with narrow or unique topics Information is more thorough than other references May be organized in alphabetic order (e.g., by chemical name) numerical order (e.g., by DOT specification number) or in some other logical sequence (e.g., by symptom or antidote)

121 Common Specialty Reference Sources
Crop Protection Handbook Quick Selection Guide to Chemical Protective Clothing GATX Tank Car Manual Handbook of Reactive Chemical Hazards Medical Management of Chemical Warfare Casualties

122

123 Crop Protection Handbook
Formerly Farm Chemicals Handbook Popular with: EPA waste site cleanup managers agricultural chemical handlers county agricultural commissioners Fish & Game officials regulatory compliance officers poison control centers health service organizations hazmat teams

124 Crop Protection Handbook
Features: All pesticides and fertilizers approved for use as of the publication date Pesticides currently in an experimental stage, but not yet approved Old, obsolete pesticides or pesticides voluntarily withdrawn from production “Restricted use” pesticides Some pesticides now banned (e.g., DDT)

125 Crop Protection Handbook
Advantages: numerous synonyms and trade names most comprehensive pesticide/fertilizer database easy to use extensive information for each listing valuable toxicological testing data information on chemical’s structural formula

126 Crop Protection Handbook
Advantages - it gives some: symptoms of poisoning when known antidote recommendations when known first aid measures when known CPC recommendations spill control suggestions cleanup suggestions for some entries

127 Typical Entry for Malathion

128 Crop Protection Handbook
Limitations: limited to pesticides and fertilizers limited physical properties information not a guidebook type database no information regarding evacuation, immediate scene isolation, and decontamination CPC selection info may not be totally accurate difficult to read

129

130 Quick Selection Guide to Chemical Protective Clothing
Data comes from laboratory testing NFPA standards ASTM ANSI requirements other criteria as appropriate Divided into two main sections an index with about 500 chemicals listed in alphabetical order responders first look up the target chemical then identify the class number (first column) refers them to the CPC selection guidelines page

131 Quick Selection Guide to Chemical Protective Clothing
Chemical Index Section

132 Quick Selection Guide to Chemical Protective Clothing
Second section identifies the permeation resistance provided by up to fifteen different CPC fabrics

133 Quick Selection Guide to Chemical Protective Clothing
Five time references: >8 = 8 hours or greater >4 = 4 hours or greater (up to 8 hours) 1-4 = 1 to 4 hours NR = Less than one hour Blank = Not tested against the substance Breakthrough times: greater than 4 hours considered excellent greater than 1 hour considered adequate

134 Quick Selection Guide to Chemical Protective Clothing
Limitations: only about 500 chemicals in its database second edition doesn’t cover chemical and biological warfare agents 2000 edition does

135

136 GATX Tank Car Manual Valuable for rail emergencies
The Commodity List is a database of about 350 chemicals Chemicals are listed alphabetically by proper shipping name Contains tank car specifications Identifies chemicals each type of tank can transported

137 GATX Tank Car Manual Classification Chart
numerical listing of all approved rail tank cars in order by DOT specification number includes a description of the tank car identifies the types of commodities

138 GATX Tank Car Manual DOT / AAR Stencil Drawing section
contains excellent detailed drawings of typical tank cars Tank Car Arrangement Drawings section a collection of silhouette drawings of each type of specification tank car arranged numerically by specification number includes detailed drawings of the dome and valves, plus capacity, weight, and length data.

139 GATX Tank Car Manual

140 GATX Tank Car Manual Tank Car Anatomy Drawing
showing dome cover valve connections, internal plumbing, bottom valves, sampling tubes, gauging devices, and pressure relief valves Instructions for Loading and Unloading contains some instruction Limitations: no chemical or physical property data no information about incident intervention no repair information

141

142 Handbook of Reactive Chemical Hazards
Also known as Bretherick’s Contains a list of about 4600 chemicals A compilation on dangerous reactions between incompatible chemicals Contains over 1950 pages Information regarding documented explosions and other chemical reactions is compiled from thousands of sources

143 Handbook of Reactive Chemical Hazards
Appendix 4: Index of Chemical Names starting point lists all of the chemicals in alphabetical order identifies where to look in the manual the four-digit numbers refer to specific entries in Section 1 of the manual

144 Handbook of Reactive Chemical Hazards
Section 1: Specific Chemicals contains the bulk of the information not in alphabetical order

145 Handbook of Reactive Chemical Hazards
Section 2: Classes, Groups and Topics provides incompatible and dangerous reactions data listed only by chemical category Appendix 2: Fire Related Data lists over 500 chemicals their flash points and explosive ranges

146 Handbook of Reactive Chemical Hazards
Limitations: challenging to use uses a lot of abbreviations limited chemical or physical properties doesn’t provide action guide information doesn’t cover toxicological data no first aid guidelines

147

148 Medical Management of Chemical Weapons Casualties
Pocket reference Only focus is chemical warfare agents Four important chapters: Casualty Management Decontamination Detection Equipment Appendix with numerous data charts

149 Medical Management of Chemical Weapons Casualties
Ten categories: Listing of specific chemical warfare agent in each section Summary of symptoms unique to each chemical warfare agent Detection capabilities Decontamination suggestions Immediate healthcare management

150 Medical Management of Chemical Weapons Casualties
Ten categories: Long-term healthcare management Antidote information Method of toxicity for each chemical Target organs for each chemical Detailed listing of symptoms for each chemical

151 Medical Management of Chemical Weapons Casualties

152 Medical Management of Chemical Weapons Casualties
Rear of book contains charts and tables toxicity chemical properties physical properties

153 Regulatory References
Address the following: Manufacturing safety (products/ containers) Packaging restrictions Labeling, placarding, container markings, stenciling Transportation safety Product transfer, product movement through closed systems Response personnel training, minimum standards

154 Regulatory References
Address the following: Employee safety standards Employee competency standards Notification, reporting, and documentation of releases and accidents Pollution control, on- and off-site airborne monitoring Cleanup issues, compliance Disposal regulations, marking, containerizing, transportation

155 Regulatory References
Often overlooked Aid in making better decisions incident management techniques to apply required resources degree of investigation reduce potential liability

156 Regulatory References
Three sub-types of regulatory codes : restrictive (conforming) voluntary (consensus) self-imposing

157 Restrictive Regulatory References
“minimum standard” or minimum level of required compliance establish a uniform standard are mandatory (compliance is required) Violations and noncompliance citations fines jail terms Often written by a government entity

158 Restrictive Regulatory References
Address product manufacture: substance handling container manufacture transportation pollution control (air, water, and soil) cleanup employee training

159 Voluntary Regulatory References
Written by a service organization NFPA (National Fire Protection Association). Do not automatically become laws Must be “adopted” by a local governmental entity to become mandatory This is called “self-compliance by consensus.”

160 Self-Imposing Regulatory References
Codes, ordinances, and response plans written by cities and counties Outline public service agency activities particularly where no national standards exist or don’t address all of an agency’s needs Attempt to ensure uniformity agency function employee conduct

161 Regulatory Reference Examples:
CFR Title 49, Transportation, Sections 1 through 199 (Transportation of Hazardous Materials) NFPA 472: Standard for Professional Competencies of Responders to Hazmat Incidents Hazardous Materials Emergency Response Plan (a self-imposing regulation written by an individual agency)

162 Restrictive Regulatory References
Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Title 49 written by U.S. Department of Transportation regulates nearly all aspects of hazmat transport Manufacture of containers Markings on containers and transport vehicles Correct packaging methods What can and cannot be transported Materials banned from transportation The DOT marking system (labels and placards) Shipping documents The Emergency Response Guidebook (ERG)

163 Restrictive Regulatory Reference CFR Title 49

164 Restrictive Regulatory Reference CFR Title 49
Table 101 lists 2300 chemicals Listed by proper shipping name Table is revised about every year Table 101 lists the following information: Proper shipping name Hazard class designation UN identification number DOT label requirement Packaging requirements

165 Restrictive Regulatory Reference CFR Title 49
Can be used to: Verify that shipping documents are correct (spelling, quantities, types of packaging) Determine if placarding or labeling is correct Determine if incompatibles were transported Verify proper packaging and packaging markings

166 Voluntary Regulatory References
NFPA 472, Standard for Professional Competence of Responders to Hazardous Materials Incidents A voluntary, or consensus, code Revised every five years Not mandatory until adopted Lists minimum competencies performance capabilities

167 Voluntary Regulatory References NFPA 472

168 Self-Imposing Regulatory References
Haz Mat Emergency Response SOPs Ranges from about four to eight pages

169 Blended Reference Sources
Contain elements of databases, guidebook and specialty reference sources Examples: ChemKnowledge CAMEO OREIS

170 ChemKnowledge Formally TOMES
Toxicology, Occupational Medicine and Environmental Series Contains 18 separate databases Represents over 8,000 substances. Concentrates on toxicological, medical and/or environmental data.

171 ChemKnowledge Can search by:
chemical name, a portion of a name, a synonym chemical formula CAS Number or DOT I.D. Number some toxicological data symptoms and physical descriptions

172 ChemKnowledge Chemical Screen

173 ChemKnowledge Toxicology Screen

174 ChemKnowledge Has a unique “cross reference” feature
will indicate other databases with information can then “tab” between that databases Reports vary from one to over 50 pages

175 CAMEOfm Computer Aided Management of Emergency Operations (File Maker)
Written and produced by NOAA Distributed by the National Safety Council Available by download off internet Accompanied by a comprehensive set of instructions

176 CAMEOfm Consists of three modules CAMEOfm - chemical database
ALOHA - plume generation MARPLOT - mapping

177 CAMEOfm The CAMEOfm Module Over 4,000 chemicals in database
includes physical, chemical and toxicity data utilizes some of the data for ALOHA allows the user to add to the database all critical technical data must be included includes Chemical Reactivity Worksheet

178 CAMEOfm Chemical Database

179 CAMEOfm Unique features: Contains some Action Guide information
Can add schematic drawings and pre-fire plans Allows photographs of facilities to be added Allows listing by address of “target hazard” Allows the implant or positioning of “icons” Allows for the overlay of a calculated gas or vapor plume

180 CAMEOfm Chemical Information Screen

181 CAMEOfm Response Information Data Sheet (RIDS)

182 Chemical Reactivity Worksheet
From CAMEO producers, NOAA allows users to research chemical incompatibilities Information is then provided to the user about: reaction products reactive materials and chemical groups Can compare only two chemicals at a time

183 Chemical Reactivity Worksheet

184 ALOHA Area Locations of Hazardous Atmospheres
Once all inputs are completed, will: calculate a plume determine size of plume display (overlay) a plume onto a selected map overlay can be modified and adjusted Based on reliable gas-vapor calculation methods

185 ALOHA ALOHA Module – Cautions, limitations

186 Chemical Plume Footprint
ALOHA Chemical Plume Footprint

187 ALOHA Plume Footprints and Concentration Graphs

188 MARPLOT Mapping Application for Response Planning and Local Operational Tasks available separately The user must download local maps The user can then: select specified maps zoom in and out and move on a map overlay mark and relocate the “point of release” overlay the plume cloud onto the map re-position, re-generate and adjusted the size.

189 MARPLOT ALOHA Plume Footprints and Concentration Graphs in MARPLOT

190 OREIS Operation Respond Emergency Information System
Aid for incidents occurring along North American highways and rails From Operation Respond Institute Contains database references, guidebook references and specialty reference databases

191 OREIS Databases: Railcar and Motor carrier ID databases
UN ID # database Placard displays Chemical databases AAR CHRIS NIOSH Pocket Guide Passenger train schematics

192 OREIS Databases:

193 Summary Identified the types of printed/electronic reference sources
Described the advantages and disadvantages of each reference source Utilized various reference sources to identify hazard and response information for the provided chemicals


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