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Cost of Quality Childcare Survey Analysis February 2012.

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Presentation on theme: "Cost of Quality Childcare Survey Analysis February 2012."— Presentation transcript:

1 Cost of Quality Childcare Survey Analysis February 2012

2 Overview Section 1: Staff Salaries and Benefits Number of staff, average hours worked/week, hourly wage, annual salary Substitute teacher use and cost, total amount spent on supervision Healthcare, Unemployment Insurance, and Fringe Benefits Section 2: Professional Development Courses/programs, materials, staffing costs, release time 2

3 Overview Section 3: Occupancy Costs Quality of space, geographic location, tenure status Occupancy costs, upkeep, subsidized costs/services Section 4: Curriculum and Assessment Spending on curriculum materials and assessment tools Hours devoted to curriculum preparation and administering/scoring student assessments 3

4 Overview Section 5: Classroom Materials General classroom expenses, new or used purchases Personal care, food-related, computer-related expenses Janitorial services, cleaning-related duties Section 6: Other Expenses Other miscellaneous expenses Parent outreach/involvement 4

5 Respondent Profile 379 respondents (after removing all duplicates, incomplete or invalid responses) 22.8% response rate Program classifications 57% center-based or school-based programs 36% family child care programs 7% after-school or out of school time programs Enrollment by age group Infants: average 5.5 enrolled, median 3 Toddlers/preschool: average 35.8 enrolled, median 19 School-age: average 40.4, median 8.5 5

6 Section 1: Staff Salaries and Benefits Number of Direct Service Staff For the director and assistant director positions, a strong majority of respondents employ just one staff member. Conversely, half of respondents indicated that between two and 11 staff members are employed in the teacher position, with a group average of approximately nine teachers on staff. 6 Director Assistant Director Teacher Assistant Teacher Classroom Support Administrative Support Count Mean Minimum st Quartile Median rd Quartile Maximum

7 Section 1: Staff Salaries and Benefits Hours Worked Per Week Directors, assistant directors, and teachers were most likely to work full time (40 hours per week) or close to it, while assistant teachers, classroom support, and administrative support typically appeared to work on a part-time basis. 7 Director Assistant Director Teacher Assistant Teacher Classroom Support Administrative Support Count Mean Minimum st Quartile Median rd Quartile Maximum

8 Section 1: Staff Salaries and Benefits Hourly Wage Respondents reported higher average hourly wages for administrative support and directors, followed by classroom support and assistant directors. 8

9 Section 1: Staff Salaries and Benefits Average Hourly Wage Some of the highest average hourly wages are observed for administrative support in central city locations and after-school programs ($24.30 and $24.04) as well as directors in town locations and center-based or school-based programs ($22.86 and $22.16). Some of the lowest average hourly wages were for assistant teachers in rural settings and family child care programs, as well as assistant directors in family child care programs. 9 Director Assistant Director Teacher Assistant Teacher Classroom Support Admin. Support After-School or Out of School Time Program $19.81$15.10$11.58$9.62$15.50$24.04 Center-Based or School-Based $22.16$17.83$13.78$10.33$19.06$22.16 Family Child Care Program $16.14$9.33$12.67$9.43$10.85$22.80 Central City $21.53$18.06$13.07$10.51$15.53$24.30 Rural $18.42$18.48$12.13$9.37--$19.30 Suburban $18.46$15.38$14.42$10.72$20.33$18.89 Town $22.86$17.08$13.19$9.95$17.53$21.51

10 Section 1: Staff Salaries and Benefits Annual Salary Again, the highest average salaries, as demonstrated by the group mean and median, were observed among directors and administrative support staff. 10

11 Section 1: Staff Salaries and Benefits Average Annual Salary Administrative support staff and directors are among the highest paid, most notably in after-school programs and family child care programs (administrative support), center-based or school-based programs (directors), and central city locations (highest for all positions). 11 Director Assistant Director Teacher Assistant Teacher Classroom Support Admin. Support After-School or Out of School Time Program $43,317$30,964$19,469$18,061$24,980$50,001 Center-Based or School-Based $51,129$39,605$30,373$17,425$32,161$46,181 Family Child Care Program $39,869$23,075$34,200$14,104$8,508$50,306 Central City $57,356$40,496$34,767$20,178$30,836$51,804 Rural $43,920$40,509$31,438-- $35,686 Suburban $44,780$34,300$33,250$17,741$2,500$28,104 Town $45,013$35,503$26,218$12,830$1,500$45,039

12 Section 1: Staff Salaries and Benefits Substitute Teacher Use and Cost Responses varied for the average number of days substitutes were used: the group median was 20, while the group average was 54. Conversely, over half of respondents indicated that the average cost of a substitute for one day of work was between $50 and $96, with a group median and mean of $72 and $78, respectively. 12 Number of Days Substitutes Were Used Average Cost of a Substitute for One Day of Work Count Mean54$78 Minimum1$5 1 st Quartile5$50 Median20$72 3 rd Quartile60$96 Maximum300$688

13 Section 1: Staff Salaries and Benefits Supervision Spending Total spending on supervision Mean: $110,397 Median: $34,000 Mid-50%: $5,000-$100,000 13

14 Section 1: Staff Salaries and Benefits Benefits Teachers and directors were the most likely to receive all three types of benefits, and healthcare benefits tended to be the most common benefits received across the board. 14

15 Section 1: Staff Salaries and Benefits Benefits The highest average amounts were spent on healthcare benefits for teachers, fringe benefits for classroom support, and fringe benefits for teachers. Overall, unemployment insurance benefits had the lowest average annual amounts across all position categories. 15

16 Section 1: Staff Salaries and Benefits Average Total Benefits Facilities based in central city locations had the highest total amounts for all benefits, most notably fringe benefits ($87,815) and health benefits ($66,661). The lowest average total benefits appear to be centered on unemployment benefits, which had some of the lowest total amounts overall, and among programs in rural locations. 16 Total Health Benefits Total Unemployment Benefits Total Fringe Benefits After-School or Out of School Time Program $25,211$13,572$63,172 Center-Based or School-Based $51,122$14,818$42,821 Family Child Care Program $16,716$13,267$19,777 Central City$66,661$22,266$87,815 Rural$22,739$6,468$5,844 Suburban$42,722$5,298$32,343 Town$34,491$9,935$20,638

17 Section 2: Professional Development Spending Teachers and directors were the most likely to benefit from spending on professional development courses and/or programs (based on number of respondents – see accompanying report). Overall, spending on professional development courses and/or programs appears to be highest for classroom support staff and teachers. 17

18 Section 2: Professional Development Spending Again, teachers and directors were the most likely to benefit from spending on professional development materials (based on number of respondents – see accompanying report). On average, teachers received the highest average amounts of spending on professional development materials, while the values were generally comparable across the other four direct service positions. 18

19 Section 2: Professional Development Spending Of the five categories, the most common type of professional development for which spending was reported was professional development for licensing requirements (count shown in accompanying report), while the highest group mean was for college-level courses. 19

20 Section 2: Professional Development Staffing Costs When asked to indicate how much their facility spends each year on instructors hired to teach professional development courses, half of the 114 respondents who answered this question provided a response of between $300 and $1,875, with a group mean of $2,393. When asked how much their facility spends each year on staffing costs associated with covering staff who are participating in professional development courses or programs, half of the 97 respondents reported spending between $300 and $2,000 for these staffing costs, with a group mean of $1,

21 Section 2: Professional Development Release Time When asked about the number of hours available in professional development release time each year for direct service staff, all positions received roughly similar amounts of release time, with classroom support staff and teachers receiving a few more days for professional development, on average. 21

22 Section 2: Professional Development Average Total Spending and Release Time Some of the highest average costs were in central city locations (courses/programs and other costs) and among after-school or out of school time programs (other costs). Professional development materials appear to have very low levels of spending, most notably among rural and town locations and family child care programs. Central city locations appear to allow for the most professional development release time, while rural locations seem to allow the least. 22 Courses and Programs Materials Other PD Costs Release Time (Hours) After-School or Out of School Time Program $4,394$1,398$4, Center-Based or School-Based $4,365$1,118$4, Family Child Care Program $1,476$1,023$1, Central City$6,552$1,436$5, Rural$1,083$380$2, Suburban$2,533$1,101$3, Town$1,821$1,001$1,

23 Section 3: Occupancy Costs Quality of Space Class A buildings are the most prestigious buildings competing for premier office users with rents above average for the area. Buildings have high quality standard finishes, state of the art systems, exceptional accessibility and a definite market presence. Class B buildings compete for a wide range of users with rents in the average range for the area. Building finishes are fair to good for the area. Building finishes are fair to good for the area and systems are adequate, but the building does not compete with Class A at the same price. Class C buildings compete for tenants requiring functional space at rents below the average for the area. 23

24 Section 3: Occupancy Costs Geographic Location The most common response was town, at 42.9 percent of respondents, followed by central city at 29.1 percent. 24

25 Section 3: Occupancy Costs Tenure Status Own: tenant is the sole owner of all facility properties Rent: a short-term agreement with a landlord that can be changed or amended on a regular basis Lease: a long-term contract with a landlord renting land and buildings to a tenant 25

26 Section 3: Occupancy Costs Property Owners 26 Large-Scale Maintenance Projects Utilities Classroom Play Spaces or Environments Count Mean $10,398$14,170$2,983 Minimum $50$200$50 1 st Quartile $1,275$3,000$500 Median $3,000$5,000$1,000 3 rd Quartile $10,000 $2,125 Maximum $100,000$228,900$35,000 PaintingFurnitureEquipment Cooking Supplies Small Repairs & Renovations Count Mean $983$1,292$1,666$729$2,742 Minimum $10$50 $15$100 1 st Quartile $200$213$300$100$475 Median $350$500 $400$800 3 rd Quartile $1,000$1,800$2,000$925$2,000 Maximum $8,000$7,500$11,090$5,000$45,000

27 Section 3: Occupancy Costs Property Renters 27 RentUtilities Classroom Play Spaces or Environments Count 4029 Mean $48,044$17,884$4,878 Minimum $1,000$500$100 1 st Quartile $12,900$2,000$600 Median $18,600$4,320$1,000 3 rd Quartile $36,000$9,360$3,000 Maximum $600,000$300,000$62,000 PaintingFurnitureEquipment Cooking Supplies Small Repairs & Renovations Count Mean $3,735$3,587$3,531$24,610$3,553 Minimum $100 $25$100 1 st Quartile $250$500 $200$300 Median $500$1,100$1,000$300$806 3 rd Quartile $1,000$2,000 $600$2,717 Maximum $61,500 $400,000$61,500

28 Section 3: Occupancy Costs Property Lessees 28 RentUtilities Classroom Play Spaces or Environments Count Mean $70,044$18,547$3,771 Minimum $1,500$300 1 st Quartile $20,000$2,450$1,000 Median $39,000$8,000$2,000 3 rd Quartile $98,801$19,437$4,625 Maximum $368,000$160,008$21,113 PaintingFurnitureEquipment Cooking Supplies Small Repairs & Renovations Count Mean $1,370$1,792$2,381$1,065$3,631 Minimum $100 1 st Quartile $300$500 $213$1,000 Median $700$1,250$1,500$425$1,700 3 rd Quartile $2,000$2,375$3,000$1,375$5,000 Maximum $6,000$8,000$20,000$5,000$30,000

29 Section 3: Occupancy Costs Utilities Lessees and renters had higher mean values for utilities than owners, at $18,547 and $17,884 in annual costs, respectively. 29

30 Section 3: Occupancy Costs Classroom Play Spaces/Environments Renters had the highest mean values for spending on classroom play spaces and environments, while owners had the lowest mean value. 30

31 Section 3: Occupancy Costs Subsidized Costs/Services Renters and lessees were asked if rent, utilities, or repair, renovation, and maintenance services were subsidized for or donated to their facility. The most common item (23.3 percent of respondents) to be subsidized or donated to lessees was repair, renovation, and maintenance services. Conversely, rent and repair, renovation, and maintenance services were subsidized or donated to nearly one- fifth of renters. Populations include 52 renters and 69 lessees. 31

32 Section 3: Occupancy Costs Average Total Occupancy Costs Owners have some of the lowest overall costs in all cases except among after-school programs. Conversely, renters and lessees had the highest total occupancy costs, especially among center-based or school-based programs and in central city locations. 32 OwnersRentersLessees After-School or Out of School Time Program $81,390$18,122$83,800 Center-Based or School-Based $38,208$113,556$89,757 Family Child Care Program $10,401$18,677$34,700 Central City$45,791$218,845$140,357 Rural$15,740$34,666$67,751 Suburban$22,952$70,233$70,535 Town$16,641$36,083$41,773

33 Section 4: Curriculum and Assessment Spending Typical spending was considerably higher for curriculum materials than for assessment tools, and the group mean for curriculum materials was more than double the group mean for assessment tools. 33 Curriculum MaterialsAssessment Tools Count Mean $4,502$1,996 Minimum $50$20 1 st Quartile $500$195 Median $1,000$325 3 rd Quartile $3,500$1,000 Maximum $230,000

34 Section 4: Curriculum and Assessment Hours Devoted to Curriculum Preparation In general, it appears that directors, assistant directors, and teachers all dedicate approximately the same amount of time to curriculum preparation (average of around eight hours each week) while assistant teachers devote an average of 5.3 hours each week. 34 DirectorAssistant DirectorTeacherAssistant Teacher Count Mean Minimum st Quartile 3332 Median rd Quartile 10 5 Maximum

35 Section 4: Curriculum and Assessment Hours Devoted to Assessments The mean value for assistant directors was highest at 5.3 hours each week, followed by teachers (5.1 hours) and directors (4.8 hours). 35 Director Assistant Director Teacher Assistant Teacher Count Mean Minimum st Quartile Median rd Quartile 5555 Maximum

36 Section 4: Curriculum and Assessment Average Spending and Hours Devoted For spending, central city facilities had the highest average total amount, while family child care programs spent the least on average. Greater amounts of time were typically devoted to curriculum preparation in after-school or out of school time programs and in central city locations, while much less time was devoted to administering and scoring student assessments in after-school or out of school time programs and in family child care programs. 36 Total Spending Curriculum Preparation (Hours) Assessments (Hours) After-School or Out of School Time Program $10, Center-Based or School-Based $8, Family Child Care Program $1, Central City$11, Rural$2, Suburban$3, Town$4,

37 Section 5: Classroom Materials Spending Art materials received the highest group mean spending amount, followed by materials to support language and literacy and materials for gross motor development. Interestingly, the group medians for all classroom expenses (excluding art materials) were between $173 and $250, indicating that the middle ranges of values for all expenses were somewhat similar. 37

38 Section 5: Classroom Materials Used or Second-Hand Purchases Over half of respondents purchased less than 10 percent of these classroom materials second-hand or used. Childcare providers that purchased more than 75 percent of these items second-hand or used constituted just 6 percent of the sample. 38

39 Section 5: Classroom Materials Personal Care Routines Annual spending on cots and bedding typically ranged from $100 to $500, with a group average of $891, making it the least costly material related to personal care routines. Toileting and diapering was the most expensive, with half of respondents indicating that their facility spent between $150 and $1,000, and a group average of $1,

40 Section 5: Classroom Materials Food-Related Expenses The most costly food-related expense appeared to be the cost of staff to provide food, which had a group average of $20,323. Although just 65 respondents indicated that this expense was applicable, half of those respondents reported paying between $2,000 and $20,462. Snacks were the least costly food-related expense, which cost half of respondents between $1,000 and $5,000 and had a group average of $4,

41 Section 5: Classroom Materials Food Allowance from CACFP A total of 148 respondents indicated that they do receive a food allowance from the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP), which amounts to 56 percent of respondents who answered this question. The amount received typically ranged from $300 to $23,250, and the group average of $26,749 suggests that there were several facilities receiving very large amounts from CACFP. 41 Amount Received from CACFP Count128 Mean$26,749 Minimum$300 1 st Quartile$3,000 Median$6,000 3 rd Quartile$23,250 Maximum$335,694

42 Section 5: Classroom Materials Computer-Related Expenses and Office Supplies Although budgets for office supplies appeared to be somewhat higher than the three types of computer-related expenses overall, the group average for IT support is by far the highest of the four, most likely because of several facilities budgeting very large amounts of funding for this expense. 42

43 Section 5: Classroom Materials Average Total Spending The highest amounts of spending tended to be in central city locations and center-based or school-based programs, especially for food-related and computer-related expenses. The lowest amounts of spending were in the areas of personal care spending (especially family child care programs, after-school programs, and rural locations) and computer-related expenses (specifically in family child care programs and town-based facilities). 43 Learning Materials Personal Care Spending Food-Related Expenses Computer- Related Expenses After-School or Out of School Time Program $4,751$1,519$19,156$7,968 Center-Based or School-Based $10,863$4,487$34,594$27,731 Family Child Care Program $2,162$877$7,693$1,024 Central City$16,824$6,638$57,854$49,460 Rural$3,439$1,237$7,866$1,725 Suburban$3,260$1,744$15,190$1,925 Town$3,641$1,599$10,106$1,580

44 Section 5: Classroom Materials Janitorial Services and Spending When asked if their facility employs a janitor or contracts with a janitorial service, slightly over half of respondents answered affirmatively (132 yes versus 129 no). Facilities that use a janitor or janitorial service budget a considerably higher amount for these services than facilities without janitorial services spend on cleaning supplies. 44 Amount Budgeted for Janitorial Services No Janitorial Services: Amount Spent on Cleaning Supplies Count Mean $18,339$841 Minimum $20$30 1 st Quartile $4,000$250 Median $10,000$450 3 rd Quartile $20,000$700 Maximum $230,000$9,500

45 Section 5: Classroom Materials Average Spending on Janitorial Services and Cleaning After-school or out of school time programs and central city-based facilities appeared to spend the most on janitorial services, while center- based or school-based programs and rural-based facilities spent the most on cleaning supplies. 45

46 Section 5: Classroom Materials Cleaning-Related Duties Directors and teachers were most likely to perform any cleaning-related duties (count of responses not shown here). Interestingly, all four direct service positions typically spent the same amount of time performing these duties: across all job categories, the middle-50 percent of responses were in approximately the same range. The group means, however, indicated that teachers and directors may have spent more time performing cleaning-related duties. 46

47 Section 6: Other Expenses Miscellaneous Spending The widest middle 50-percent ranges of values were provided for transportation and administrative office supports, and the highest group means were for administrative office supports, transportation, and licensing fees. 47

48 Section 6: Other Expenses Parent Outreach and Involvement The highest group median value was for parent nights ($400), while the highest group mean was for home visits ($3,300). 48

49 Section 6: Other Expenses Parent Outreach and Involvement Both parent outreach/communications and other spending, which includes items such as advertising, accountants, and transportation, were highest in central city locations and in center-based or school-based programs, and were lowest at family child care programs. 49 Other ExpensesParent Outreach After-School or Out of School Time Program $76,023$2,783 Center-Based or School-Based$100,508$5,351 Family Child Care Program$2,150$459 Central City$193,134$7,132 Rural$10,127$1,417 Suburban$14,991$3,178 Town$12,098$1,473


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