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Total Force >.  The Total Force  Reserve Categories  Structure and Organization  Force Contributions  Accessibility Overview 2.

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Presentation on theme: "Total Force >.  The Total Force  Reserve Categories  Structure and Organization  Force Contributions  Accessibility Overview 2."— Presentation transcript:

1 Total Force >

2  The Total Force  Reserve Categories  Structure and Organization  Force Contributions  Accessibility Overview 2

3  1653, Oliver Cromwell overthrows British Parliament  Legitimate need for national defense  Who should rise up if we have no standing army?  The militia created 1780s  Grew into the National Guard and the Reserve Forces History 3

4  Evolved as official policy in 1970s  Aug 1970—The Total Force Concept was announced by Secretary of Defense Laird  Aug 1973—SECDEF James Schlesinger elevated the Total Force Concept to the Total Force Policy  Objective: Integrate Active and Reserve forces in the most cost- effective manner possible maintain as small an active peacetime force as commitments permit. Policy 4

5  Improved the equipment to state of the art during the 1980s  “First to deploy, first to be equipped.” - DOD Directive 1225.6 Force Modernization 5

6  Provides 50% of total US military force  Only consumes 8.3 % of DOD budget Cost Effectiveness 6

7 Total Air Force Budget Reserve Budget 4% Air Force Combat Capability Supplied by Reserve 20% Cost Effectiveness AFR 7

8 Total Air Force Budget ANG Budget 7% Air Force Combat Capability Supplied by ANG 34% Cost Effectiveness ANG 8

9  Other cost-saving benefits (for the Air Force)  No paid leave  No family healthcare  Smaller retirement fund contributions Cost Efficiency 9

10  Ready Reserve – Combat ready; deploy in 72 hours  Selected Reserve  Individual Ready Reserve  Inactive National Guard  Standby Reserve  Retired Reserve Reserve Categories 10

11 * Selected Reserve part of Ready Reserve  Units and individuals designated as essential to wartime missions  Have priority for training, equipment, and personnel  Individual Mobilization Augmentees (IMAs)  Not attached to an organized Reserve unit  Assigned to active duty components Selected Reserve 11

12  Pool of pre-trained individuals who:  Served in Active units or Selected Reserve  Have military service obligation (MSO) remaining  Eligible for involuntary service Individual Ready Reserve * Individual Ready Reserve is part of Ready Reserve 12

13  Don’t not train  Are not attached to active units Inactive National Guard 13

14  Personnel who are not required to train and are not assigned to units.  Reservists whose civilian jobs are key to national defense  Includes people who may have left active duty due to hardships Standby Reserve 14

15  Personnel who receive retired pay (AD/Reserve) or are placed in retirement status but have not yet reached age 60  All may be recalled to active duty by the appropriate service Secretary Retired Reserve 15

16  To provide ready units to the state and nation in three roles:  Federal Role: To support national security objectives  State Role: To protect life and property, and to preserve peace, order, and public safety  Community Role: To participate in local, state, and national programs that add value to America Air National Guard 16

17  Dual Mission  State Protect Life and Property Peace and Order Civil Defense  Federal Support USAF Missions Train for Wartime Air National Guard 17

18 Air National Guard 18

19  Drill Status (Traditional) Guardsmen  67% of force  Typically enlist for 6 years  Minimum of one unit training assembly (UTA) a month and 15 days annual training  Average 27-120 additional days beyond annual commitment National Guard Personnel 19

20  Full time Guardsmen  33% of total Guard force  Air Technicians Full-time Civil Service employees  Active Guard/Reserve (AGR) personnel Same areas as Technicians, but full benefits  Active Duty Component personnel AF personnel assigned to Guard units (advisors)  Active Duty for Training Traditional Guardsmen temporarily on AD for training National Guard Personnel 20

21 Air Force Reserves 21

22  Provides 50% of total US military force  Only consumes 8.3 % of DOD budget*  Missions have increased to a steady state of 12-13 million workdays in each of last 3 years Total Force 22

23 Active Duty AFRANG Satellite Space Operations 23

24 Active Duty AFR ANG Ex: B-1, B-52, B-2 Bombers 24

25 Fighters Active Duty ANG AFR Ex: F-15, F-16, OA-10, A-10, F-22, F117 25

26 Active Duty ANG AFR Ex: C-5, C-141, C-17 Strategic Airlift 26

27 ANG Active Duty AFR Ex: KC-10, KC-135, HC-130 Tankers 27

28 Active Duty AFRANG Ex: HC-130, HH-60 Rescue 28

29 ANG AFR Active Duty Ex: C-130 Theater Airlift 29

30 ANG Examples: F-15, F-16 Air Defense 30

31 AFR Ex: WC-130 Weather Recon 31

32  Full mobilization  Partial mobilization  Presidential Selected Reserve Call-Up  Volunteers Accessibility 32

33  Gives access to the full Ready Reserve  Requires a declaration of war or national emergency by Congress  Duration of Conflict plus 6 months Full Mobilization 33

34  1,000,000 members of the Ready Reserve  Up to 24 months  President must declare a national emergency Partial Mobilization 34

35  Up to 200,000 personnel  Up to 270 days  President must notify Congress Presidential Selected Reserve Call-Up 35

36  Provide the majority of personnel in times of war and peace Volunteers 36

37 Increasing Tempo *For AFR/ANG 1953-1990 (38 Years) 10/10 1991-2010 (19 Years) 120/80 37

38  Vacation  Sick Leave  Weekends  Holidays A Balanced Lifestyle: Typical Civilian 38 Work = 221 Days Play = 144 Days 144 221

39 Reservists Support Commitments Work = 221 Days Support = 60 Days Play = 84 Days 84 281 39

40 Work = 221 Days Play = 21 Days 21 Aircrew = 123 Days 344 060 Aircrew Commitments 40

41  Reserve Categories  Ready Reserves  Standby  Retired  Chain of Command  ANG vs. AFRC  Accessibility  Full/Partial Mobilization  Presidential Selected Reserve Call-up  Volunteers Points to Remember 41

42 “We need to shift away from the Cold War stance of having the active duty do the operational missions and have the Reserves just do training.” ~ Vice Admiral David Frost, Former Deputy CINC, US SPACE COMMAND 42

43  Prepare for Lesson # 18  Air & Space Functions Homework 43


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