Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

2.6 Plans and design - points to consider Jan-Olof Drangert, Linköping University, Sweden Planning and design - does it make any difference if they are.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "2.6 Plans and design - points to consider Jan-Olof Drangert, Linköping University, Sweden Planning and design - does it make any difference if they are."— Presentation transcript:

1 2.6 Plans and design - points to consider Jan-Olof Drangert, Linköping University, Sweden Planning and design - does it make any difference if they are good or bad? Learning objective : to appreciate the possibilities offered by nature to facilitate easy use and operation of household sanitation arrangements

2 Step 1: Make use of the landscape characteristics flooded water- logged deep ground- water rocky area Groundwater level saturated zone The selection of sanitation arrangements is guided by slopes, soil profiles and other landscape characteristics Jan-Olof Drangert, Linköping University, Sweden

3 Step 2: Take advantage of sloping ground and raised house foundations ( fluids ) Make use of gravity to discharge fluids saturated zone Jan-Olof Drangert, Linköping University, Sweden

4 Step 3 : Use vertical space wisely (solids) areas with deep groundwater levels and/or impermeable soils hard rock area or shallow groundwater flood-prone area floor or ground Pedestal or pan is on a raised watertight vault Vault is on the floor and being part of the pedestal Pedestal or pan is on floor and vault/pit underneath Jan-Olof Drangert, Linköping University, Sweden

5 Step 4: Minimise the number of steps to reach the pedestal or pan No steps are needed to reach these indoor pedestals Jan-Olof Drangert, Linköping University, Sweden

6 Step 5: Minimise the distance to the toilet Lay-out for tenant housesProfiles: Locations of toilet rooms in a tenant housing complex Jan-Olof Drangert, Linköping University, Sweden Indoor toilet Attached toilet Tenant 3 Tenant 1 Owners rooms Tenant 4 Tenant 2

7 Step 6 : Consider housing density and number of people per household Use of human excreta related to available open space 1,000 m 2 % utilized nutrients 100 m 2 10 m % 50 % 0 Jan-Olof Drangert, Linköping University, Sweden FEASIBILITY GAP Legally approved urban agriculture Human urine and faeces must be transported away to agricultural areas open space p.p.

8 Step 7: Assess available capacity among residents, entrepreneurs & local government Jan-Olof Drangert, Linköping University, Sweden Co-composting excreta, straw and dung Entrepreneur emptying faecal bins

9 Step 8: Consider the changing local culture Residents: Enough space is necessary for reuse in situ, but is not sufficient. Reuse also presupposes an interest to do so. Many societies do not practise urban agriculture, but when given the opportunity residents to a large extent accept the idea of gardening. A strong reason is that sanitised urine and treated dry faecal material are used, not fresh excreta. Professionals: Well-maintained urine-diverting toilets are odour- less and can be installed indoors. However, professionals often believe that toilets in poor housing areas have to be in the yard. Repeatedly it has been shown that residents prefer an indoor toilet, once they are aware of the odour-less option. Several benefits of indoor toilets are that they offer better privacy and security, are easy to clean and maintain, and they are convenient for the sick and disabled. From a health point of view the indoor toilet increases the likelihood of hand-washing after defecation. J-O Drangert, Linköping University, Sweden


Download ppt "2.6 Plans and design - points to consider Jan-Olof Drangert, Linköping University, Sweden Planning and design - does it make any difference if they are."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google