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© Boardworks Ltd 2003 1 of 8 Discursive Writing This icon indicates that detailed teacher’s notes are available in the Notes Page. For more detailed instructions,

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Presentation on theme: "© Boardworks Ltd 2003 1 of 8 Discursive Writing This icon indicates that detailed teacher’s notes are available in the Notes Page. For more detailed instructions,"— Presentation transcript:

1 © Boardworks Ltd 2003 1 of 8 Discursive Writing This icon indicates that detailed teacher’s notes are available in the Notes Page. For more detailed instructions, see the Getting Started presentation. This icon indicates the slide contains activities created in Flash. These activities are not editable.

2 © Boardworks Ltd 2003 2 of 8 Discursive writing Discursive writing is where: you discuss a topic you look at all the good points and bad points then you reach your conclusion. Can you think of any examples of discursive writing? What about: magazine and newspaper articles looking at all angles of an issue write-ups of surveys formal essays which compare, contrast or look at advantages and disadvantages?

3 © Boardworks Ltd 2003 3 of 8 Discursive writing Here is an example of a discursive text. Do children watch too much television? A recent study shows that the average 10–14 year old spends more than two hours a day in front of the telly. Furthermore, a disturbing 20% watch between 3 and 4 hours an evening. Whether or not this is damaging is a matter of some debate. Watching substantial amounts of TV has been linked to child obesity, as children prefer to stay indoors than play sport outside. It is also thought that television viewing may encourage antisocial behaviour and many children are watching programmes that are inappropriate for their age group. However, there are advantages of sitting in front of the box. While the majority of children choose to watch cartoons, a significant proportion also claimed to enjoy documentaries and fact- based programmes. Nevertheless, it seems obvious that children should only be encouraged to watch television in moderation, whilst also participating in a range of other evening activities. introduction to topic bad points good points conclusion

4 © Boardworks Ltd 2003 4 of 8 Conventions of discursive writing Discursive writing uses certain conventions, some of which you may have spotted in the example on the last slide. rhetorical question present tense active voice connective evidence point of view (distanced from narrator)? Can you find an example of the following:

5 © Boardworks Ltd 2003 5 of 8 Conventions of discursive writing

6 © Boardworks Ltd 2003 6 of 8 Connectives

7 © Boardworks Ltd 2003 7 of 8 Connectives

8 © Boardworks Ltd 2003 8 of 8 Discursive writing Choose a film, TV programme, book or CD to review. Discuss the good and bad points of the item. Remember to use the connectives you have learnt! Use the present tense, and conclude by giving a point of view. Writing a review!


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