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SUNY GENERAL EDUCATION ASSESSMENT CONFERENCE Guidelines for and Implementation of Strengthened Campus-Based Assessment.

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Presentation on theme: "SUNY GENERAL EDUCATION ASSESSMENT CONFERENCE Guidelines for and Implementation of Strengthened Campus-Based Assessment."— Presentation transcript:

1 SUNY GENERAL EDUCATION ASSESSMENT CONFERENCE Guidelines for and Implementation of Strengthened Campus-Based Assessment

2 Presenters: Patricia Francis, Melanie Vainder, and Tina Good GEAR Co-Chairs

3 Session Objectives: To enable participants to return to their institution with a clear idea of how to begin the process of revising their campus’ existing assessment plan to meet the new GEAR guidelines To begin dialogue among ourselves – focusing on best assessment practices – as we move toward implementing Strengthened Campus-Based Assessment

4 Specific Topics to be Covered: Clarification of “how the process will work” with special emphasis on issues of concern raised by campuses Using nationally-normed measures and correlating a local measure to a nationally- normed measure: Issues to consider and advantages/disadvantages Using scoring rubrics and standards: Issues to consider and advantages/disadvantages

5 How the Process Will Work: The New Guidelines Patricia Francis, Assistant Provost for University Assessment and Academic Initiatives

6 Strengthened Campus-Based Assessment: Major Implications One general education assessment process, overseen by GEAR Utilization of externally referenced measures for Basic Communication [Written], Critical Thinking [Reasoning], and Mathematics, effective Fall 2006 Measure of campus’ academic environment Option of using value-added approach Cost to be covered by System Administration (with sample size limitations consistent with existing GEAR guidelines)

7 GEAR’s #1 Operating Principle: Require as few changes as possible in campus’ existing general education assessment plan (and, therefore, minimal new information)

8 Campus Responses to Draft GEAR Guidelines Concerns and Answers

9 Funding System Administration will bear the cost of all three measurement options, based upon a sample size equal to at least 20% of total students enrolled in a learning outcomes area at the time of the assessment System Administration will also fund the administration of the NSSE, CCSSE, or other measure of academic environment

10 Mathematics Learning Outcomes For Strengthened Campus-Based Assessment, campuses will develop plans that focus on the new math outcomes approved by ACGE and the Provost These outcomes can be found in your registration packet

11 Mapping of Existing Nationally-Normed Measures to SUNY Learning Outcomes GEAR concluded there was inadequate mapping during Fall 2004 In meetings between System Administration staff and testing company representatives, we emphasized the importance of adapting measures to meet SUNY’s needs

12 Course-Embedded Assessment as an Assessment Strategy GEAR has always encouraged campuses to use course-embedded assessment, and will continue to do so (though campuses are certainly free to propose and use alternative approaches)

13 Integrating New Campus Plans Into Existing Campus-Based Plans Campuses already have GEAR-approved plans, and much of what is included in those plans need not be changed In particular, campuses should feel free to adhere to their existing assessment schedule The major change: Effective Fall 2006, campuses must use externally referenced measures as approved by GEAR to assess Writing, Critical Thinking, and Mathematics

14 Options 1 and 2: Using Nationally- Normed Measures and Correlating a Local Measure to a Nationally- Normed Measure Melanie Vainder, Professor of English and Technical Communications, Farmingdale State University

15 GEAR Research: Existing Nationally- Normed Measures ACT CAAP ACADEMIC PROFILE CALIFORNIA CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS TEST QUANT Q CRITICAL REASONING APPRAISAL GRE ACCUPLACER (Including WritePlacer)

16 Using Nationally-Normed Measures: Advantages Less labor intensive with respect to test development and scoring (particularly in the area of writing), and reliability of scoring assured Provides opportunity for campuses to compare results with those obtained at peer institutions Reporting capacity provided by companies, allowing campuses to examine overall program effectiveness, success of individual courses, and relationship between student variables and performance

17 Using Nationally-Normed Measures: Advantages (cont.) Relative ease of using pre- and post-test approach in order to determine “value added” if desired Ability for campuses to choose from among available modules in the areas of Writing, Mathematics, and Critical Thinking (i.e., it is not an “all or nothing” approach) Possibility of using measures in a course-embedded fashion, completed within a single class session

18 Using Nationally-Normed Measures: Disadvantages Problems with student motivation in stand- alone testing Existing measures do not map adequately to the SUNY Learning Outcomes for Writing, Mathematics, and Critical Thinking Existing measures do not yield separate sub- scores for each of the Learning Outcomes for Writing, Mathematics, and Critical Thinking

19 Correlating a Local Measure to a Nationally- Normed Measure: Issues to Consider Does the local measure directly assess student learning and does it measure the learning outcome(s) it is intended to measure? Is it characterized by adequate inter-observer reliability? Has it been demonstrated to correlate statistically with a nationally-normed measure of the same learning outcome(s)?

20 Correlating a Local Measure to a Nationally- Normed Measure: Advantages Closer alignment between locally-developed measures and curriculum Local measure can be specifically developed to meet all SUNY Learning Outcomes Possibility that campuses may continue to use previously-used measures (and therefore be able to make direct comparisons between student performance on the same measure)

21 Correlating a Local Measure to a Nationally- Normed Measure: Disadvantages Duplicate testing will be needed at outset to demonstrate correlations between local and nationally-normed measures Very time- and labor-intensive Student motivation factor Extensive psychometric expertise required with this approach

22 Using Scoring Rubrics and Standards Tina Good, Assistant Professor of English, Suffolk County Community College

23 Option 3: Using Scoring Rubrics and Standards Discipline-Specific Panels are working to create rubrics and standards for:  Written Communication  Mathematics  Critical Thinking Process of rubric design will be transparent  Drafts of rubrics will be posted online  Minutes and membership are posted online

24 Using Scoring Rubrics and Standards: Options Use the actual rubrics and standards created by Discipline-Specific Panels Show how your campus rubrics correlate to the rubrics designed by the panels Mix and match

25 Using Scoring Rubrics and Standards: Advantages Provides an opportunity to re-submit already developed rubrics and demonstrate correlations with those designed by panels Provides for faculty involvement in the creation of rubrics and standards for their own programs Allows for revision of rubrics as innovations, philosophies and pedagogies evolve in the discipline

26 Using Scoring Rubrics and Standards: Advantages Provides for faculty involvement in the assessment process (i.e., through application of the rubrics) Rubrics can be specifically developed to meet all SUNY Learning Outcomes Provides for collaboration on multiple levels throughout the assessment process

27 Using Scoring Rubrics and Standards: Disadvantages Assessment process more cumbersome to implement than a nationally-normed measure The level of faculty involvement required could also be a disadvantage, especially for those programs that have few faculty available to serve on assessment committees Establishing validity and reliability of process can be time consuming

28 Implementing Strengthened Campus- Based Assessment: Resources The GEAR Group and Web site (www.cortland.edu/gear)www.cortland.edu/gear SUNY System’s Office of Academic Affairs Sister campuses – many “best practices” are already out there! Discipline-Specific Panels Other ideas?

29 SUNY GENERAL EDUCATION ASSESSMENT CONFERENCE Guidelines for and Implementation of Strengthened Campus-Based Assessment


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