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Chapter Menu Chapter Introduction Lesson 1Lesson 1Earth’s Resources Lesson 2Lesson 2Pollution Lesson 3Lesson 3Protecting Earth Chapter Wrap-Up.

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Presentation on theme: "Chapter Menu Chapter Introduction Lesson 1Lesson 1Earth’s Resources Lesson 2Lesson 2Pollution Lesson 3Lesson 3Protecting Earth Chapter Wrap-Up."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Chapter Menu Chapter Introduction Lesson 1Lesson 1Earth’s Resources Lesson 2Lesson 2Pollution Lesson 3Lesson 3Protecting Earth Chapter Wrap-Up

3 Chapter Introduction How can people protect Earth’s resources?

4 Chapter Introduction What do you think? Before you begin, decide if you agree or disagree with each of these statements. As you view this presentation, see if you change your mind about any of the statements.

5 Chapter Introduction 1.The world’s supply of coal will never run out. 2.You should include minerals in your diet. 3.Global warming causes acid rain. 4.Smog can affect human health. Do you agree or disagree?

6 Chapter Introduction 5.Oil left over from frying potatoes can be used as automobile fuel. 6.Hybrid electric vehicles cannot travel far or go fast. Do you agree or disagree?

7 Lesson 1 Reading Guide - KC What are natural resources? How do the three types of natural resources differ? Earth’s Resources

8 Lesson 1 Reading Guide - Vocab natural resource nonrenewable resource renewable resource inexhaustible resource geothermal energy Earth’s Resources

9 Lesson 1-1 Parts of the environment that supply materials useful or necessary for the survival of living things are called natural resources. natural resources Natural resources include land, air, minerals, and fuels. Natural Resources

10 Lesson 1-1 Natural Resources (cont.) What are natural resources?

11 Lesson 1-2 Nonrenewable resources are natural resources that are being used up faster than they can be replaced by natural processes.Nonrenewable resources Nonrenewable resources include fossil fuels and minerals. Nonrenewable Resources

12 Lesson 1-2 Fossil fuels, which formed from the decayed remains of organisms that died millions of years ago, include coal, oil, and natural gas. Although fossil fuels are forming all the time, we use them much more quickly than nature replaces them. Fossil fuels are used primarily as sources of energy. Nonrenewable Resources (cont.)

13 Lesson 1-2 Minerals are nonliving substances that form over millions of years through geologic processes. Because they take so long to form, most minerals are considered nonrenewable. Nonrenewable Resources (cont.)

14 Lesson 1-2 Iron is a mineral that can be used to make steel for cars and buildings. Iron is an important mineral to include in your diet to keep your blood healthy. People with that do not get enough iron can be anemic. Nonrenewable Resources (cont.)

15 Lesson 1-3 Supplies of many natural resources, such as water, are constantly renewed by natural cycles. Renewable resources are natural resources that can be replenished by natural processes at least as quickly as they are used.Renewable resources Renewable Resources

16 Lesson 1-3 Renewable resources include water, air, land, and living things. If people use any resource faster than it is replaced, it becomes nonrenewable. Renewable Resources (cont.)

17 Lesson 1-3 Without plants, Earth’s atmosphere would not contain enough oxygen to support most forms of life. Land resources include topsoil, wildlife, and ecosystems—such as forests, grasslands, deserts, and coral reefs. All organisms require water to live. People need a reliable supply of freshwater for drinking, washing, and irrigating crops. Renewable Resources (cont.)

18 Lesson 1-4 An inexhaustible resource is a natural resource that will not run out, no matter how much of it people use.inexhaustible resource Solar energy, wind, and thermal energy from within the Earth are all examples of inexhaustible resources. Inexhaustible Resources

19 Lesson 1-4 Inexhaustible Resources (cont.) How do inexhaustible resources differ from renewable and nonrenewable resources?

20 Lesson 1-4 Solar energy can be harnessed for many uses: Greenhouses trap heat and make it possible to grow warm-weather plants in cool climates. Solar cookers concentrate the Sun’s heat to cook food. Large solar-power plants provide electricity to many homes. Inexhaustible Resources (cont.)

21 Lesson 1-4 Solar energy can be used to heat water for individual homes.

22 Lesson 1-4 Wind is an inexhaustible resource produced by the uneven heating of the atmosphere by the Sun.

23 Lesson 1-5 Geothermal energy is thermal energy from within the Earth.Geothermal energy Underground water heated by molten rock produces steam used to generate electricity. Inexhaustible Resources (cont.)

24 Lesson 1-5 Inexhaustible Resources (cont.) geothermal from Greek geo–, means “earth”; and Greek therme, means “heat”

25 Lesson 1 - VS Living things depend on natural resources such as water, air, and land to meet their needs. Water is considered a renewable resource. Wind energy can be transformed into electricity.

26 Lesson 1 – LR1 What type of resources can be replenished by natural processes at least as quickly as they are used? A.renewable B.nonrenewable C.inexhaustible D.geothermal

27 Lesson 1 – LR2 A.fossil fuels B.minerals C.solar energy D.turbines What are nonliving substances found in Earth’s crust?

28 Lesson 1 – LR3 A.renewable B.nonrenewable C.inexhaustible D.fossil fuel Wind is an example of what type of resource?

29 Lesson 1 - Now 1.The world’s supply of coal will never run out. 2.You should include minerals in your diet. Do you agree or disagree?

30 Lesson 2 Reading Guide - KC How does pollution affect air resources? How does pollution affect water resources? How does pollution affect land resources? Pollution

31 Lesson 2 Reading Guide - Vocab pollution ozone layer photochemical smog global warming acid precipitation Pollution

32 Lesson 2-1 Pollution is the contamination of the environment with substances that are harmful to life.Pollution Most pollution occurs because of human actions, such as burning fossil fuels or spilling toxic materials. Pollution also can come from natural disasters like wildfires or volcanic eruptions. What is pollution?

33 Lesson 2-1 Air pollution that can affect human health and recreational activities can be caused by ozone loss, photochemical smog, global warming, and acid precipitation. The ozone layer prevents most harmful ultraviolet (UV) radiation from reaching Earth.ozone layer UV radiation from the Sun can cause cancer and cataracts and can damage crops. Air Pollution

34 Lesson 2-1 Sunlight reacts with waste gases from the burning of fossil fuels to form a type of air pollution called photochemical smog.photochemical smog Smog can harm plants and animals and cause lung damage. Air Pollution (cont.)

35 Lesson 2-1 photochemical smog from Greek photo–, means “light”; Latin chemic, means “alchemy”; and modern English smog, blend of “smoke” and “fog” Air Pollution (cont.)

36 Lesson 2-1 Photochemical smog can worsen throughout the day as chemicals continue to react with sunlight.

37 Lesson 2-1 Global warming is the scientific observation that Earth’s average temperature is increasing.Global warming Global warming can lead to climate change—changing weather conditions, changes to ecosystems and food webs, increases in the number and severity of floods and droughts, and increased coastal flooding as sea ice melts and sea level rises. Air Pollution (cont.)

38 Lesson 2-1 Acid precipitation is acidic rain or snow that forms when waste gases from automobiles and power plants combine with moisture in the air.Acid precipitation Acid precipitation contributes to water pollution, pollutes soil, and can kill plants, including trees. Air Pollution (cont.)

39 Lesson 2-1 How does pollution affect air resources? Air Pollution (cont.)

40 Lesson 2-3 Water pollution can come from chemical runoff and other agricultural, residential, and industrial sources. Wastewater that drains from showers, sinks, and toilets, and wastewater that comes from industries and mining operations requires treatment to help purify it before it is used again or returned to the environment. Water Pollution

41 Lesson 2-3 Water that flows over the land when it rains is called runoff. Runoff flows across lawns and farmland where it picks up pesticides, herbicides, and fertilizers. Runoff carries these pollutants into streams, where they can harm insects, fish, and other organisms. Water Pollution (cont.)

42 Lesson 2-3 Water Pollution (cont.) How does pollution affect water resources?

43 Lesson 2-4 Litter can pollute soil and water and disturb wildlife. Pesticides and other agricultural chemicals become pollutants if they are used in excess or disposed of improperly. Land Pollution

44 Lesson 2-4 Many industrial facilities produce toxic wastes that, if incorrectly stored or disposed of, contaminate soil and water. Mining of fossil fuels and minerals can disturb or destroy entire ecosystems. Land Pollution (cont.)

45 Lesson 2-4 How does pollution affect land resources? Land Pollution (cont.)

46 Lesson 2 - VS Pollution, the introduction of harmful substances into the environment, can harm humans and other living things. Smog, ozone loss, global warming, and acid precipitation are caused by air pollutants. Land and water can be polluted by littering and chemical runoff from homes, factories, mines, and farms.

47 Lesson 2 – LR1 What is the scientific observation that Earth’s average temperature is increasing? A.acid precipitation B.global warming C.photochemical smog D.water pollution

48 Lesson 2 – LR2 A.acid precipitation B.photochemical smog C.runoff D.sediment Which term refers to water that flows over the land when it rains?

49 Lesson 2 – LR3 A.runoff B.photochemical smog C.ozone layer D.acid precipitation What is the result of sunlight reacting with waste gases from the burning of fossil fuels?

50 Lesson 2 - Now 3.Global warming causes acid rain. 4.Smog can affect human health. Do you agree or disagree?

51 Lesson 3 Reading Guide - KC How can people monitor resource use? How can people conserve resources? Protecting Earth

52 Lesson 3 Reading Guide - Vocab sustainability recycling Protecting Earth

53 Lesson 3-1 Scientists collect data on a variety of environmental conditions by placing detectors on satellites, aircraft, high- altitude balloons, and ground-based monitoring stations. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is a government organization that monitors the health of the environment and looks for ways to reduce human impacts. Monitoring Human Impact on Earth

54 Lesson 3-1 Monitoring Human Impact on Earth (cont.) How can people monitor resource use?

55 Lesson 3-2 Many technologies developed to protect Earth’s resources focus on saving energy and reducing pollution. Because it takes energy to clean water and transport it to homes, technologies that conserve water also save energy. Relying on renewable energy sources can reduce fossil fuel use, creating less pollution. Developing Technologies

56 Lesson 3-2 CFCs, which cause thinning of the ozone layer, soon will be phased out and replaced with chemicals that do not contain chlorine.

57 Lesson 3-2 Gasohol and biodiesel are alternative fuels that help reduce humans’ use of fossil fuels and reduce air pollution. The higher a car’s miles per gallon (mpg), the less pollution it will add to the environment and the fewer fossil-fuel resources it will use. Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) can get up to twice the mileage of a conventional car. Developing Technologies (cont.)

58 Lesson 3-2 A hybrid vehicle uses a battery to power an electric motor. A small gasoline engine provides additional power.

59 Lesson 3-2 Developing Technologies (cont.) hybrid Science Use an offspring of two animals or plants of different breeds or species Common Use something that has two different components performing essentially the same task

60 Lesson 3-3 Sustainability means meeting human needs in ways that ensure future generations also will be able to meet their needs.Sustainability Restoring damaged habitats and ecosystems to their original state is one way to make a difference. Making a Difference

61 Lesson 3-3 You can reduce the amount of waste you create by reducing the amount of material you use. Recycling is manufacturing new products out of used products—a process which reduces wastes and extends our supply of natural resources.Recycling Making a Difference (cont.)

62 Lesson 3-3 Making a Difference (cont.) recycle from Latin re–, means “again”; and Greek kyklos, means “circle”

63 Lesson 3-3 Making a Difference (cont.) How can you conserve resources?

64 Lesson 3 - VS Scientists use a variety of techniques to monitor the use of natural resources, including satellites, aircraft, high-altitude balloons, and ground-based monitoring stations.

65 Lesson 3 - VS New technologies such as HEVs and alternative fuels conserve resources and produce less pollution. People can help protect resources by reducing their use of resources, reusing products, and recycling products.

66 Lesson 3 – LR1 Technologies that save water also saves which of these? A.CFCs B.energy C.gasoline D.HEVs

67 Lesson 3 – LR2 A.conservation B.recycling C.renewable energy resources D.sustainability Which term refers to meeting human needs in ways that ensure future generations?

68 Lesson 3 – LR3 A.biodiesel B.CFCs C.gasohol D.ozone Which is a mixture of 90 percent gasoline and 10 percent ethanol?

69 Lesson 3 - Now 5.Oil left over from frying potatoes can be used as automobile fuel. 6.Hybrid electric vehicles cannot travel far or go fast. Do you agree or disagree?

70 Chapter Review Menu Key Concept Summary Interactive Concept Map Chapter Review Standardized Test Practice

71 The BIG Idea People can protect Earth’s resources by understanding how their use of natural resources affects the environment, knowing which natural resources are in limited supply, and making decisions toward a more sustainable future.

72 Key Concepts 1 Natural resources are raw materials and forms of energy that are important to living things. Resources can be renewable or nonrenewable. Some renewable resources are inexhaustible. Lesson 1: Earth’s Resources

73 Key Concepts 2 Lesson 2: Pollution Air pollutants cause photochemical smog, ozone loss, global warming, and acid precipitation. Chemical runoff can damage lakes, streams, and water supplies. Sediment runoff from land can disturb aquatic habitats. Litter and pollutants can contaminate soil, harm organisms, and reduce land’s ability to support life. Mining can disturb ecosystems and create toxic wastes.

74 Key Concepts 3 Satellites, aircraft, and ground-based monitoring stations collect data on pollution. The EPA monitors pollution and helps develop clean-up plans. People can protect Earth’s resources by reducing, reusing, and recycling. Lesson 3: Protecting Earth

75 Chapter Review – MC1 A.inexhaustible B.nonrenewable C.renewable D.unlimited What type of resources are being used up faster than they can be replaced by natural processes?

76 Chapter Review – MC2 A.fossil fuels B.solar power C.uranium D.wind Which resource is used most often for an energy source?

77 Chapter Review – MC3 A.acid precipitation B.global warming C.ozone layer D.photochemical smog What prevents most harmful ultraviolet radiation from reaching Earth?

78 Chapter Review – MC4 A.recycling B.restoring C.reusing D.sustainability What term refers manufacturing new products out of used products?

79 Chapter Review – MC5 A.CFCs B.gasohol C.HEVs D.photochemical smog Which of these causes thinning of the ozone?

80 Chapter Review – STP1 A.nonrenewable resources B.natural resources C.minerals D.inexhaustible resources What are parts of the environment that supply materials useful or necessary for the survival of living things?

81 Chapter Review – STP2 A.renewable resource B.nonrenewable resource C.inexhaustible resource D.fossil fuel Which term refers to a natural resource that will not run out, no matter how much of it people use?

82 Chapter Review – STP3 A.acid precipitation B.global warming C.ozone layer D.photochemical smog What can lead to changing weather conditions, changes to ecosystems and food webs, and increases in the severity of floods and droughts?

83 Chapter Review – STP4 A.air pollution B.global warming C.photochemical smog D.runoff What flows across lawns and farmland where it can pick up pollutants such as pesticides, herbicides, and fertilizers?

84 Chapter Review – STP5 A.biodiesel B.gasohol C.gasoline D.hybrid technology Which does NOT reduce the amount of pollution created by vehicles?


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