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DATA-BASED DECISION MAKING USING STUDENT DATA-BECAUSE IT’S BEST PRACTICE & IT’S REQUIRED Dr. David D. Hampton Bowling Green State University.

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Presentation on theme: "DATA-BASED DECISION MAKING USING STUDENT DATA-BECAUSE IT’S BEST PRACTICE & IT’S REQUIRED Dr. David D. Hampton Bowling Green State University."— Presentation transcript:

1 DATA-BASED DECISION MAKING USING STUDENT DATA-BECAUSE IT’S BEST PRACTICE & IT’S REQUIRED Dr. David D. Hampton Bowling Green State University

2 Today Discuss the pressing need for compiling and USING student progress data to drive instruction Overview on types of assessment Provide an example of a research validated system of screening and progress monitoring Questions & Discussion

3 Why Collect Data… “If we don't change direction soon, we'll end up where we're going.” Professor Irwin Corey

4 Why should we compile student outcome data? It’s BEST PRACTICE! Research is clear that understanding students’ response to instructional delivery, increases achievement. those teachers who use student progress data to inform instruction have students who achieve higher scores on State-wide assessments It is now required as part of OTES

5 Just a VERY brief word on Ohio Teacher Evaluation System 50% of each teacher’s annual evaluation will be based upon the student progress in subject proficiency during an academic year. The Benchmark for assessing this progress is called Student Learning Outcomes

6 What is a Student Learning Objective? A Student Learning Objective (SLO) is a measurable, long-term academic growth target that a teacher sets at the beginning of the year for all students or for subgroups of students. SLOs demonstrate a teacher’s impact on student learning within a given interval of instruction based upon baseline data gathered at the beginning of the course.

7 High ‐ quality SLOs include the following: Baseline and Trend Data. Student Population. Interval of Instruction. Standards and Content. Assessment(s). Rationale for Growth Target(s).

8 5 Generic Data Reflection Questions What do the data seem to tell us? What don’t the data tell us? What else might we want to know? What good news is here for us to celebrate? What opportunities for improvement are suggested by these data?

9 What Is the Difference Between Traditional Assessments and Progress Monitoring? Traditional Assessments: Lengthy tests Not administered on a regular basis Teachers do not receive immediate feedback Student scores are based on national scores and averages and a teacher’s classroom may differ tremendously from the national student sample

10 What Is the Difference Between Traditional Assessments and Progress Monitoring? Curriculum-Based Measurement (CBM) is one type of PM CBM provides an easy and quick method for demonstrating student progress Teachers can analyze student scores and adjust student goals and instructional programs Student data can be compared to teacher’s classroom or school district data

11 Curriculum-Based Measurement A simple set of procedures for repeated measurement of student growth toward long-range instructional goals (Deno, 1985) Simple Repeated measurement Growth over time

12 Curriculum-Based Measurement The result of 40 years of research Used across the country Demonstrates strong reliability, validity, and instructional utility

13 Curriculum-Based Measurement Not interested in making kids read faster Interested in kids becoming better readers The CBM score is an OVERALL INDICATOR of reading competence Students who score high on CBMs are better: Decoders At sight vocabulary Comprehenders Correlates highly with high-stakes tests

14 CBM: An Index of Academic Health Markell, M.

15 Weight Loss Graph Espin, C.

16 Interventions Espin, C.

17 How does weight loss relate to monitoring academic skills? We want a graph of “educational health” What do we measure? Espin, C.

18 Measuring Educational Health We want to measure “educational health” using something that is: Inexpensive Easy Time efficient Sensitive to change Easy to understand An INDICATOR of educational health The measures do tell us if our teaching is effective. The measures do not tell us what to teach. Espin, C.

19 The Basics of CBM in Reading CBM monitors student progress throughout the school year Students are given reading probes at regular intervals Weekly, bi-weekly, monthly, FWS Teachers use student data to quantify short- and long-term goals that will meet end-of-year goals

20 Now that I got the Data How Do I Organize it?

21 Simple Spreadsheet

22 Simple Spreadsheet “tweaked”

23

24 GOAL-SETTING

25 Goal Setting: Methods Universal benchmarks, aggregate norms from a web- based system Use of growth rates that reflect typical increases in performance by grade level

26 Oral Reading Fluency Norms, 2005 12345678 5989107125138150 Grad e WPM *Spring norms *Over 100,000 students Taken from: Oral Reading Fluency, 90 Years of Measurement. Behavioral Research and Teaching, Eugene, OR, 2005. http://brt.uoregon.edu/techreports/TR_33_NCORF_DescStats.pdf

27 Realistic and Ambitious Growth Rates for Oral Reading Fluency Grade Realistic Ambitious 12.03.0 21.52.0 31.01.5 40.851.1 50.50.8 60.30.65 Maze Fluency0.40.85 (see L. S. Fuchs, Fuchs, Hamlett, Walz, & Germann, 1993)

28 Data Utilization Now that I have all the data, what do I do?

29 Data Utilization—Most important aspect of CBM!  Is the student progressing?  Do I need to change instruction?  Is the instruction effective?  Is the instructional change effective?  Should I raise the student’s goal?

30 Intervention Implementation Most important aspect of CBM USE THE DATA!!! The following instructional elements may be altered to enhance student performance: Instructional strategies Size of instructional group Time allocated for instruction Materials used Reinforcement

31 Thank you for your time Questions & Comments Please feel to contact me with any questions David Hampton- BGSU hamptod@bgsu.edu


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