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Commutativity Analysis: A New Analysis Framework for Parallelizing Compilers Martin C. Rinard Pedro C. Diniz University of California, Santa Barbara Santa.

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Presentation on theme: "Commutativity Analysis: A New Analysis Framework for Parallelizing Compilers Martin C. Rinard Pedro C. Diniz University of California, Santa Barbara Santa."— Presentation transcript:

1 Commutativity Analysis: A New Analysis Framework for Parallelizing Compilers Martin C. Rinard Pedro C. Diniz University of California, Santa Barbara Santa Barbara, California

2 Goal Develop a Parallelizing Compiler for Object-Oriented Computations Current Focus Irregular Computations Dynamic Data Structures Future Persistent Data Distributed Computations New Analysis Technique: Commutativity Analysis

3 Structure of Talk Model of Computation Example Commutativity Testing Steps To Practicality Experimental Results Conclusion

4 Model of Computation operations objects initial object state executing operation new object state invoked operations operation

5 Graph Traversal Example class graph { int val, sum; graph *left, *right; }; void graph::traverse(int v) { sum += v; if (left !=NULL) left->traverse(val); if (right!=NULL) right->traverse(val); } Goal Execute left and right traverse operations in parallel

6 Parallel Traversal

7 Commuting Operations in Parallel Traversal

8 Model of Computation Operations: Method Invocations In Example: Invocations of graph::traverse left->traverse(3) right->traverse(2) Objects: Instances of Classes In Example: Graph Nodes Instance Variables Implement Object State In Example: val, sum, left, right

9 Model of Computation Operations: Method Invocations In Example: Invocations of graph::traverse left->traverse(3) right->traverse(2) Objects: Instances of Classes In Example: Graph Nodes

10 Separable Operations Each Operation Consists of Two Sections Object Section Only Accesses Receiver Object Invocation Section Only Invokes Operations Both Sections Can Access Parameters

11 Basic Approach Compiler Chooses A Computation to Parallelize In Example: Entire graph::traverse Computation Compiler Computes Extent of the Computation Representation of all Operations in Computation Current Representation: Set of Methods In Example: { graph::traverse } Do All Pairs of Operations in Extent Commute? No - Generate Serial Code Yes - Generate Parallel Code In Example: All Pairs Commute

12 Code Generation For Each Method in Parallel Computation Augments Class Declaration With Mutual Exclusion Lock Generates Driver Version of Method Invoked from Serial Code to Start Parallel Execution Invokes Parallel Version of Operation Waits for Entire Parallel Computation to Finish Generates Parallel Version of Method Object Section Lock Acquired at Beginning Lock Released at End Ensure Atomic Execution Invocation Section Invoked Operations Execute in Parallel Invokes Parallel Version

13 Class Declaration class graph { lock mutex; int val, sum; graph *left, *right; }; Driver Version void graph::traverse(int v){ parallel_traverse(v); wait(); } Code Generation In Example

14 Parallel Version In Example void graph::parallel_traverse(int v) { mutex.acquire(); sum += v; mutex.release(); if (left != NULL) spawn(left->parallel_traverse(val)); if (right != NULL) spawn(right->parallel_traverse(val)); }

15 Compiler Structure Computation Selection Extent Computation Commutativity Testing Generate Parallel Code Generate Serial Code All Operations Commute Operations May Not Commute Entire Computation of Each Method Traverse Call Graph to Extract Extent All Pairs of Operations In Extent

16 Traditional Approach Data Dependence Analysis Analyzes Reads and Writes Independent Pieces of Code Execute in Parallel Demonstrated Success for Array-Based Programs

17 Data Dependence Analysis in Example For Data Dependence Analysis To Succeed in Example left and right traverse Must Be Independent left and right Subgraphs Must Be Disjoint Graph Must Be a Tree Depends on Global Topology of Data Structure Analyze Code that Builds Data Structure Extract and Propagate Topology Information Fails For Graphs

18 Properties of Commutativity Analysis Oblivious to Data Structure Topology Local Analysis Simple Analysis Wide Range of Computations Lists, Trees and Graphs Updates to Central Data Structure General Reductions Introduces Synchronization Relies on Commuting Operations

19 Commutativity Testing

20 Commutativity Testing Conditions Do Two Operations A and B Commute? Compiler Considers Two Execution Orders A;B - A executes before B B;A - B executes before A Compiler Must Check Two Conditions Instance Variables New values of instance variables are same in both execution orders Invoked Operations A and B together directly invoke same set of operations in both execution orders

21 Commutativity Testing Conditions

22 Commutativity Testing Algorithm Symbolic Execution: Compiler Executes Operations Computes with Expressions not Values Compiler Symbolically Executes Operations In Both Execution Orders Expressions for New Values of Instance Variables Expressions for Multiset of Invoked Operations

23 Expression Simplification and Comparison Compiler Applies Rewrite Rules to Simplify Expressions a*(b+c)  a*b)+(a*c) b+(a+c)  (a+b+c) a+if(b

24 Commutativity Testing Example Two Operations r->traverse(v1) and r->traverse(v2) In Order r->traverse(v1) ; r->traverse(v2) Instance Variables New sum= (sum+v1)+v2 Invoked Operations if(right!=NULL,right->traverse(val)), if(left!=NULL,left->traverse(val)), if(right!=NULL,right->traverse(val)), if(left!=NULL,left->traverse(val)) In Order r->traverse(v2) ; r->traverse(v1) Instance Variables New sum= (sum+v2)+v1 Invoked Operations if(right!=NULL,right->traverse(val)), if(left!=NULL,left->traverse(val)), if(right!=NULL,right->traverse(val)), if(left!=NULL,left->traverse(val))

25 Important Special Case Independent Operations Commute Analysis in Current Compiler Dependence Analysis Operations on Objects of Different Classes Independent Operations on Objects of Same Class Symbolic Commutativity Testing Dependent Operations on Objects of Same Class Future Integrate Pointer or Alias Analysis Integrate Array Data Dependence Analysis

26 Important Special Case Independent Operations Commute Conditions for Independence Operations Have Different Receivers Neither Operation Writes an Instance Variable that Other Operation Accesses Detecting Independent Operations In Type-Safe Languages Class Declarations Instance Variable Accesses Pointer or Alias Analysis

27 Analysis in Current Compiler Dependence Analysis Operations on Objects of Different Classes Independent Operations on Objects of Same Class Symbolic Commutativity Testing Dependent Operations on Objects of Same Class Future Integrate Pointer or Alias Analysis Integrate Array Data Dependence Analysis

28 Steps to Practicality

29 Programming Model Extensions Extensions for Read-Only Data Allow Operations to Freely Access Read-Only Data Enhances Ability of Compiler to Represent Expressions Increases Set of Programs that Compiler can Analyze Analysis Granularity Extensions Integrate Operations into Callers for Analysis Purposes Coarsens Commutativity Testing Granularity Reduces Number of Pairs Tested for Commutativity Enhances Effectiveness of Commutativity Testing

30 Optimizations Synchronization Optimizations Eliminate Synchronization Constructs in Methods that Only Access Read-Only Data Reduce Number of Acquire and Release Constructs Parallel Loop Optimization Suppress Exploitation of Excess Concurrency

31 Extent Constants Motivation: Allow Parallel Operations to Freely Access Read-Only Data Extent Constant VariableGlobal variable or instance variable written by no operation in extent Extent Constant ExpressionExpression whose value depends only on extent constant variables or parameters Extent Constant ValueValue computed by extent constant expression Extent ConstantAutomatically generated opaque constant used to represent an extent constant value Requires: Interprocedural Data Usage Analysis Result Summarizes How Operations Access Instance Variables Interprocedural Pointer Analysis for Reference Parameters

32 Extent Constant Variables In Example void graph::traverse(int v) { sum += v; if (left != NULL) left->traverse(val); if (right != NULL) right->traverse(val); } Extent Constant Variable

33 Advantages of Extent Constants Extent Constants Extend Programming Model Enable Direct Global Variable Access Enable Direct Access of Objects other than Receiver Extent Constants Make Compiler More Effective Enable Compact Representations of Large Expressions Enable Compiler to Represent Values Computed by Otherwise Unanalyzable Constructs

34 Auxiliary Operations Motivation: Coarsen Granularity of Commutativity Testing An Operation is an Auxiliary Operation if its Entire Computation Only Computes Extent Constant Values Only Externally Visible Writes are to Local Variables of Caller Auxiliary Operations are Conceptually Part of Caller Analysis Integrates Auxiliary Operations into Caller Represents Computed Values using Extent Constants Requires: Interprocedural Data Usage Analysis Interprocedural Pointer Analysis for Reference Parameters Intraprocedural Reaching Definition Analysis

35 Auxiliary Operation Example int graph::square_and_add(int v) { return(val*val + v); } void graph::traverse(int v) { sum += square_and_add(v); if (left != NULL) left->traverse(val); if (right != NULL) right->traverse(val); } Extent Constant Expression Extent Constant Variable Parameter

36 Advantages of Auxiliary Operations Coarsen Granularity of Commutativity Testing Reduces Number of Pairs Tested for Commutativity Enhances Effectiveness of Commutativity Testing Algorithm Support Modular Programming

37 Synchronization Optimizations Goal: Eliminate or Reduce Synchronization Overhead Synchronization Elimination Data Use One Lock for Multiple Objects Computation Generate One Lock Acquire and Release for Multiple Operations on the Same Object An Operation Only Computes Extent Constant Values Compiler Does Not Generate Lock Acquire and Release ThenIf Lock Coarsening

38 Data Lock Coarsening Example class vector { lock mutex; double val[NDIM]; } void vector::add(double *v){ mutex.acquire(); for(int i=0; i < NDIM; i++) val[i] += v[i]; mutex.release(); } class body { lock mutex; double phi; vector acc; }; void body::gravsub(body *b){ double p, v[NDIM]; mutex.acquire(); p = computeInter(b,v); phi -= p; mutex.release(); acc.add(v); } class vector { double val[NDIM]; } void vector::add(double *v){ for(int i=0; i < NDIM; i++) val[i] += v[i]; } class body { lock mutex; double phi; vector acc; }; void body::gravsub(body *b){ double p, v[NDIM]; mutex.acquire(); p = computeInter(b,v); phi -= p; acc.add(v); mutex.release(); } Original CodeOptimized Code

39 Computation Lock Coarsening Example class body { lock mutex; double phi; vector acc; }; void body::gravsub(body *b){ double p, v[NDIM]; mutex.acquire(); p = computeInter(b,v); phi -= p; acc.add(v); mutex.release(); } void body::loopsub(body *b){ int i; for (i = 0; i < N; i++) { this->gravsub(b+i); } class body { lock mutex; double phi; vector acc; }; void body::gravsub(body *b){ double p, v[NDIM]; p = computeInter(b,v); phi -= p; acc.add(v); } void body::loopsub(body *b){ int i; mutex.acquire(); for (i = 0; i < N; i++) { this->gravsub(b+i); } mutex.release(); } Original CodeOptimized Code

40 Parallel Loops Goal: Generate Efficient Code for Parallel Loops If A Loop is in the Following Form for (i = exp1; i < exp2; i += exp3) { exp4->op(exp5,exp6,...); } Where exp1, exp2,... Extent Constant Expressions Then Compiler Generates Parallel Loop Code

41 Parallel Loop Optimization Without Parallel Loop Optimization Each Loop Iteration Generates a Task Tasks are Created and Scheduled Sequentially Each Iteration Incurs Task Creation and Scheduling Overhead With Parallel Loop Optimization Generated Code Immediately Exposes All Iterations Scheduler Operates on Chunks of Loop Iterations Each Chunk of Iterations Incurs Scheduling Overhead Advantages Enables Compact Representation for Loop Computation Reduces Task Creation and Scheduling Overhead Parallelizes Overhead

42 Suppressing Excess Concurrency Goal: Reduce Overhead of Exploiting Parallelism Goal Achieved by Generating Computations that Execute Operations Serially with No Parallelization Overhead Use Synchronization Required to Execute Safely in Parallel Context Mechanism: Mutex Versions of Methods Object Section Acquires Lock at Beginning Releases Lock at End Invocation Section Operations Execute Serially Invokes Mutex Version Current Policy: Each Parallel Loop Iteration Invokes Mutex Version of Operation Suppresses Parallel Execution Within Iterations of Parallel Loops

43 Experimental Results

44 Methodology Built Prototype Compiler Built Run Time System Concurrency Generation and Task Management Dynamic Load Balancing Synchronization Acquired Two Complete Applications Barnes-Hut N-Body Solver Water Code Automatically Parallelized Applications Ran Applications on Stanford DASH Machine Compare Performance with Highly Tuned, Explicitly Parallel Versions from SPLASH-2 Benchmark Suite

45 Prototype Compiler Clean Subset of C++ Sage++ is Front End Structured As a Source-To-Source Translator Analysis Finds Parallel Loops and Methods Compiler Generates Annotation File Identifies Parallel Loops and Methods Classes to Augment with Locks Code Generator Reads Annotation File Generates Parallel Versions of Methods Inserts Synchronization and Parallelization Code Parallelizes Unannotated Programs

46 Major Restrictions Motivation: Simplify Implementation of Prototype No Virtual Methods No Operator or Method Overloading No Multiple Inheritance or Templates No typedef, struct, union or enum types Global Variables must be Class Types No Static Members or Pointers to Members No Default Arguments or Variable Numbers of Arguments No Operation Accesses a Variable Declared in a Class from which its Receiver Class Inherits

47 Run Time Library Motivation: Provide Basic Concurrency Managment Single Program, Multiple Data Execution Model Single Address Space Alternate Serial and Parallel Phases Library Provides Task Creation and Synchronization Primitives Dynamic Load Balancing Implemented Stanford DASH Shared-Memory Multiprocessor SGI Shared-Memory Multiprocessors

48 Applications Barnes-Hut O(NlgN) N-Body Solver Space Subdivision Tree 1500 Lines of C++ Code Water Simulates Liquid Water O(N^2) Algorithm 1850 Lines of C++ Code

49 Obtaining Serial C++ Version of Barnes-Hut Started with Explicitly Parallel Version (SPLASH-2) Removed Parallel Constructs to get Serial C Converted to Clean Object-Based C++ Major Structural Changes Eliminated Scheduling Code and Data Structures Split a Loop in Force Computation Phase Introduced New Field into Particle Data Structure

50 Obtaining Serial C++ Version of Water Started with Serial C translated from FORTRAN Converted to Clean Object-Based C++ Major Structural Change Auxiliary Objects for O(N^2) phases

51 Commutativity Statistics for Barnes-Hut Position (3 Methods) Force (6 Methods) Velocity (3 Methods) Symbolically Executed Pairs Independent Pairs Pairs Tested for Commutativity Parallel Extent

52 Auxiliary Operation Statistics for Barnes-Hut Position (3 Methods) Force (6 Methods) Velocity (3 Methods) Call Sites Auxiliary Operation Call Sites Parallel Extent

53 Performance Results for Barnes-Hut Speedup J J J H J J J H H J J J H J H H H H H H Ideal Commutativity Analysis J H SPLASH-2 Barnes-Hut on DASH Data Set - 8K Particles Number of Processors Barnes-Hut on DASH Data Set - 16K Particles Number of Processors H H H J J J J J J J J J J H H H H H H H Ideal Commutativity Analysis J H SPLASH-2 Speedup

54 Performance Analysis Motivation: Understand Behavior of Parallelized Program Instrumented Code to Measure Execution Time Breakdowns Parallel Idle - Time Spent Idle in Parallel Section Serial Idle - Time Spent Idle in a Serial Section Blocked - Time Spent Waiting to Acquire a Lock Held by Another Processor Parallel Compute - Time Spent Doing Useful Work in a Parallel Section Serial Compute - Time Spent Doing Useful Work in a Serial Section

55 Performance Analysis for Barnes-Hut Barnes-Hut on DASH Data Set - 16K Particles Barnes-Hut on DASH Data Set - 8K Particles Cumulative Total Time (seconds) Number of Processors Cumulative Total Time (seconds) Number of Processors Serial Compute Parallel Compute Blocked Serial Idle Parallel Idle

56 Performance Results for Water J J J J J H H H H H H H H J H J J H J J J J J J J H H H J J J J J H H H H H H H Water on DASH Data Set Molecules Number of Processors Water on DASH Data Set Molecules Number of Processors Speedup Ideal Commutativity Analysis J H SPLASH-2 Ideal Commutativity Analysis J H SPLASH-2 Speedup

57 Performance Results for Computation Replication Version of Water H H H H H H H H H H J J J J J J J J J J H H H H H H H H H H J J J J J J J J J J Speedup Water on DASH Data Set Molecules Number of Processors Water on DASH Data Set Molecules Number of Processors Ideal Commutativity Analysis J H SPLASH-2 Ideal Commutativity Analysis J H SPLASH-2

58 Commutativity Statistics for Water Virtual (3 Methods) Forces (2 Methods) Loading (4 Methods) Momenta (2 Methods) Energy (5 Methods) Symbolically Executed Pairs Independent Pairs Pairs Tested for Commutativity Parallel Extent

59 Auxiliary Operation Statistics for Water Virtual (3 Methods) Forces (2 Methods) Loading (4 Methods) Momenta (2 Methods) Energy (5 Methods) Call Sites Auxiliary Operation Call Sites Parallel Extent

60 Performance Analysis for Water Water on DASH Data Set molecules Water on DASH Data Set molecules Cumulative Total Time (seconds) Number of Processors Cumulative Total Time (seconds) Number of Processors Serial Compute Parallel Compute Blocked Serial Idle Parallel Idle

61 Future Work Relative Commutativity Integrate Other Analysis Frameworks Pointer or Alias Analysis Array Data Dependence Analysis Analysis Problems Synchronization Optimizations Analysis Granularity Optimizations Generation of Self-Tuning Code Message Passing Implementation

62 Bernstein (IEEE Transactions on Computers 1966) Dependence Analysis for Pointer-Based Data Structures Reduction Analysis Ghuloum and Fisher (PPOPP 95) Pinter and Pinter (POPL 92) Callahan (LCPC 91) Commuting Operations in Parallel Languages Rinard and Lam (PPOPP 91) Steele (POPL 90) Barth, Nikhil and Arvind (FPCA 91) Related Work Landi, Ryder and Zhang (PLDI 93) Hendren, Hummel and Nicolau (PLDI 92) Plevyak, Karamcheti and Chien (LCPC 93) Chase, Wegman and Zadek (PLDI 90) Larus and Hilfinger (PLDI 88) Ghiya and Hendren (POPL 96) Ruf (PLDI 95) Wilson and Lam (PLDI 95) Deutsch (PLDI 94) Choi, Burke and Carini (POPL 93)

63 Conclusions

64 Conclusion Commutativity Analysis New Analysis Framework for Parallelizing Compilers Basic Idea Recognize Commuting Operations Generate Parallel Code Current Focus Dynamic, Pointer-Based Data Structures Good Initial Results Future Persistent Data Distributed Computations

65 Latest Version of Paper

66 What if Operations Do Not Commute? Parallel Tree Traversal Example: Distance of Node from Root class tree { int distance; tree *left; tree *right; }; tree::set_distance(int d) { distance = d; if (left != NULL) left->set_distance(d+1); if (right != NULL) right->set_distance(d+1); }

67 Equivalent Computation with Commuting Operations tree::sum_distance(int d) { distance = distance + d; if (left != NULL) left->sum_distance(d+1); if (right != NULL) right->sum_distance(d+1); } tree::zero_distance() { distance = 0; if (left != NULL) left->zero_distance(); if (right != NULL) right->zero_distance(); } tree::set_distance(int d) { zero_distance(); sum_distance(d); }

68 Theoretical Result For Any Tree Traversal on Data With A Commutative Operator (for example +) that has A Zero Element (for example 0) There Exists A Program P such that P Computes the Traversal Commutativity Analysis Can Automatically Parallelize P Complexity Results: Program P is asymptotically optimal if the Data Struture is a Perfectly Balanced Tree Program P has complexity O(N^2) if the Data Structure is a Linked-List

69 Pure Object-Based Model of Computation Goal Obtain a Powerful, Clean Model of Computation Enable Compiler to Analyze Program Objects: Instances of Classes Implement State with Instance Variables Primitive Types from Underlying Language (int,...) References to Other Objects Nested Objects Operations: Invocations of Methods Each Operation Has Single Receiver Object


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