Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR S T E P H E N P. R O B B I N S W W W. P R E N H A L L. C O M / R O B B I N S T E N T H E D I T I O N © 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR S T E P H E N P. R O B B I N S W W W. P R E N H A L L. C O M / R O B B I N S T E N T H E D I T I O N © 2003 Prentice Hall Inc."— Presentation transcript:

1 ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR S T E P H E N P. R O B B I N S W W W. P R E N H A L L. C O M / R O B B I N S T E N T H E D I T I O N © 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. All rights reserved. PowerPoint Presentation by Charlie Cook CHAPTER 6 & 7

2 © 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. All rights reserved.6–26–2 Defining Motivation Key Elements 1.Intensity: how hard a person tries 2.Direction: toward beneficial goal 3.Persistence: how long a person tries Key Elements 1.Intensity: how hard a person tries 2.Direction: toward beneficial goal 3.Persistence: how long a person tries

3 © 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. All rights reserved.6–36–3 Hierarchy of Needs Theory

4 © 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. All rights reserved.6–46–4 Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs E X H I B I T 6-1

5 © 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. All rights reserved.6–56–5 Theory X and Theory Y (Douglas McGregor)

6 From Concepts to Applications  Employee involvement – Theory Y –Participative management –Representative participation –Work councils –Quality Circles –Employee Stock Ownership Plans © 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. All rights reserved.6–66–6

7 6–76–7 Two-Factor Theory (Frederick Herzberg)

8 © 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. All rights reserved.6–86–8 Comparison of Satisfiers and Dissatisfiers E X H I B I T 6-3 Factors characterizing events on the job that led to extreme job dissatisfaction Factors characterizing events on the job that led to extreme job satisfaction

9 © 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. All rights reserved.6–96–9 Contrasting Views of Satisfaction and Dissatisfaction E X H I B I T 6-4 PresenceAbsence

10 © 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. All rights reserved.6–10 ERG Theory (Clayton Alderfer) Core Needs Existence: provision of basic material requirements. Relatedness: desire for relationships. Growth: desire for personal development. Core Needs Existence: provision of basic material requirements. Relatedness: desire for relationships. Growth: desire for personal development. Concepts: More than one need can be operative at the same time. If a higher-level need cannot be fulfilled, the desire to satisfy a lower- level need increases. Concepts: More than one need can be operative at the same time. If a higher-level need cannot be fulfilled, the desire to satisfy a lower- level need increases.

11 © 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. All rights reserved.6–11 David McClelland’s Theory of Needs nAch nPow nAff

12 © 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. All rights reserved.6–12 Matching Achievers and Jobs E X H I B I T 6-5

13 © 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. All rights reserved.6–13 Cognitive Evaluation Theory

14 © 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. All rights reserved.6–14 Goal-Setting Theory (Edwin Locke)

15 From Concepts to Applications  Management by Objectives – Goal Setting theory © 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. All rights reserved.6–15

16 © 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. All rights reserved.6–16 Reinforcement Theory Concepts: Behavior is environmentally caused. Behavior can be modified (reinforced) by providing (controlling) consequences. Reinforced behavior tends to be repeated. Concepts: Behavior is environmentally caused. Behavior can be modified (reinforced) by providing (controlling) consequences. Reinforced behavior tends to be repeated.

17 From Concepts to Applications  Employee Recognition Programs – Reinforcement theory © 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. All rights reserved.6–17

18 © 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. All rights reserved.6–18 Equity Theory Referent Comparisons: Self-inside Self-outside Other-inside Other-outside Referent Comparisons: Self-inside Self-outside Other-inside Other-outside

19 © 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. All rights reserved.6–19 Equity Theory (cont’d) E X H I B I T 6-7

20 © 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. All rights reserved.6–20 Equity Theory (cont’d) Choices for dealing with inequity: 1.Change inputs (slack off) 2.Change outcomes (increase output) 3.Distort/change perceptions of self 4.Distort/change perceptions of others 5.Choose a different referent person 6.Leave the field (quit the job) Choices for dealing with inequity: 1.Change inputs (slack off) 2.Change outcomes (increase output) 3.Distort/change perceptions of self 4.Distort/change perceptions of others 5.Choose a different referent person 6.Leave the field (quit the job)

21 © 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. All rights reserved.6–21 Equity Theory (cont’d) Propositions relating to inequitable pay: 1.Overrewarded employees produce more than equitably rewarded employees. 2.Overrewarded employees produce less, but do higher quality piece work. 3.Underrewarded hourly employees produce lower quality work. 4.Underrewarded employees produce larger quantities of lower-quality piece work than equitably rewarded employees Propositions relating to inequitable pay: 1.Overrewarded employees produce more than equitably rewarded employees. 2.Overrewarded employees produce less, but do higher quality piece work. 3.Underrewarded hourly employees produce lower quality work. 4.Underrewarded employees produce larger quantities of lower-quality piece work than equitably rewarded employees

22 © 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. All rights reserved.6–22 Equity Theory (cont’d)

23 From Concepts to Applications  Skill-based Pay Plans – ERG / Reinforcement / Equity Theories © 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. All rights reserved.6–23

24 © 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. All rights reserved.6–24 Expectancy Theory E X H I B I T 6-8

25 From Concepts to Applications  Variable Pay Programs – Expectancy Theory  Flexible Benefits – Expectancy Theory © 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. All rights reserved.6–25

26 © 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. All rights reserved.6–26 Performance Dimensions E X H I B I T 6-9

27  Recognize individual differences  Use goals and feedback  Allow employees to participate in decisions that affect them  Link rewards to performance  Check the system for equity © 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. All rights reserved.6–27


Download ppt "ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR S T E P H E N P. R O B B I N S W W W. P R E N H A L L. C O M / R O B B I N S T E N T H E D I T I O N © 2003 Prentice Hall Inc."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google