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Planet Health By Jill Carter, MA, EdM, Jean L. Wiecha, PhD, Karen E. Peterson, RD, ScD, Suzanne Nobrega, MS, and Steven L. Gortmaker, PhD A project of.

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Presentation on theme: "Planet Health By Jill Carter, MA, EdM, Jean L. Wiecha, PhD, Karen E. Peterson, RD, ScD, Suzanne Nobrega, MS, and Steven L. Gortmaker, PhD A project of."— Presentation transcript:

1 Planet Health By Jill Carter, MA, EdM, Jean L. Wiecha, PhD, Karen E. Peterson, RD, ScD, Suzanne Nobrega, MS, and Steven L. Gortmaker, PhD A project of the: Harvard Prevention Research Center on Nutrition and Physical Activity Harvard School of Public Health

2 Planet Health Introductory Workshop Agenda Topics I.Introductions II.What Is Planet Health? (Presentation) III.Are You Concerned About Your Students Nutrition and Physical Activity Habits? (Discussion) IV.The Health of Young People: Trends in Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Inactivity (Presentation) V.Turning the Tables: Why Schools Need to Be Part of the Solution (Presentation) VI.Using the Planet Health Curriculum (Presentation) VII.Planet Healths Nutrition and Physical Activity Messages (Activities) VIII.Talking to Youth About Nutrition and Physical Activity Habits (Questions)

3 Planet Health Demonstration Lessons Lesson 1 (introductory classroom lesson) Do You Make Space for Fitness and Nutrition? Lesson 2 Power Down: Charting Screen Time Lesson 21 (science) Fat Functions Lesson 19 (science) Passing the Sugar Lesson 5 (language arts) The Language of Food Lesson 34 (social studies) Impact of Technology Lesson 15 (math) Plotting Coordinate Graphs: What Does Your Day Look Like? Introduction to FitCheck (physical education)

4 What Is Planet Health? An interdisciplinary health curriculum for middle school students that teaches students about nutrition and physical activity A curriculum that builds skills and competencies in language arts, math, science, social studies, and physical education

5 Planet Health Goals

6 Planet Health Overview

7 Planet Healths Educational Approach

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12 Why Implement THIS Program?

13 Planet Health has been evaluated and shown to be effective in a scientific study. It improves student knowledge of nutrition and physical activity. It reduces TV viewing time in both boys and girls. It increases fruit and vegetable consumption in girls. It reduces obesity in girls.

14 Teachers report that … They felt competent teaching the health content. They were able to choose lessons that fit into their curriculum. They enjoyed the student-centered teaching techniques. Planet Health had a positive effect on their own health. Planet Health helped them to connect with their students.

15 Are you concerned about your students nutrition and physical activity habits?

16 The Health of Young People: Trends in Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Inactivity

17 Youth Are at Risk! Trends in Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Inactivity Seventy percent of youth eat more saturated fat than experts recommend. Youth drink twice as much soda as milk. Eighty percent of youth do not eat 5 or more fruits and vegetables per day.* Thirty-seven percent of older youth watch 3 or more hours of TV per day.* Sixty-four percent of high school students do not get the recommended amount of daily physical activity.* *CDC, Youth Risk Behavior Survey, 2005.

18 Youth are at Risk! Trends in Overweight Prevalence of overweight among U.S. children and adolescents NHANES , National Center for Health Statistics

19 Health Consequences of Overweight Overweight and obese people are at increased risk for the following: Type 2 diabetes Depression High cholesterol Heart disease Premature death Stroke Hypertension Asthma Some cancers Adapted from: USSDHHS.The Surgeon Generals Call to Action to Prevent and Decrease Overweight and Obesity, 2001.

20 Environmental and Social Change Affect Health Behavior More food available Growth of the food industry and advertising More meals away from home More sugar-sweetened beverages Large serving sizes More TV/video games More car travel Fewer PE classes Fewer students walking and biking to school Lower perception of safety

21 What do TV viewing and soda consumption have to do with it?

22 Distribution of Hours of TV per Day: NHES Youth Aged in and NLSY Youth Aged in 1990 Data from Dietz, W.H., Gortmaker, S.L Do we fatten our children at the television set? Obesity and television viewing in children and adolescents. Pediatrics 75:

23 Prevalence of Obesity by Hours of TV per Day: NHES Youth Aged in and NLSY Youth Aged in 1990 Data from Dietz, W.H., Gortmaker, S.L Do we fatten our children at the television set? Obesity and television viewing in children and adolescents. Pediatrics 75:

24 Hypothesized Impact of Television Viewing on Obesity

25 Beverage Intake Among Adolescents Aged 11-18, Data from C. Cavadini et al., U.S, Community child health, public health, and epidemiology, Archives of Disease in Children 83: (based on USDA surveys).

26 Soft Drink Consumption and Overweight Sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) contribute to childhood obesity incidence. –A recent study found that for each additional serving of SSB consumed per day, the incidence of obesity increased. Reducing the intake of sugar-sweetened beverages can reduce overweight among youth. –A recent study found that the intake of carbonated drinks could be decreased, and that this change was accompanied by a decrease in the percentage of overweight and obese children. –A pilot study found that when teens reduced SSB consumption by replacing SSBs with noncaloric beverages, they lost a pound a month.

27 Turning the Tables: Why Schools Need to Be Part of the Solution

28 Promoting Healthy Eating and Active Living

29 Healthy Eating and Physical Activity Are a Critical Part of Learning and Achievement Eating breakfast increases academic test scores, daily attendance, concentration, and class participation. Children learn through movement. Physically fit kids perform better academically. Gross motor development is an important precursor for the fine motor skills needed for writing and the eye coordination needed for smooth tracking during reading. Children spend more time reading and doing homework when parents set limits on TV viewing.

30 Using the Planet Health Curriculum Guide

31 Book Organization Section 1: Implementing Planet Health in Your School Section 2: Classroom Lessons Foundation lessons Language arts Math Science Social studies Secton 3: Physical Education Microunits

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33 Appendixes Appendix A: Nutrition Resources Appendix B: Physical Activity Resources Appendix C: Television and Other Screen Time Resources Appendix D: Social Studies Resources Appendix E: Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks

34 Implementation Overview

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36 Impact of Techology

37 Impact of Techology (continued)

38 Do You Make Space for Fitness and Nutrition? Lesson 1 Introduction: Student Self-Assessment

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41 Planet Health Goals

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43 Healthy Eating and Active Living: Make you strong and fit. Brighten your mood and build a positive self- image. Help you maintain a healthy weight. Are important for learning. Are fun!

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45 Curriculum Connections Existing parent/family connections in the Planet Health curriculum: Lesson #SubjectLesson NameType of Activity DescriptionPage # 1 IntroductionDo You Make Space for Fitness and Nutrition? Teacher-parent correspondence Info letter to parents asks them to reinforce Planet Health messages at home. 7 Language artsWrite a Fable: Important Messages About Activity Teacher resources: specific background material Example of playing catch with a friend or parent to increase student activity. 7 Language artsWrite a Fable: Important Messages About Activity Reading comprehension Text advises students to talk with parents if they notice any signs of too much exercise. 8 Language artsGo for the GoalExtension activityStudents interview a member of their family to find out whether they have any goals for themselves. 9 Language artsLifetime Physical Activities: Research One, Describe One, Try One! Extension activity 9.1 Publish a Planet Health newsletter and send copies home to parents. 10 Language artsChoosing Healthy FoodsExtension activity, 2nd question Besides TV, what other parts of your life influence your food choices? (Examples: family, friends, etc.)

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48 Lets take a break!

49 Planet Healths Nutrition and Physical Activity Messages

50 Planet Health Goals

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53 Whats the Rap on Fat? Not All Fat Is Created Equal

54 Planet Health Fat Message Eat a diet low in saturated fat and containing no trans fat. 10% saturated fat 25-35% total fat Try to eliminate trans fat.

55 Planet Health Carbohydrate Message Choose whole-grain foods and limit foods and beverages with added sugars. Make at least half of your grains whole grains. Sugar-sweetened beverages and high-sugar snacks are sometimes foods, not everyday foods.

56 Activity 1 Soda and Sports Drinks: How many do you drink? Number in last 7 days Grams per serving Grams per container Total gramsTotal teaspoons 12-ounce soda 10-ounce soda 10-ounce sports drink Bottled water Other Total

57 Planet Health Fruits and Vegetables Message Eat five or more fruits and vegetables each day. Eat at least two fruits each day. Eat at least three vegetables each day. - At least one should be orange or dark green.

58 Language arts lesson 5: The Language of Food Something Green for Dinner They served something green for dinner And we wondered what it was. Kenny whispered that it looked like Someones old lawn-mower fuzz. Dad said, Try a bite, youll like it! We said, Tell us, please, what is it? Dad said, Ground up alien fern-tips From the Martian spaceships visit. (They tasted great with the burgers.) Jeff Moss

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60 Planet Health Inactivity Message Limit screen time to no more than two hours each day. Screen time = TV + videos + movies + video and computer games (Doesnt include schoolwork completed on a computer.)

61 Social studies lesson 34: Impact of Technology

62 Social studies lesson 34: Impact of Technology (continued)

63 Social studies lesson 34: Impact of Technology How do computers, TV, the Internet, and DVDs affect the daily physical activity of children your age? Compare your physical activity to the physical activity of children living in the early 1800s. Give several details to support your answer. How do you account for the difference? Compare your free time to the free time of children living in the 1800s. How do you account for the difference?

64 Social studies lesson 34: Impact of Technology

65 Power Down: Charting Screen Time

66 Lesson 2 Power Down: Charting TV Viewing Time Weekly TV Viewing Histogram

67 Planet Health Activity Message: Be active daily or nearly every day. Be moderately to vigorously active for at least 60 minutes each day. As part of the 60 minutes, be vigorously active for at least 20 minutes three times a week.

68 Physical Activity Intensity Sedentary activities Low-intensity activities Moderate- intensity activities Vigorous activities Playing video games Watching TV Sleeping Talking on phone Bowling Playing catch Stretching Washing dishes Shooting baskets Skateboarding Hopscotch Raking Running Biking Lap swimming Push-ups Sit-ups Shoveling snow

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72 Talking to Youth About Nutrition and Physical Activity Habits Group Discussion Activity

73 For more information, please go to


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