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Safety Facts What Is P.P.E. What Is O.S.H.A. Shop Safety Rules Blood Bourne pathogens Environmental Safety Fire Safety.

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Presentation on theme: "Safety Facts What Is P.P.E. What Is O.S.H.A. Shop Safety Rules Blood Bourne pathogens Environmental Safety Fire Safety."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Safety Facts What Is P.P.E. What Is O.S.H.A. Shop Safety Rules Blood Bourne pathogens Environmental Safety Fire Safety

3 Safety Facts

4 The number one priority of any business should be the safety of its employees. “ The employer is responsible for the safety training of each employee and for providing a safe working environment for all employees.” -Tim Gilles Delmar Learning 2004 Federal law mandates every automotive shop to have a safety training program. (Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970) Legal precedent exist for the criminal prosecution of employers who do not provide documented safety training, resulting in the death of employees.

5 The employee is responsible for safe practices and considerations reducing the risk of accident and injury. Safe practices should include: 1.Use of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) 2.Regular inspection of tools and equipment 3.Maintaining a clean and organized workplace 4.Conducting repairs according to manufacturers specifications Safety considerations should include: 1.Personal safety 2.The safety of co-workers 3.The safety of customers 4.Maintaining a safe work environment

6 Most Accidents and Injuries in a Commercial or Industrial Work Place are the Result of Unsafe Acts by People. Just because the nature of a job is inherently dangerous does not mean that does not mean that we can not do the job in a safe manner this is where safe practices and safety considerations come into play. Look at the picture to the right and find three unsafe acts by this person.

7 What Is P.P.E.

8 P.P.E. Stands for Personal Protective Equipment O.S.H.A. Requires certain kinds of P.P.E. to be worn at all times when working in a commercial shop or industrial environment. “The most important Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) a technician should wear all the time are safety glasses, which meet standard ANSI Z87.1” -James Halderman, Darrel Deeter Pearson Education, Inc 2013 Under the O.S.H.A. act of 1970 it is the law. Employees who choose not observe this law can face steep fines and termination.

9 ANSI Approved, What Does That Mean? (ANSI) is the American National Standards Institute. ANSI sets minimum standards that impact the global market place from safety concerns to weights and measures. aspx?menuid=1 aspx?menuid=1 Standard Z87.1 is the Practice for Occupational and Educational Eye and Face Protection. Eye and face protection meeting this standard are guaranteed to be shatter proof to prevent additional injury from impact.

10 What other Kinds Of P.P.E. Are There? Hard Hats, Helmets, and Bump Caps Various Types of Face Shields. Various Types of Gloves Various Types of Jump Suits Various Types of Aprons Various Types of Ear Protection Various Types of Foot Protection

11 What Kinds of P.P.E. Are Required In the Stafford Automotive Technology Program and When? The Automotive Facility is a P.P.E. Zone Anyone who enters the shop shall wear ANSI z87.1 approved safety glasses at all times. Safety Glasses can be obtained at the classroom door and must be signed for before entering the Automotive Shop.

12 What Kinds of P.P.E. Are Required In the Stafford Automotive Technology Program and When? Nitrile gloves will be worn whenever pouring, mixing, or working with cleaning solvents, gasoline, or if blood and bodily fluids need to be cleaned up. Nitrile gloves offer a comfortable fit and conform to the hand. They are extremely strong. Nitrile resist swelling and decomposition when exposed to gasoline oil and solvents. Latex gloves should never be used in an automotive shop.

13 What Kinds of P.P.E. Are Required In the Stafford Automotive Technology Program and When? Chemistry aprons need to be worn when using the parts washing sink, servicing the vehicles cooling system, and performing fuel induction services. Chemistry aprons will help prevent and reduce possible allergic skin reactions to chemicals used to perform those shop tasks.

14 What Kinds of P.P.E. Are Required In the Stafford Automotive Technology Program and When? Face Shields need to be worn when using the parts washing sink, servicing the vehicles cooling system, performing fuel induction services, or working with any propellants. Face shields will help to prevent accidental ingestion of chemicals that could splash into the mouth. Face shields will also prevent your eyes and skin from exposure to harsh and corrosive chemicals.

15 What Kinds of P.P.E. Are Required In the Stafford Automotive Technology Program and When? Sound Dampening Ear Muffs need to be worn whenever you are working with air chisels, hammer and grinders. Sound Dampening Ear Muffs will protect your ears against sounds greater then 90 decibels (dB). Sounds greater then 90dB can cause permanent hearing loss. It is important to note that many lawnmowers and weed eaters are louder then 90dB.

16 What Kinds of P.P.E. Are Required In the Stafford Automotive Technology Program and When? Jump suits, leather gloves, welding masks and other P.P.E. may be required when working on welding projects or with oxygen acetylene torches to prevent burns to the hand and body.

17 What Kinds of P.P.E. Are Required In the Stafford Automotive Technology Program and When? Respirators and face masks are required when working with paint sprayers or drum brakes that could contain asbestos. Respirators have carbon and HEPA filters to filter out possible carcinogens that can cause sever lung infections and even mesothelioma or lung cancer.

18 What Is O.S.H.A.

19 What is O.S.H.A. O.S.H.A. stands for the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. O.S.H.A. is a division of the United States Department of Labor. The mission of O.S.H.A. is “to assure safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women by setting and enforcing standards and by providing training, outreach, education and assistance.”

20 What is O.S.H.A. O.S.H.A. was created in 1970 when congress approved the Occupational Safety and Health Act. O.S.H.A. has regional and state field offices and conducts regular surveys of work places to ensure the safety of workers. O.S.H.A. Offer 10 hour and 30 hour training classes for employees requiring specialized safety training.

21 Shop Safety Rules

22 P.P.E. must be worn at all times. That guy is an idiot ! Don’t be that guy. Ask yourself, “is this safe?” before you do it. Horseplay is never permitted in the shop. Stay in your appointed work area unless otherwise instructed. Move through the shop and your work are in a counter clockwise pattern. Always yield to the person closest to the shop door. Observe all warning placards on shop equipment. What Safety Rules Do I have to Follow in the Automotive Shop? Never use dull or broken tools. Report this condition immediately so they can be repaired or replaced. Clean your work area as you go. Never use equipment that is missing safety guards, has frayed wires, missing ground prongs or with faulty safety locks. Report these conditions to the instructor immediately.

23 Observe all Safety Standard Operating Procedures as if your life or somebody else's life depends on it. Many times it does. Finally if it doesn't look right or feel right it probably isn’t. STOP AND CONSULT YOUR INSTRUCTOR. What Safety Rules Do I have to Follow in the Automotive Shop?

24 Blood Borne pathogens

25 What Are Blood-borne Pathogens? According to O.S.H.A. “Blood-borne pathogens are infectious microorganisms present in blood that can cause disease in humans. These pathogens include, but are not limited to, hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the virus that causes AIDS. Workers exposed to blood- borne pathogens are at risk for serious or life-threatening illnesses.”

26 O.S.H.A. and Blood-borne Pathogens “All of the requirements of OSHA’s Blood-borne Pathogens standard can be found in Title 29 of the Code of Federal Regulations at 29 CFR ” “The standard protects workers who can reasonably be anticipated to come into contact with blood or Other Potentially Infectious Materials (OPIM) as a result of doing their job duties.” These employees must receive annual training on the risks of blood-borne pathogens and have a response plan of action for dealing with blood and OPIM.

27 What Do I kneed to Know About Them? Never allow yourself to come into direct contact with someone else's blood. When dealing with blood always use the appropriate P.P.E. This can be found in a blood and bodily fluid spill kit. If you become injured and blood is present and you are not incapacitated always clean and dress your own wound.

28 What Do I kneed to Know About Them? If your skin come into contact with blood or OPIM wash the area with antimicrobial soap and flush the area with running water for at least 15 minutes. If your eyes come into contact with blood or OPIM flush them with running water for at least 15 minutes. If your mouth comes into contact with blood or OPIM flush with running water for at least 15 minutes. DO NOT SWALLOW WATER.

29 Facts about Blood-borne pathogens Finally, if you come into contact with blood or OPIM after flushing the area report the incident to your employer immediately. They are responsible for follow up care. Next, go to the nearest emergency room and describe the contamination to them. They can administer antiretroviral drugs that can prevent infection. This must happen within 4 hours of exposure to be effective.

30 Environmental Safety

31 Environmental Concerns and Automotive Repair Many environmental concerns in the automotive repair industry stem from the heavy use of chemicals. These chemicals may be considered hazardous materials or hazardous waste. There are industry standards for dealing with both materials and waste.

32 What Are Hazardous Materials? A chemical with hazardous properties can only be considered MATERIALS if it is still considered useful. There are 9 classes of hazardous materials. In the automotive industry the hazardous materials we use most are: A.Class 2 Gases B.Class 3 Flammable Liquids C.Class 5 Oxidizers D.Class 8 Corrosives

33 Right to Know Laws and Hazardous Materials “The Right to Know Laws state that employees have the right to know when the materials they use at work are hazardous” -James Halderman, Darrel Deeter Pearson Education Inc Right to know laws are the result of the Hazard Communication Standard published by O.S.H.A. in 1983 Employers must Provide make accessible to all employees a Material Safety Data Sheet M.S.D.S. for all potentially hazardous materials they will work with.

34 The M.S.D.S. Sheet The M.S.D.S. sheet consist of 9 sections they are: 1.Section 1 - Product Information 2.Section 2 - Hazardous Ingredients 3.Section 3 - Physical Data 4.Section 4 - Fire & Explosion Data 5.Section 5 - Reactivity Data 6.Section 6 - Toxicological Properties 7.Section 7 - Preventative Measures 8.Section 8 - First Aid Measures 9.Section 9 - Preparation information If you or a co-worker come in contact with Hazardous materials refer to the M.S.D.S.

35 What Kinds of Hazardous Materials are Used in an Automotive Shop? Gasoline Diesel Fuel Kerosene Motor Oil Parts Washing Solvents Glycol Antifreeze

36 What is Hazardous Waste? A chemical with hazardous properties can only be considered WASTE only if it is no longer considered useful. Under the Code of Federal Regulation (CFR) the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) considers waste hazardous if it has one or more of the following characteristics: A.Reactive: Any waste that reacts violently to other chemicals B.Corrosive: Waste that burn the skin or dissolves metals or other materials C.Toxic: Waste containing 1 or more of the 8 heavy metals in concentrates of more that 100 times the standard of drinking water. D.Ignitable: Liquid waste with a flash point below 140º F (60ºC) Solid waste that can ignite spontaneously E.Radioactive: Any waste that emits measurable levers of radiation.

37 What is Hazardous Waste? All hazardous waste must be captured and properly stored until it can be recycled, incinerated, or properly disposed of. In the automotive shop the most common hazardous waste is: A.Used Motor Oil B.Used Coolant C.Used Batteries D.Cleaning solvents E.Asbestos brake linings

38 Fire Safety

39 Fire Safety and the Automotive Shop Car fires can reach temperatures of 2,370ºF and can very quickly get out of control due to the ignitable characteristics of fuels such as gasoline and diesel fuel. Other components of the vehicle are extremely flammable like the battery and the trim and upholstery. The problem of car fires in the Automotive shop is compounded by the use of flammable solvents, torches, grinders, and welding equipment. It is extremely important to understand what to do in the event of a fire in the automotive shop.

40 Types of Fires There are 4 classes of fire extinguishers 1.Class A: General combustibles – Cloth, Wood and Paper 2. Class B: Flammable liquids – Gasoline, Diesel Fuel, Grease, Motor Oil and Solvents.

41 Types of Fires There are 4 classes of fire extinguishers 1.Class C: Electrical – Fires caused by arching electrical circuits 2. Class D: Combustible Metals – Fires fuel by powdered aluminum, sodium, and magnesium.

42 Know Your Fire Know Your Fire Extinguisher Using the wrong type of fire extinguisher can cause the fire to spread, resulting in injury and even death.

43 How to Use a Fire Extinguisher


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