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1 Institute Facilitated By Merle Siefken Parent and Educator Partnership 25 S. Washington, Suite 106 Naperville, IL 60540 www.pepartnership.org 630 428.

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Presentation on theme: "1 Institute Facilitated By Merle Siefken Parent and Educator Partnership 25 S. Washington, Suite 106 Naperville, IL 60540 www.pepartnership.org 630 428."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Institute Facilitated By Merle Siefken Parent and Educator Partnership 25 S. Washington, Suite 106 Naperville, IL

2 2 Get-to-Know-Your Colleagues Get-to-Know Your Neighbors Quickly, introduce yourself to the others at your table: 1. Name. 2. Where you work. 3. Something about yourself that we cannot tell by looking at you. INTRODUCTIONS

3 3 District Leadership Institute By the end of this workshop, you will be able to: Explain the Six Types of Family Involvement Conduct a One-Day Team-Training Workshop for your schools’ Action Teams for Partnerships Guide schools to write an effective One-Year Action Plan for Partnerships Describe the roles and responsibilities of district facilitators Select strategies for effective leadership and facilitation on partnerships for your district Draft a district leadership plan for Identify PEP resources to help you with your work

4 4 Research shows that: Students with involved parents – no matter what their income or background – are more likely to do better in school, stay in school longer, and like school more. Partnership programs can increase student achievements, improve attendance and behavior, and promote positive social skills. When partnership practices are tightly linked to school goals, families become involved in ways that directly assist students’ learning and success. Why is it important to involve families and the community in children’s education?

5 5 Why is it important for DISTRICTS to have a LEADER for PARTNERSHIPS? Research shows that: When district leaders provide training and facilitation to schools’ Action Teams for Partnerships, their schools: Have higher quality partnership programs Address more challenges to involve all families, including those who are typically “hard to reach.”

6 6 Understand the Framework of Six Types of Involvement

7 7 Keys to School, Family, and Community Partnerships FRAMEWORK OF SIX TYPES OF INVOLVEMENT PARENTING COMMUNICATING VOLUNTEERING LEARNING AT HOME DECISION MAKING COLLABORATING WITH COMMUNITY Type 1 Type 2 Type 6 Type 5 Type 4 Type 3

8 8 Housing, health, nutrition, clothing, safety Parenting skills for all age levels Home conditions that support children as students at all grade levels Information and activities from families to help schools understand children and families Type 1 PARENTING Basic Responsibilities of Families

9 9 Memos, notices, report cards, conferences, newsletters, phone calls, computerized messages, , websites Two-way channels of communication for questions and interactions SCHOOL-TO-HOME HOME-TO-SCHOOL Type 2 COMMUNICATING Basic Responsibilities of Schools

10 10 In School or Classroom Attend assemblies, performances, sports events, recognition, and award ceremonies, celebrations, and other events VOLUNTEERS AUDIENCES Type 3 VOLUNTEERING Involvement At and For the School For School or Classroom

11 11 Keys to School, Family, and Community Partnerships FRAMEWORK OF SIX TYPES OF INVOLVEMENT PARENTING COMMUNICATING VOLUNTEERING Type 1 Type 2Type 3 Share ONE successful example of these 3 types of involvement that YOU have seen in schools.

12 12 How to help at home with homework Required skills to pass each subject Curriculum-related decisions Other skills and talents Type 4 LEARNING AT HOME Involvement in Academic Activities Activities for parent and child on...

13 13 Other school or district committees Type 5 DECISION MAKING Participation and Leadership School Improvement Team or School Council Action Team for Partnerships PTA/PTO

14 14 Community contributes to the school, students, and families Type 6 COLLABORATING WITH THE COMMUNITY Business partners Cultural and recreational groups Health services Service and volunteer groups Senior citizen organizations Faith-based organizations Government and military agencies Other groups and programs School, students, and families contribute to the community

15 15 Keys to School, Family, and Community Partnerships NNPS FRAMEWORK OF SIX TYPES OF INVOLVEMENT LEARNING AT HOME DECISION MAKING COLLABORATING WITH THE COMMUNITY Type 6 Type 5 Type 4 Share ONE successful example of these 3 types of involvement that YOU have seen in schools.

16 16 An Inventory of Present Practices of School, Family, and Community Partnerships Your TABLE will be assigned ONE TYPE of involvement. 1.LOOK. With a partner, look down the list of activities for the TYPE you were assigned. 2.CHECK. Check the activities conducted in your school (or schools you supervise or assist) and the grade levels that conduct each activity. 3.REFLECT: What comes to mind as you think about the activities conducted for that TYPE of involvement? 4.CONTINUE. If you finish and there still is time, select another TYPE of involvement to review.

17 17 Meet the Challenges to Reach All Families and Learn “Re-definitions” for Good Partnerships

18 18 Challenge Provide information to all families who want or need it, not just to the few who attend workshops or meetings at the program site. Redefinition “Workshop” is not only a meeting on a topic held at the school building at a particular time, but also the content of a topic to be viewed, heard, or read at convenient times and varied locations. Type 1 - Parenting

19 19 Challenge Make all communications clear for all families in languages and formats that they can understand. Redefinition “Communications about school programs and student progress” are not only from school to home but also include two-way channels of communication that connect schools, families, students, and the community. Type 2 - Communicating

20 20 Challenge Recruit widely for volunteers so that all families know that their time and talents are welcome. Redefinition “Volunteer” not only means someone who comes to school during the day, but also anyone who supports program goals and children’s learning in any way, at any place, and at any time. Type 3 - Volunteering

21 21 Challenge Develop homework procedures that encourage students to share something with a parent that they are learning in class or in an after-school program. Redefinition “Homework” not only means work that students do alone, but also interactive activities that students share with others at home or in the community, linking schoolwork to real life. Type 4 - Learning at Home

22 22 Challenge Include parent leaders from all racial, ethnic, socioeconomic, and other groups in the school. Redefinition “Decision making” is a process of partnership – sharing views, solving problems, and taking action toward shared goals, not just a power struggle between conflicting ideas. Type 5 - Decision Making

23 23 Challenge Inform all families and students about community programs and services. Redefinition “Community” includes not only families with children in the schools, but also all who are interested in and affected by the quality of education. Type 6 - Collaborating with the Community

24 24 15 Minute Break

25 25 Challenge-Go-Round 1. Identify a challenge that your schools must solve to involve hard to reach families. 2. At the signal, go ’round the room and write a solution to the challenges. 3. Select one solution that may work in your schools.

26 26 Reaching Results and Goals for Student Success 1. Each type of involvement has been linked to specific results for students. 2. All six types of involvement can be designed and implemented to contribute to specific school improvement goals.

27 27 Reaching Results for Students Type 1 – Parenting Improve students’ attendance in school. Type 2 – Communicating Increase students’ awareness of their own progress in subjects and skills. Type 3 – Volunteering Students gain academic skills that are tutored or taught by volunteers. Type 4 – Learning At Home Students complete more homework in specific subjects. Type 5 – Decision Making Students benefit from goal-linked policies and projects enacted, conducted, and supported by parent organizations. Type 6 – Collaborating with Students gain skills and talents in the Community curricular and extracurricular projects and experiences with community partners.

28 28 Members of an ATP work together to: Review school improvement goals Select, plan, implement, and evaluate family and community involvement activities linked to school goals. Continually improve partnership practices. Action Team for Partnerships (ATP)

29 29 Members of an ATP are: 2-3 teachers or more 2-3 parents/family members or more Principal (or assistant principal) Other members (nurse, counselor, community partners) 1-2 students on high school Action Team for Partnerships (ATP)

30 30 School Improvement Team: SIT oversees the entire school improvement plan SIT meets monthly to discuss all programs, assess progress, and plan for all goals in the SIP SIT hears committee reports and assists committees to reach goals School Improvement Team & Action Team for Partnerships Action Team for Partnerships: ATP oversees the goals in the SIP for family and community involvement ATP meets monthly to discuss the schedule of family and community involvement activities in the One- Year Action Plan, assess progress, and improve plans ATP provides committee reports to the SIT

31 31 School Improvement Core Team ATPBehaviorReadingWriting School Improvement Goals Team

32 32 Academic GOAL 1 Practices from TYPES 1-6 To meet this goal Academic GOAL 2 Practices from TYPES 1-6 To meet this goal Nonacademic GOAL 3 Practices from TYPES 1-6 To meet this goal Partnership GOAL 4 Practices from TYPES 1-6 To meet this goal School Improvement Core Team Action Team for Partnerships

33 33 TABLE TOP DISCUSSION HOW WILL YOUR SCHOOL ORGANIZE AN ACTION TEAM FOR PARTNERSHIPS (ATP)? Each school must discuss and decide: 1.WHO will be the members and leaders of your school’s ATP? 2.WHEN will the whole Action Team for Partnerships (ATP) meet? 3.HOW WILL STAKEHOLDERS hear from the ATP about its plans and progress on family and community involvement? 4.BE REALISTIC about how frequently reports should be made. What questions do you have about the ATP?

34 34 Creating Goal Plans

35 35 Improve STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT in reading – PAGE 1 Family Reading Night Weekly interactive homework in reading and writing Parent/community volunteer book buddies and book talks Improve STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT in math – PAGE 2 Family Math Night After-school tutoring program in math PTA fundraiser for computer software Increase STUDENT ATTENDANCE rates – PAGE 3 Attendance team with family volunteers Attendance and lateness policies in the school newsletter Family dinner with principal for improved attendance Strengthen the CLIMATE of partnerships – PAGE 4 Reformat the newsletter to be more family-friendly Welcome walks through the neighborhoods Family-School picnic before school starts in the fall School Improvement Goals Lead to a 4-Page One-Year Action Plan for Partnerships

36 36 One-Year Action Plan for Partnerships Goal Plan Goals – 2 academic goals, 1 behavioral goal –1 welcoming climate for partnerships Desired results – measurable Assessments / Specific measures Partnership activities Types of involvement Dates of activities Grade levels involved Preliminary actions that must be taken Resources or funds needed Persons in charge and helping

37 37 Use the Six Types to Reach Results For this activity, use a school improvement goal to: At your table, place the goal for student success in the middle of your Goals Map. Focus on one goal. Select one activity for each type of involvement to involve families and the community in productive ways to help students reach that goal. ACTIVITY: GOALS MAP

38 38

39 39 ACTIVITY: GOALS PLAN

40 40

41 41 TRY IT! Let’s Write ONE PAGE of a School’s One- Year Action Plan for Partnerships! In this activity you will: Experience the work YOUR schools’ ATP will do at your team-training workshop and the questions that may arise. Understand the District Facilitator’s role in helping ATPs IMPROVE THEIR PLANS.

42 42 Afternoon Session Starts promptly at 1:00 pm Lunch

43 43 Afternoon Session Begin at 1:00 pm End at 3:30 pm

44 44 District Leadership Institute This morning : Six Types of Family Involvement Starting Points – a survey Challenge Go-Round – problem solving Action Team for Partnerships and the School Improvement Team One-Year Action Plan for Partnerships – connecting to your school improvement goals.

45 45 District Leadership Institute This afternoon : Continuation of Goal Plans, as needed. Describe the roles and responsibilities of district facilitators Draft a district leadership plan for Identify PEP resources to help you with your work

46 46 What’s in a name? A District Facilitator is an external coach, serving as the SFCP specialist, and charged by the school district to lead district-level partnership programs and directly facilitate schools to help them strengthen their programs and practices of family and community involvement which support the school improvement goals. DISTRICT FACILITATOR FOR PARTNERSHIPS KEY CONTACT to PEP

47 47 External Coach Family Involvement Coordinator/Director Student Services Coordinator Title I /NCLB Director Community Relations Coordinator District Volunteer Coordinator Project Specialist Community Relations Director Director of Parent Engagement Public Relations Specialist Support Services Supervisor District Facilitator Titles

48 48 District Facilitator Leadership Review or guide the writing of district policy on family involvement, consistent with the framework and approaches Conduct district-wide staff development on partnerships Write column on partnerships for district newsletter Make presentations on partnerships Collect best practices from schools to share throughout the district Conduct OTHER district-level leadership activities on partnerships

49 49 Conduct one-day workshops for Action Teams for Partnerships (ATP) Make monthly site visits to schools or equivalent contacts Hold periodic cluster meetings for ATP Chairs Schedule annual meetings with principals Convene end-of-year (or mid-year) celebrations for ATPs to discuss challenges, share best practices, write next plans Help ATPs evaluate programs and progress Facilitate schools in OTHER ways to improve their partnership programs District Facilitation of Schools

50 50 Research and Field Work with District Facilitators Show: A district facilitator (or director for partnerships) must write an annual Leadership Action Plan for Partnerships, including district-level actions and facilitation of schools. The district must allocate a budget for this work. District Facilitators must EVALUATE district-level and school-based PROGRESS on partnerships in order to improve from year to year. Facilitation MAY BE shared with colleagues at the district office. Leadership WILL BE shared with the Chairs or Co-Chairs and principals of schools’ ATPs.

51 51 Administrative Support Superintendent Other Administrators School Board District Policy Building Principals Others in Your District? District Leaders for Partnership do more and better with support from:

52 52 Collegial Support Title I ESOL/Bilingual Special Education Curriculum & Instruction Research/Evaluation Business Roundtable Others in YOUR district? District Leaders for Partnership do more and better with INTERDEPARTMENTAL support from:

53 53 MAJOR SOURCES OF FUNDS for Partnership Programs Title 1 and other federal programs Curriculum and Instruction Bilingual Education Safe and Drug Free Schools General Funds Special Education State Compensatory Education or other state programs and grants Superintendents’ discretionary funds Foundation grants

54 54 Illinois An Excellent District Program AdministrativeSupport Collegial Support Financial Support What specific supports do you already have in YOUR district? Path to An Excellent District Partnership Program

55 55 SCHOOL DISTRICT, IL. Program Goal for In 08-09, the District Facilitator for Partnerships will work with 3 Partnership Schools. Each ATP will include 6-12 members parents, 2-3 teachers, and an administrator. Optional community members and other school staff. (High School ATPs will include 1-2 students.) Each school’s One-Year Action Plan for Partnerships will include at least 4 goals, with at least 2-4 family and community involvement activities for each goal. All six types of involvement will be included among the activities scheduled throughout the school year. Each ATP will implement planned activities, evaluate the work, and continue their program with training and encouragement from the district facilitator. EXAMPLE

56 56 What is YOUR program goal In 08-09, I (and my colleagues) will work with ______ # Partnership Schools Tailor YOUR goal for YOUR work in YOUR district. GUESS-TIMATE: ______% my (and colleagues) FTE time on partnerships ______ # days per week on district leadership ______ # days per week facilitating schools This includes helping (approximately)... _______ # schools to form ATPs and get started _______ # schools to improve their programs (already have ATPs)

57 57 DISTRICT LEADERSHIP and FACILITATION STRATEGIES for School, Family, and Community Partnerships LEAD & SUCCEED

58 58 LEAD & SUCCEED ALIGN PROGRAM & POLICY GUIDE LEARNING & PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT SHARE KNOWLEDGE CELEBRATE MILESTONES DOCUMENT PROGRESS & EVALUATE OUTCOME AWARENESS

59 59 Leadership & Facilitation Strategies Create awareness Actively promote the district’s partnership program to key stakeholders. Align program & policy Integrate partnership plans and practices with district policies and procedures. Help schools link partnership plans to school goals. Guide learning & program development Conduct One-Day Team Training Workshops for schools’ ATPs and on-going professional development activities for district and school colleagues. Conduct district-level leadership activities. Share knowledge Communicate on a regular schedule to increase knowledge about effective partnership programs, collect best practices, and network with others locally and statewide. Celebrate Milestones Recognize progress and excellence. Document progress & evaluate outcomes Evaluate teamwork, family and community involvement activities, and the quality of district and school programs.

60 60 LEADERSHIP AND FACILITATION STRATEGY Create Awareness Create a Newsletter on Partnerships Actively promote the district’s partnership program to key stakeholders.

61 61 LEADERSHIP AND FACILITATION STRATEGY Align Program and Policy Begin with a Partnership Pilot Program Integrate partnership plans and practices with district policies and procedures. Help schools link partnership plans to School goals.

62 62 LEADERSHIP AND FACILITATION STRATEGY Guide Learning and Program Development Provide two three-hour Action Team for Partnerships workshops Conduct One-Day Team Training Workshops for schools’ ATP and on-going professional development. Conduct district-level leadership activities.

63 63 LEADERSHIP AND FACILITATION STRATEGY Share Knowledge Weekly FAX to Chairs of All Action Team for Partnerships Communicate on a regular schedule, collect best practices, network with others locally and statewide

64 64 LEADERSHIP AND FACILITATION STRATEGY Celebrate Milestones ATP End-of-Year Celebration Recognize progress and excellence

65 65 LEADERSHIP AND FACILITATION STRATEGY Document Progress and Evaluate Outcomes Document: Provide progress data for stakeholders Evaluate: Use survey to collect End-of-Year Evaluations FOR ALL SIX STRATEGIES, SEE: NNPS website, Click on Success Stories for the annual collections of Promising Partnership Practices and summaries of the work of Partnership District Award winners. Evaluate teamwork, family and community involvement activities, quality of district and school programs

66 66 More Examples: Leadership & Facilitation Strategies and Activities Strategies for Developing Your Partnership Program District-Level Leadership Actions your office takes to assist all schools Direct Assistance to Schools To help each school’s ATP strengthen its partnership program Create Awareness Press releases and district newsletter Orientation for new Superintendent SFCP Workshop for principals Speak at schools’ open-house nights Align Program and Policy Superintendant mandates One-Year Action Plans linked to School Improvement Plan Help school adapt district policy for own policy Guide Program Development Cluster meetings Mini-grants for SFCP Homework project with curriculum leaders One-Day Workshop for school ATPs Advanced topics “Refreshers” for new team members

67 67 More Examples: Leadership & Facilitation Strategies and Activities Strategies for Developing Your Partnership Program District-level Leadership Actions your office takes to assist all schools Direct Assistance to Schools Actions to assist each school’s ATP strengthen its partnership program Share Knowledge Computerized “Knowledge Bank” of sfcp practices Monthly newsltr for families Weekly or monthly or fax to ATPs from district facilitator Website on sfcp Celebrate Milestones Promising practices book for district Photos, end-of-year celebration, displays by each school Document Progress and Evaluate Outcomes Notebook of ALL school plans District UPDATE survey Notebook for schools’ work and plans End-of-Year Evaluat’n Schools’ UPDATE surveys

68 Minute Break

69 69 Exploring District Leadership Plans

70 70 Explore District Leadership Your District Who will be the District Facilitator for Partnerships? How much time will be given for this work (percentage or FTE)? How many schools will develop ATP’s? What are the demographics of those schools? –ELL –ED –IEP –Ethnicity What Lead & Succeed activities will you first implement?

71 71 Page 1: Conduct District Leadership Activities Page 2: Facilitating Your Schools ATP DRAFT of YOUR DISTRICT LEADERSHIP ACTION PLAN FOR PARTNERSHIPS Who are YOUR target audiences for leadership and facilitative strategies? Which activities will be most effective in YOUR district for each strategy? What challenge(s) might you need to solve to conduct each strategy? Who can assist you with the activities for each strategy?

72 72 Page 1

73 73 Page 2

74 74 District Leadership Institute DISTRICT FACILITATORS: Are you able to... Explain the Six Types Framework and Implementation? Describe the roles and responsibilities of district facilitators? Select strategies for effective leadership and facilitation on partnerships for your district? Draft a district leadership plan for 08-09? Conduct a One-Day Team-Training Workshop for your schools’ Action Teams for Partnerships? Guide schools to write an effective One-Year Action Plan for Partnerships?

75 75 Q & A What are YOUR QUESTIONS about YOUR work on partnerships including: DISTRICT-LEVEL LEADERSHIP on partnerships? FACILITATING your schools’ ATPs in developing their school-based partnership programs?

76 76 Follow-up OPTIONS: How can PEP help you “Lead and Succeed” in 08-09? Send PEP a copy of your FINAL Leadership Action Plan for Partnerships for Keep in contact with PEP. Join National Network of Partnership Schools. Other requests and ideas?

77 77 Q & A Other Questions All Questions Final Questions

78 78 YOUR Assignment Put This Knowledge Into Action! Please complete the DLI evaluation. THANK YOU for your leadership on partnerships!

79 79 Merle Siefken, Toll free: Fax:


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